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  • replied
    Nice. Thanks agian DG.
    Now, Time for some texturing.

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  • replied
    Originally posted by BlkBullet23 View Post
    For the transparent textures like the wire fence. Will the player be able to shoot through the holes or will that be done using andother program?
    To shoot through the wire fence holes would require the fence to be made from mesh, which is way too triangle intensive, so fences usually stop all projectiles.

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  • replied
    Bundle of info.

    Originally posted by DGUnreal View Post
    Each are individual textures that you use together in a shader to create the final material.

    - For example, you may have the Diffuse which is the actual "texture" itself such as concrete or brick.

    - Then you may have a NormalMap which contains bump information about the texture. These look like a bluish and purple version of the texture (the RGB holds light vector or "surface normal" information). You can also create custom NormalMap textures by passing a grayscale bump map image through tools like the NVidia ones to get a final NormalMap. The grayscale bump map image is simply black is low height and white is high height.

    - Then a Specular map, which is similar to a grayscale or color mask, that determines the amount of specular shine per-pixel that is applied to the Diffuse. Black = dull, white = shiny.

    - Then a possible Emissive texture, which is a grayscale or color mask that determines the relative brightness of each pixel. Black = unlit, white = lit. This would be to do things like make part of a texture have lights on it, like a console or door access pad.

    - Also a possible Opacity texture, for things such as Grates or Wire Fences, which is a grayscale mask where black is transparent and white is opaque.

    etc.

    You can also have grayscale Diffuse Detail textures, and NormalMap Detail textures. It can get real complex in a UT3 Material.
    This is why texture sizes have not gone up to 4096+ in next gen engines, if a Material requires six textures, it needs a lot of texture memory on the video card. The advantage is that you can create materials that are very life-like and realistic, more so than previous engines. It is very common to have a UT3 Material that is using four textures, which is on average two more than UT2004.

    See the screenshot of the UE3 Material Editor on the Unreal Tech page. It shows a Diffuse, Specular and NormalMap.

    This is what I've been waiting for.
    Bravo DG. I see and understand how it works now.
    Thanks DG.

    For the transparent textures like the wire fence. Will the player be able to shoot through the holes or will that be done using andother program?

    Originally posted by ts_falcon View Post
    yea, one thing to note, is that you are still pixel bound, meaning there is no point in giving something like a barrel a 1024 map as it will only be around 200 pixels tall in most cases on your screen. it may look awesome when it fills the screen but how often would that happen? the performance hits are not worth it. something like 512 or even a well done 256 would be plenty.
    Nice. Hahaa, yeah that would be funny to have a stone block with 1024x1024.
    Gotcha. smaller textures for the smaller things and bigger textures for the medium to large surfaces.
    Hehee. I was almost gonna make a 1024 for small items.

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  • replied
    yea, one thing to note, is that you are still pixel bound, meaning there is no point in giving something like a barrel a 1024 map as it will only be around 200 pixels tall in most cases on your screen. it may look awesome when it fills the screen but how often would that happen? the performance hits are not worth it. something like 512 or even a well done 256 would be plenty.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Each are individual textures that you use together in a shader to create the final material.

    - For example, you may have the Diffuse which is the actual "texture" itself such as concrete or brick.

    - Then you may have a NormalMap which contains bump information about the texture. These look like a bluish and purple version of the texture (the RGB holds light vector or "surface normal" information). You can also create custom NormalMap textures by passing a grayscale bump map image through tools like the NVidia ones to get a final NormalMap. The grayscale bump map image is simply black is low height and white is high height.

    - Then a Specular map, which is similar to a grayscale or color mask, that determines the amount of specular shine per-pixel that is applied to the Diffuse. Black = dull, white = shiny.

    - Then a possible Emissive texture, which is a grayscale or color mask that determines the relative brightness of each pixel. Black = unlit, white = lit. This would be to do things like make part of a texture have lights on it, like a console or door access pad.

