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Why our maps have better performance, Post Processing volumes

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    Why our maps have better performance, Post Processing volumes

    Hi, all

    OK, here's the reason why us custom mappers get better performance in our maps, the reason is Post Processing volumes. They add the post processing effects to the game, your level sits inside this post processing volume which add effects like bloom, depth of field which Epic maps have.


    1. Make a brush bigger than your level, right click the brush, Add Volume -> PostProcessingVolume. Move your brush out the way and you'll see the new volume(just like any other volume)





    I did wonder why custom levels were missing PP effects, so thats why.

    #2
    Most of the maps I've downloaded do use post processing, though. I think they're simply faster because Epic's maps are absolutely loaded with details, which aren't always noticeable unless you're playing on max settings and actually paying attention. From what I've seen they use many, many more lights, an excess of blocking volumes, and probably a lot more meshes too.

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      #3
      The reason why "custom maps" run so well is because most of them are sooooo under detailed that it feels like I'm playing the original UT.

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        #4
        When from what I was hearing, UE3 engine can use loads of static meshes without much of a performance hit at all.

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          #5
          Well the reasoning behind the many blockingvolumes simply looks like a collision calculation thing to me.
          They set the Static mesh to BlockWeapons and the blocking volume to BlockallbutWeapons.

          This way the mesh only receives weapons fire and the blocking volume deals with the players. I've seen this in several Epic maps.

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            #6
            Its also so you dont get stuck on every little corner that sticks out half a unit. Lots of lights are only slow when they affect dynamic primitives. Otherwise they are just baked away into lightmaps and never affect the scene again. Dynamic lights, however, cause a lighting pass to be performed for that light, which lowers your frame rate for every pass. Lots of post process effects do the same thing, in a very linear fashion. Keep that in mind. Using the UberPostProcessEffect saves because it does the bloom, DOF all at once, and then writes directly to the final frame buffer, which avoids a copy. Still, every post process effect causes you to lose fillrate, which lowers your frame rate.

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              #7
              Reason is simple: most community mappers do not have as fast/new computers as Epic. So when we see FPS drop too low for our taste we stop adding eyecandy. Epic mappers had probably some guide lines about average and minimal fps on map, and it was higher than community mappers will go because epic want this game to look as good as it can without going Crysis route.

              Another half of reason is that most of community mappers are learning new engine and do not use everything they could.

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