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Self-Paced Online Blender 3D Design Course

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    Self-Paced Online Blender 3D Design Course

    http://www.gryllus.net/Blender/3D.html

    Great stuff for you "open source" modelers making levels for UT3 or otherwise... Enjoy!

    Got this link from a BlenderArtists.org forum posting here: http://blenderartists.org/forum/showthread.php?t=111017

    * Excerpt description from the instructor Neal Hirsig (Tufts University): "The new course site contains all of the material on the old "Open Courseware" site as well as some additional material. I updated all of the tutorials to reflect Blender Version 2.45. The new site includes: Syllabus - 13 Learning Units - A complete listing (over a hundred) of my Blender video tutorials in Real Media streaming format, QuickTime format and downloadable QuickTime video - A complete listing (24) PDF tutorials with associated Zip files - 5 suggested Blender design projects and examples of project work done by my students."

    * Download the open source Blender 2.45 (free) - http://www.blender.org

    #2
    Thanks, I have been meaning to learn this software. One question, how easy it is to make the move from maya .

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      #3
      Originally posted by jansoft88 View Post
      Thanks, I have been meaning to learn this software. One question, how easy it is to make the move from maya .
      I'm new to all 3D modeling software but I'm starting to get the hang of Blender's interface. They say it is different than other packages but being open source it has a big following and plenty of community support and development history behind it.

      I tried Maya PLE when UT2004 came out and couldn't get the hang of it, probably because I was never exposed to any modeling other than UnrealEd and previous game editors. XSI Mod Tool is one I was evaluating at the same time as Blender and thats not bad either. But since you've used Maya the transition shouldn't be too hard because you know the modeling concepts already.

      Look at the video tutorial list on that page. They will tell you bit by bit how to do things. Plus there are more resources linked from blender.org and http://blenderartists.org forums are good too for help and discussion.

      If you install Blender 2.45 I recommend you do not put it under the default path starting under "C:\Program Files" if you have Windows Vista. Install it instead under C:\Blender... or whatever else as long as its out of the Program Files folder structure. Windows Vista's new security features (you can see and load your files in Blender if they are under Program Files, but you won't be able to see the files from Explorer) hides some files there since the Program Files area is for applications and is not meant to store actual user data in.

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        #4
        THANKS for the link Ikaros, I'm going to run through this when I get a chance, right now I'm trying to plow through the pretty cool wiki book Blender Noob to Pro: http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Blender_3D:_Noob_to_Pro
        also if you check the blender forum, there are some short vids by a teenager (I f0rget his name) that I have personally found to be the easiest to follow!

        Jansoft - I went to blender right out of getting through the MAYA tutorials so all my instincts were wrong for navigation - that much of the interface makes switching over a little difficult but becomes second nature with a few hundred hours (or so they tell me). Personally, I find the hardest switch is from the menu selection - in Maya I learned where everything is in the menus but in Blender I find the menus to be less intuitive and you really must learn the keyboard shortcuts, OTOH I LIKE these keyboard shortcuts and find them to be easier to remember than the shortcuts for Maya (8.5 PLE). please keep us posted on stuff you learn, I'm currently learning Inkscape first and designing a catercooling unit before I'll have a chance to tackle Blenfder and later still the UT3 ed.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by [s§s]Bison_Boy View Post
          Jansoft - I went to blender right out of getting through the MAYA tutorials so all my instincts were wrong for navigation - that much of the interface makes switching over a little difficult but becomes second nature with a few hundred hours (or so they tell me). Personally, I find the hardest switch is from the menu selection - in Maya I learned where everything is in the menus but in Blender I find the menus to be less intuitive and you really must learn the keyboard shortcuts, OTOH I LIKE these keyboard shortcuts and find them to be easier to remember than the shortcuts for Maya (8.5 PLE). please keep us posted on stuff you learn, I'm currently learning Inkscape first and designing a catercooling unit before I'll have a chance to tackle Blenfder and later still the UT3 ed.[/COLOR]

          Yeah, I had problem with navigation and menus when I tried it. Probably these tutorials will help. I recently learned the navigation of the UT3ed (which is radically different then maya) so now that I know that I "can" use a software with different navigation , I'll give blender another shot.

          Question: How's the sculpt tool in maya, is it nearly as good as Zbrush or Mudbox? Coz that would be AWESOME.

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            #6
            Question, is there a way to change the navigation keys in blender. Like if the shift key for the pan could be changed to alt and the rotations key could be changed to the left mouse button pressed with alt. And the zoom/pan can be attached to alt with the right button. Is that possible in any way?

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              #7
              You can pull down the top menu bar to expose a lot of default options. There is a section called view and controls. You can change mouse buttons, but keep in mind following anyone's video tutorials will become confusing. I'd recommend not changing default buttons. But if you modify any of these settings do a file/save default settings for them to keep. If you screw things up you can do a file/load factory defaults to get things back to original Blender settings.

              Comment


                #8
                Here is another good site with a downloadable PDF modeling guide:

                "The Precision Modelling Guide to Blender is a 151 page walk-through of Blenders mesh modelling tools and design techniques. Illustrated with over 600 images it gives a clear and concise introduction to using blender. By progressing through the guide you will be introduced to many of Blenders commonly used modelling tools and also a few of the not so well known ones. The tools are presented in a real working design example with explanations of why the tools are used and not merely a demonstration of the tools in use.

                http://www.rab3d.com/

                Don't be fooled by the name the guide is useful to anyone wanting a clear introduction to Blenders mesh modelling tools."

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