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  • replied
    Originally posted by UTPlayer529th View Post
    What does this change in what ini setting?
    Oh shoot. I thought that question was answered lol.

    UTEngine.ini

    [Engine.Player]
    ConfiguredInternetSpeed=10000 (should be Cable Modem)
    ConfiguredLanSpeed=20000 (should be LAN)

    Also configured with the netspeed command in console.

    I don't know what Unknown, Modem, and ISDN correspond to (in the .ini). Here's an outdated (UT99?) configuration walkthrough with good info nonetheless. I don't believe the "divide by 64" stuff applies anymore. I was looking into this stuff recently, and I think those values are in bytes/second and they specify the client's maximum inbound and outbound bandwidth, excluding occasional bursts. When you open stat net (F6), you can observe your traffic in the In Rate (bytes) and Out Rate (bytes) fields. Still, my Out Rate regularly exceeds our Internet subscription's upload speed, so something isn't quite making sense (or lots of my data is compressed/delayed/dropped, or those values don't represent UT3's true traffic). Compare against the traffic reported in Windows's Resource Monitor for UT3 or a better program.

    I don't specifically know why the LAN setting raises the FPS cap since the cap doesn't appear to scale with my various netspeed configurations.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by Legionz View Post
    What's the point of having higher fps than your monitor's refresh rate?
    Lower frametime (i.e., real delay between frames) and the potential to reduce microstutter (i.e., visible choppiness from frametime spikes). Let's say with VSync at 60 FPS and a 60Hz monitor that the monitor will have a delay of 16.6ms between receiving each frame on average. Outputting more frames to the monitor increases the accuracy of the image on-screen to a value less than that 16.6ms, even if that may introduce screen tearing (i.e., parts of the image displayed are noticeably from different frames), which has not been an issue for my current monitor.

    Also, it's not that a 60Hz monitor only displays one frame every 16.6ms and then does nothing until the next 16.6ms interval, but rather that it takes the monitor 16.6ms to fully replace the previous frame, line by line from top to bottom, with newer frame data. So, for example, 8.3ms after receiving frame data, the monitor is halfway finished updating its pixels when it receives a new frame. The now old frame data will be discarded for the even newer data, and the bottom half of the image will be updated with the even newer data.

    As for microstutter, FPS is a rather imprecise measurement. What if 30 out of 60 frames in one second are received in the first 0.1s, for example? You'll really noticed that delay with any movement on-screen. However exaggerated that may be, we have discovered that graphics card will occasionally output two or three frames in very quick succession (i.e., "runt frames"?), like within 5ms, when the average frametime should be higher, which can produce visible microstutter. This became a widely known issue with AMD cards/drivers once awareness of frametime finally broke into the mainstream enthusiasts' consciousness. Likewise, SLI/CFX (i.e., multiple GPUs) will produce more FPS than a single GPU, but at the cost of more uneven frametime, especially with the lower-end GPUs that made for good FPS at a bargain price (e.g., 2x GTX460 vs. single card solution yielding similar FPS was a pronounced example in its time). Despite AMD's generally better price per FPS performance value, nVidia was aware of or had solutions for frametime issues far earlier than AMD, resulting in overall smoother gaming experiences. AMD has since expanded their driver improvement efforts to include smoother frametime.

    The basic philosophy is to have the lowest frametime possible, or least a frametime below your monitor's refresh rate, the fewest and lowest frametime spikes as possible, and the greatest consistency between frametimes. It's all quite analogous to desiring network delay with the smallest variance (i.e., jitter). Of course, there are diminishing returns that come with ever lower frametime, as with all input delay reductions.

    The "breakthrough" benchmarking article that first popularized the concept of frametime in the gaming sector still provides solid explanations. Most or all performance monitoring software should include a measure for frametime by now. I use MSI Afterburner, but I don't measure frametime myself.

    This was all pulled from memory with no references, so I might have made some mistakes, but I don't think so.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by Legionz View Post
    What's the point of having higher fps than your monitor's refresh rate?
    Some people have problems with tearing at FPS greater than their max refresh rate. Using vSync to get rid of tearing can cause a worse problem for fast twitch gamers: input lag.
    "Input lag
    Video games, which use a wide variety of rendering engines, tend to benefit visually from vertical synchronization, as a rendering engine is normally expected to build each frame in real time, based on whatever the engine's variables specify at the moment a frame is requested. However, because vertical synchronization causes input lag, it interferes with the interactive nature of games,[3] and particularly interferes with games that require precise timing or fast reaction times."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screen_tearing
    http://forums.steampowered.com/forum....php?t=2903447

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by xeanderthal View Post
    Its one of the settings needed to fully uncap frame rate. I *believe* setting to anything else caps the FPS at 90. Also, it seems ~350 FPS is the max frames online. Although I have gotten ~900 FPS offline (instant action), the FPS is very bursty and will oscillate between 300 FPS to 900 FPS and has the 'feel' of being in the slow field...

    There is another setting that supposedly helps fix mouse lag at high FPS you will want to disable(OneFrameThreadLag?)
    What's the point of having higher fps than your monitor's refresh rate?

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by UTPlayer529th View Post
    What does this change in what ini setting?

    I was getting 90fps, then it shot up to 357 after i changed it to LAN, from Cable
    Its one of the settings needed to fully uncap frame rate. I *believe* setting to anything else caps the FPS at 90. Also, it seems ~350 FPS is the max frames online. Although I have gotten ~900 FPS offline (instant action), the FPS is very bursty and will oscillate between 300 FPS to 900 FPS and has the 'feel' of being in the slow field...

    There is another setting that supposedly helps fix mouse lag at high FPS you will want to disable(OneFrameThreadLag?)

    Leave a comment:


  • started a topic Cable modem to Lan connection

    Cable modem to Lan connection

    What does this change in what ini setting?

    I was getting 90fps, then it shot up to 357 after i changed it to LAN, from Cable
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