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    UT used as scientific standard

    From Science Magazine, September 25, 2009 issue's Random Samples section ...

    "A 2006 survey of online video gamers revealed that 85% were male. Why the skew? Evolution, say researchers at the University of Missouri, Columbia.

    Psychology graduate student Jonathan Oxford and colleagues recruited 42 undergraduate men, divided them into teams of three, and measured the testosterone levels in their saliva before and after they played a violent video game, Unreal Tournament 2004. Each participant played two game types: Death Match, in which teammates battled one another, and Onslaught, in which teammates cooperated to fight another team. The researchers found that competition raised testosterone levels more when men battled "outgroups" than when they vied with a fellow team member.

    The results bear out the notion, which has also been suggested in sports studies, that fighting as a team taps into males' evolved propensity for engaging in "coalitional male-male competition," the authors report in an article in press in Evolution and Human Behavior. "Beating a teammate ... does not result in a testosterone surge and may even dampen testosterone release," says psychologist David Geary, a co-author. The differing physiological effects of battling opponents from ingroups and outgroups "are similar to the testosterone challenge response found during male-male competition over mates and status in other species," he says. Harvard University primatologist Richard Wrangham says the findings from the study are "highly suggestive. ... The influence of prehistoric war on the biology of male brains looks critical to understanding the allure of violence." "

    rael2rael

    #2
    Interesting read...maybe you could link the source so we can read the rest?

    Comment


      #3
      This article can't be linked to as it's from one of those useless pages where you have to sign up to read their stuff.

      And how do I know this, Skippy_Doe? Well, he quoted parts of the article, and google likes quotes :P

      Comment


        #4
        I quoted everything that appeared in Science so there's no need to link to it.

        I will request a copy of the paper from Jonathan Oxford. Maybe he'll put it up on his web site ...
        http://psychology.missouri.edu/jkoc52

        rael2rael

        Comment


          #5
          more

          Got a reply from Jon Oxford, the graduate student who worked on the project. Jon writes, "It is really cool that I am getting a PhD by having people play what was my favorite game."

          He sent me a copy of his paper that he plans to post on a web site. Here are few quotes from the paper ...

          " Unreal Tournament 2004 by Atari games was chosen
          because it provides detailed graphics and two appropriate
          game types. The game type Death Match was used during
          the within-group tournaments. The match provides multiple
          opposing individuals with an arena and weapons, and is
          scored on the bases of the number of frags (i.e., kills of the
          opponent) they obtain within the allotted time. Skill in this
          game type requires a player to use different weapons
          effectively to inflict maximal damage and avoid losing
          points by killing themselves (some weapons kill everyone
          within a specific area). The participants practiced this game
          type with teammates during the practice sessions; all three
          team members played simultaneously."

          The participants " were given class credit for participating
          and they competed for cash awards to make the outcome of
          the tournaments salient. For the between-group tournament,
          all members of the winning team were awarded $45 and
          members of the losing team $15. For the within-group
          tournament, the top-ranked player was awarded $45 and the
          two other players $15."

          rael2rael

          Comment


            #6
            You can read Oxford's master thesis here (about ut03/04 as a "violent" game and its influence on hormones ... or something like that :lol ):
            http://edt.missouri.edu/Fall2008/The...6/research.pdf

            It's the 'long version' of the arcticle ScienceMag reported about:

            Jonathan Oxford, Davidé Ponzi, David C. Geary (online 2009): Hormonal responses differ when playing violent video games against an ingroup and outgroup
            Evolution and Human Behavior, In Press, Corrected Proof, Available online 15 September 2009

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              #7
              Very interesting read... nice post.

              Comment

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