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"Gritty" post processing settings?

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  • replied
    Originally posted by Shivan Hunter View Post
    Hitman, your postprocessing is way too dark. I can't see a thing in your pic.

    It's all about the Scene_shadows. You should only adjust them a small amount, but they can have an excellent effect on the contrast and darkness of the map.

    The X, Y, and Z values equate to R, G, and B, respectively. Adjust all three to the same value unless you want coloration; however, coloration can be done much more effectively through lighting.

    Play around with the settings until you get the effect you want. Scene_shadows is good for dark and gritty, scene_highlights is good for light and airy. Of course, a good postprocessing effect combines all three, but for a quick and easy effect, those are the ones to go for.

    Here is an example of just how little you need to adjust Scene_shadows:

    this is a cube with some meshes with normal postprocessing:


    And this is the effect after setting all three values of Scene_shadows from 0 to 0.01 (!) :


    As you can see, it has a profound effect. Even 0.01 may be too much.

    Scene_highlights is a completely different beast, however. By default, all those settings are at 1, and it takes some drastic modification for a noticable effect (both Scene_shadows and Scene_highlights have a higher sensitivity the closer the value is to 0; the "effect" of a change in value is inversely proportional to the value itself, for the mathematically inclined.)

    I don't know much about the value range for Scene_midtones since I don't play with them much. Shadows and highlights have a more profound effect anyway, and I can usually achieve the effect I'm looking for using just those two.
    héhé thx for sharing that lil' lesson mate; interressant & usefull

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  • replied
    I get it now, scene shadows are the way to go!

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  • replied
    Hitman, your postprocessing is way too dark. I can't see a thing in your pic.

    It's all about the Scene_shadows. You should only adjust them a small amount, but they can have an excellent effect on the contrast and darkness of the map.

    The X, Y, and Z values equate to R, G, and B, respectively. Adjust all three to the same value unless you want coloration; however, coloration can be done much more effectively through lighting.

    Play around with the settings until you get the effect you want. Scene_shadows is good for dark and gritty, scene_highlights is good for light and airy. Of course, a good postprocessing effect combines all three, but for a quick and easy effect, those are the ones to go for.

    Here is an example of just how little you need to adjust Scene_shadows:

    this is a cube with some meshes with normal postprocessing:


    And this is the effect after setting all three values of Scene_shadows from 0 to 0.01 (!) :


    As you can see, it has a profound effect. Even 0.01 may be too much.

    Scene_highlights is a completely different beast, however. By default, all those settings are at 1, and it takes some drastic modification for a noticable effect (both Scene_shadows and Scene_highlights have a higher sensitivity the closer the value is to 0; the "effect" of a change in value is inversely proportional to the value itself, for the mathematically inclined.)

    I don't know much about the value range for Scene_midtones since I don't play with them much. Shadows and highlights have a more profound effect anyway, and I can usually achieve the effect I'm looking for using just those two.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Yes that is true unfotunatley. Although in my grinder map, it's kind of a rough effect sorta:

    http://i54.photobucket.com/albums/g9...g?t=1245469013

    But the effect might get lost once I change the color scheme.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by »TheHitMan« View Post
    Well yes I have "gritty" materials on my meshes but I want the overall world to have a "rough" effect I suppose.
    Sandpaper works well, about 50 grit? What I normally do is check out stock or other maps that have a look I like and go from there. It's hard to define "gritty" and "rough" in my opinion and the PP volumes have limitations on what they can do.

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  • replied
    Well yes I have "gritty" materials on my meshes but I want the overall world to have a "rough" effect I suppose.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by »TheHitMan« View Post
    Yeah I tried messing with scene highlights and stuff but it didn't really do much except for the coloring.
    Hmm, it's not going to do much more than that. PP volumes have limitation. What does "gritty" mean to you. Maybe it needs to be done with mateirals and meshes and maybe some particles?

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  • replied
    Yeah I tried messing with scene highlights and stuff but it didn't really do much except for the coloring.

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  • replied
    I wish there was a very detailed tutorial on PP volumes. I know of one and it's good for beginners, but more info would be helpful What is a Scene_Highlighs anyways?

    I am guessing here, based on testing. You might want to increase your Scene_Desaturation. If you go to 1.0, your level will look black and white. You can also try increasing the Scene_Highlights as well.

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  • started a topic "Gritty" post processing settings?

    "Gritty" post processing settings?

    I want to create a gritty post processing effect for my map, what post processing settings would I use? Also, I want it to be grey.
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