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    Wasn't sure exactly where to put this but anyways. I was wondering,
    Does anyone know a site that tells you how much cooling fans and such
    You need for the Up to Date Hardware. In ranges particularly of Two 8800's,
    9600's or 9800's with a Q6600? The rest I know how to upgrade just the cooling
    I don't want to over spend on something that I wont need.
    Planning on upgrading by the end of this year hopefully.

    Also If water cooling is the scenario,
    Couldn't you use mineral oil? Just a dumb question maybe.

    Thanks.

    P.S. Basically this is to run UT3 better then i do now.
    (System specs below running at 30-60FPS At 1024x768 Maxed)

    #2
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PtufuXLvOok
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6sP45uBj4-k&NR=1

    Comment


      #3
      Mineral oil viscosity is too high, too hard to pump and the flow at the surfaces of the heat sink will be too low and heat transfere will be poor.

      Water is best, but not pure water. Water mixed with chemicals, a pre-mix is best, good for 3 years or so. Here is mine.

      http://www.oldkawman.com/liquid_cooling.html

      Comment


        #4
        oh quit giving him BS.
        you dont want water cooling, its a hassle that isnt worth taking.
        use air. its good enough.
        just google some reviews on aftermarket coolers on the card you are wanting to use.
        they each put out diff heat sources and the size / noise of the coolers is a give/take situation.
        i use water, its a mess.
        takes a lot of maintenance and a lot of case room if you want it all neat.
        i say go with air.
        i recommend a 80cfm or higher 120mm exhaust fan, aftermarket cooling on gpu and cpu, no ramsinks with thermaltape they suck, and arctic mx-2 or arctic silver 5 thermal compound on both.

        if you are really wanting low temps just to show off, get a TEC system, sub zero temps, but a lot of work and upkeep.
        hey who doesnt like spraying down the motherboard with a protective spray to keep condensation from frying it?

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Zera View Post
          oh quit giving him BS.
          you dont want water cooling, its a hassle that isnt worth taking.
          use air. its good enough.
          just google some reviews on aftermarket coolers on the card you are wanting to use.
          they each put out diff heat sources and the size / noise of the coolers is a give/take situation.
          i use water, its a mess.
          takes a lot of maintenance and a lot of case room if you want it all neat.
          i say go with air.
          i recommend a 80cfm or higher 120mm exhaust fan, aftermarket cooling on gpu and cpu, no ramsinks with thermaltape they suck, and arctic mx-2 or arctic silver 5 thermal compound on both.

          if you are really wanting low temps just to show off, get a TEC system, sub zero temps, but a lot of work and upkeep.
          hey who doesnt like spraying down the motherboard with a protective spray to keep condensation from frying it?
          Maybe yours is a mess and has problems, but that does not mean they all are like that. Air cooling is usually fine even for most overclocking situations if you do not mind the noise of the high CFM fans required to remove the hot air from inside the case. A high quality liquid cooling system assembled correctly is very low maintenance and almost silent. It also keeps the temps inside the case at ambient levels because the radiator is external to the case.

          Check out the koolance website.
          http://www.koolance.com/default.php

          Comment


            #6
            Koolance is awesome their stuff works really well...
            And Liquid cooling barelly requires maintenance, its like oldkawman1 "A high quality liquid cooling system assembled correctly is very low maintenance and almost silent."

            Basically comes down to how much cooling you want and how much noise you can live with.

            I'd go with a good liquid solution.

            Comment


              #7
              Ill see how regular fan cooling turns out and if it doesn't do as good as
              I would hope I will submerge it in mineral oil to see if that lowers the temps more.
              Or I might just try and just say screw it and go straight with liquid cooling. Just got
              to wait a couple of months and save up. Plus If I do water cooling I'll have it installed
              professionally to where I'm certain no leaks will be caused then It will make it easier on me.

              Is it true though that the 9800's are so big they need to be in a full tower case?

