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    Ut3 Map As Normal Map

    Hey there!

    I have just bought Unreal Tournament 3 and I liked the game and levels pretty much...I was wondering if you could export or convert an UT3 MAP to an regular normal map?...in mapformats like: map, obj, x, bsp etc.

    Because I want to import them into Milkshape 3D, AC3D or 3D Studio Max and edit them there, instead of the Level Editor that comes with the game.

    Is this possible in any way?


    Thank you very much in advance


    James Shafey

    #2
    i believe you can export it as a 3d brush of some kind but thats the limit of my knoledge on this matter,

    sorry.

    Comment


      #3
      No, trust me it no only cannot be done, you do not want to do it. I can understand not wantign to have to go through and learn how to use the editor, but it's not possible to build a full level in milkshape and import it in

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Morphine View Post
        No, trust me it no only cannot be done, you do not want to do it. I can understand not wantign to have to go through and learn how to use the editor, but it's not possible to build a full level in milkshape and import it in
        you could build a full level in a 3d program, import it and set the collision to each poly, (but that'll eat a hole through your rendering) however you cannot export a mesh or a full level from UT3 as a 3d object to edit in a 3d program.

        Comment


          #5
          Yes you can build a level entirely in a 3d package like zephyr says. However certain things are easer to do from UnrealEd that will save you hours of work.

          The core design of a level would be built within UnrealEd. Then you would import you assists into the level that are made in a separate 3d package. (ie Maya, Max, etc) For instance creating a generator would be done in a 3D package.

          Texture within UnrealEd 3 are very complex, its just way to much to explain. I suggest watching the tutorial videos that come with UT3. However thats only with the collectors edition.

          Comment


            #6
            Trying to build a level entirely in a 3d package and importing it in is possible but a horrible practice.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Morphine View Post
              Trying to build a level entirely in a 3d package and importing it in is possible but a horrible practice.
              for UE3, yes. Other engines are designed for it.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Morphine View Post
                Trying to build a level entirely in a 3d package and importing it in is possible but a horrible practice.
                It's pretty easy; it's how we're doing it at the company I work for - model 100% in Modo, split it into exportable meshes, and re-import. So long as you understand the scale properties and the game movement metrics, you're fine.

                Comment


                  #9
                  UE3 makes excellent use of instanced geometry, so if you intend to build your level in a separate package, a good practice would be to build that level out of repeating instances. For example, a 2048 bridge from 4 x 512 identical pieces, then import one piece of the bridge into UEd and duplicate it 4 times. Try to break your level down into as many repeatable blocks as you can. This will allow you to optimise texture space, and also allow the engine to cull more of the map as needed. If you export that bridge as a massive 20,000 poly object rather than 4 repeating 5,000 poly objects (for example) then whenever any single piece of that bridge is visible, the engine needs to 'draw' the entire thing.

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                    #10
                    Actually I have found that making a cave map in maya was so much easier than in UEd, just for the simple fact that maya has the extrude tool, and materials are easy to add also.

                    One thing to note, if you are going to do it in another package, don't let your poly count get outrageous on one mesh, because if you do not add an LOD, then the engine will render all of those at once, and it goes back to the simple motto of optimization. If you cannot see it, then there is no point in rendering it.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Hourences made this level in 3dsMax:
                      http://www.hourences.com/book/tutorialskrodan.htm

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