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Light make shiny spot on surface -- any way to prevent that?

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    Light make shiny spot on surface -- any way to prevent that?

    Is there any way to prevent a point light from making a shiny spot on a surface texture? I already tried editing the texture itself but to no avail.

    #2
    hmm.......... it should be a problem with the material. just remove all Specularity and Specularity masks, and you should gte NO reflection whatsoever from teh surface

    hope it works!

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      #3
      Alternatively, you can flatten out the specularity masks and make the peak lower, like that you'll still get some shiny-ness, but not such a bright spot anymore.

      Admittedly, not having worked with the UEd yet, I have no clue how that's done in the editor

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        #4
        I already did that, but I'm still getting the shiny spots.

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          #5
          What do you have connected to the Specular node in the Material?
          A screenshot of the material would help instead of guessing...

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            #6
            I was going to start a new thread, but this is on topic - please let me know if I'm derailing and I'll move it elsewhere.

            I'm also interested in this question. Is it possible to disable specular or diffuse output per-light rather than in the material editor? Also, is it possible to link lights per-mesh so that given a particular specular and/or diffuse casting light source, I can have it affect some surfaces only? I come from a VFX background and I'm an obsessive compulsive light linker! The ability to link (or unlink) lights on a per-mesh basis would make it much easier to simulate caustic/radiosity/gi effects with bounce and sfx lights.

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              #7
              Diffuse, Specular, etc. are in the Material, not in the Light actor.
              Lights only allow controlling of things such as light and shadows.
              Inserting a Directional or Spot light for example that didn't provide specular on a material that is designed to have specular would go against the laws of real world lighting, so I don't see where it would have a proper application.

              However, if you wish to have a variation on the lighting in a scene, there are user lighting channels (Unnamed_x) so that you can have independant lighting setups for specific groups of geometry. This allows for a lot of flexibility in assigning levels of lighting complexity to various objects in a scene.

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                #8
                ...so I don't see where it would have a proper application.
                Well to simulate the laws of physical lighting models, you often have to cheat those laws

                Something as simple as a bright light shining through a window onto a floor would produce a lot of bounce light - I'd like to be able to simulate that bounce light onto surfaces that have specular components, but I don't want the bounce itself to cast specular rays. It's not unusual for me to light a simple scene with over 50 light sources, just to simulate a single practical light source (obviously though I want to avoid using an excessive number of lights here, unless I mind three week build times!).

                Being able to control specular/diffuse on a per-light basis is just run of the mill in VFX, where the goal is to produce absolute photorealism. It's something I probably take for granted, so I'll miss it here, but at least I can link lights independently! Thanks for the tip!

                I guess I just need to get used to working to a different paradigm

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                  #9
                  Keep in mind that when dealing with lightmapped surfaces, you are not going to get real, accurate specular highlights anyways. Light is generalized in 3 directions to simulate specular highlights and to provide the ability to use normal maps with lightmaps, but each light will not cause an accurate specular highlight so the odds are you wouldn't notice whether the light was set to affect specular or not.

                  With LightEnvironments, all the lights affecting an object are combined down to a single main light and a SkyLight to increase efficiency of dynamic lighting. With this method, again, you will not get a specular highlight for each light (only for the combined light) so it becomes trivial whether you could toggle a light's ability to affect specular.

                  The only time this would truly be relevant is when using standard dynamic lighting which would probably end up killing performance and dynamic shadows are "crippled" for the most part so you would most likely want to avoid this anyways.

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                    #10
                    Cheers, thanks for info!

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