              Thanks for your guys help so far. =)

              Comment


                #8
                Well, if noise is not much of a problem:

                Best CPU air-cooling solution:
                http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16835233003
                Get a case with at least two 120mm fans included (one in front and one in the back), or get a couple of these:
                http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16835233009

                Your GPU(s) should be fine in a good mid-tower case. The cooling on them should be sufficient, just use a tweaker app and set the fan speed higher. Also, have you already purchased a 9800? If not, you might want to reconsider your card. Also, don't settle for a dual-core, a Q6600 will easily and safely overclock to QX6850 speeds on air cooling and the multi-threading will become worth it.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Ya i was planning on getting a Q6600 lol.
                  And no I wont be purchasing anything until I know my cooling will do.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Well once you select your cooling (if you are looking at air cooling, what I posted above is highly recommended), you might want to look at a Radeon 4850 (or if you have a little extra $$, a 4870). The 4850 outperforms a 9800GTX in almost all games and the 4870 outperforms the 3870X2. Yes, they have some stock heat issues, but they can be fixed with a fan-speed patch (or a separate VGA cooling solution).

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Wait I'm sorry if this is a dumb question but will it function right with my motherboard?

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Enforcer-5 View Post
                        Wait I'm sorry if this is a dumb question but will it function right with my motherboard?
                        If your motherboard has a PCI Express x16 slot or a PCI Express 2.0 slot, then it will work. You can also check if your motherboard supports CrossFire if you plan to multi-GPU (not really worth it though). If not, then stick with a good Intel chipset motherboard (this is a good one: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16813128337). Also, make sure you select a good power supply of at least 500W (I recommend the Corsair 550VX PSU).

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Enforcer-5 View Post
                          I would hope I will submerge it in mineral oil to see if that lowers the temps more.
                          I threw those videos up there because your mention of mineral oil reminded me of this strange technique.

                          The Pugetsystems design is really slick (heh). I'd love to give it a try myself, and maybe someday I will.

                          They've been running theirs for at least a year, and there are a couple issues about it that they report on, on their website (which is worth reading):

                          1). You can run it the way they show it on the video, and it will be extremely stable, completely dust free, and utterly silent. However, over a period of 12 hours or more under load, the oil temperature will eventually stabilize around 85c. This is obviously really hot, and though the system (remarkably) remains rock stable throughout, I would not be eager to put up with that.

                          This can be addressed by adding a submersion pump, a (large) external radiator, with (optionally), a fan. The second video shows an example of this solution.

                          2). The oil has a way of wicking up through some cables (like braided cables), and would end up dripping out of your mouse, or into other things like hard drives that you'd rather not have it in. One suggestion I've seen to correct this, which I would probably follow, would be to have the initial connections to the motherboard made with extension cables, and keep the junction to the
                          components' own cables elevated and dry. The wicking presumably would not pass the junction. There's also supposed to be some sort of anti wicking clamp or grommet or some such thing for cables, available commericially. Which would make sense, I gather, since oil immersion is not unknown as a cooling method in electronics generally. But I haven't looked into that.

                          There's some other minor things. Pugetsystems did some sealing up of things, against evaporation (does oil evaporate?), but reported no loss from that. And the guy in the second video reported that the oil got cloudy after a while. He said it was picking up loose bits of excess thermal grease from around the edges of the heat sinks, and he fixed it by putting a coffee filter around the end of the return tube from the radiator.

                          I don't think you'll ever get incredibly low temperatures from this kind of setup, and I'm not sure how well it would stack up as a cooling solution for the extremely crack headed overclocking activities a lot folks like to go in for.
                          However, as I mentioned before, Pugetsystems has reported that their system is extremely stable, even if allowed to run at high temperatures (perhaps because immersion eliminates "hot spots"). And I've noticed that people who try this generally make similar observations.

                          And of course it looks really neat.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            If you're thinking about going with air-cooling, check this case out. It was built specifically with keeping gaming-quality hardware air-cooled in mind.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Enforcer-5 View Post
                              Ya i was planning on getting a Q6600 lol.
                              And no I wont be purchasing anything until I know my cooling will do.

                              __________________
                              Intel Pentium D @ 3.OOGhz
                              XFX Nvidia 680i LT SLi MoBo
                              2 XFX 8500GT 512MB(Each)
                              160GB Hard Drive
                              Ultra Aluminus ATX Mid-Tower Case
                              2x1GB Corsair RAM
                              ULTRA 500W PSU
                              You need to get new video cards as well, or at least one good one. Taking 2 cheap non gaming low performance cards and making an SLI setup is a waste of money.

                              Comment

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