    - Also a possible Opacity texture, for things such as Grates or Wire Fences, which is a grayscale mask where black is transparent and white is opaque.

    etc.

    You can also have grayscale Diffuse Detail textures, and NormalMap Detail textures. It can get real complex in a UT3 Material.
    This is why texture sizes have not gone up to 4096+ in next gen engines, if a Material requires six textures, it needs a lot of texture memory on the video card. The advantage is that you can create materials that are very life-like and realistic, more so than previous engines. It is very common to have a UT3 Material that is using four textures, which is on average two more than UT2004.

    See the screenshot of the UE3 Material Editor on the Unreal Tech page. It shows a Diffuse, Specular and NormalMap.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    I dont quite get it. I now understand how the specular works, thanks to you.
    So your saying every texture has multiple layers, besides the one thats being drawn out? or once you run it through any of those tools, it would create additonal layers for your texture?

    Hehee, I'm Extremly, Extremely new to the whole texture thing.
    I can create simple textures in photoshop using simple tools and filters with a few layers. Once that is done. Is this where I'm suppose to run it through a third party tool?

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  • replied
    Originally posted by Elis View Post
    what would u suggest for a player model, by the way, what can ut3 support in terms of texture memory and poly counts?, lets say if i made a player model with 20k polys and 2048 textures, will ut3 be able to load it?
    2048 texture is fine and is what is usually used for players.

    20k model can be done, some of the staticmesh versions of the Epic models are in the 12k to 15k range. But remember that if you are using 2x what a normal model is using, you are impacting framerate more than a regular model and the result will be that fewer people will probably be able to play maps with your model on it. You should be able to get most of the detail you want with the NormalMap instead of putting the player model too high. The best rule of thumb is to do as much in the NormalMap as you can, and keep the model as simple as you can while retaining the basic shape.

    Originally posted by BlkBullet23 View Post
    I was going for just terrain textures and buildings.

    About the specular and any other maps, how may are there and what are their purposes?

    DG, you got some kickass maps and textures. I love the sky on your meadowland and pineridge levels.
    Terrain and buildings, depending on the exact texture, can be 1024 or 2048 size.

    NormalMap creates the illusion of more detail through providing faked surface normals. These can be created directly from textures using the NVidia Tools, CrazyBump, or ATI's Tools. So it can make terrain dirt look more 3d for example.

    Specular is like the shiny effect you see on metals or plastic. If you had a metal texture that had areas of rust on it, the specular texture version would be similar to the diffuse except the specular would not be shiny where the rust is, since rust is usually not shiny.

    Thanks. I have some UT3 maps I am developing that are way better than my UT2004 maps.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Thanks guys. Creating textures as we speak.
    I was going for just terrain textures and buildings. Not player models and vehicles.....yet .

    About the specular and any other maps, how may are there and what are their purposes?

    DG, you got some kickass maps and textures. I love the sky on your meadowland and pineridge levels.
    I hope to be as good as you one day.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    what would u suggest for a player model, by the way, what can ut3 support in terms of texture memory and poly counts?, lets say if i made a player model with 20k polys and 2048 textures, will ut3 be able to load it?

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    I am sure the original poster is not referring to just Player Model and Vehicle textures, which are usually 2048x2048.

    General textures for StaticMeshes and CSG Surfaces should still be only 512x512 or 1024x1024 in most cases, with only high detailed textures being at 2048x2048, and that is it.

    In UE3 the amount of texture usage is significantly greater than previous engines, so you can't go wild and try making all of your textures at 4096 or 8192. Since most Materials now include Diffuse, Diffuse Detail, NormalMap, NormalMap Detail, Specular, etc., you will eat through all of the texture memory with only a few objects at 2048+. Often you will be using special seamless 128x128 or 256x256 textures for a lot of things.

    Most older tech video cards won't do over 2048x2048 anyway. Last gen cards are usually around 4096, only the newer gen cards can do 8192. So time spent creating anything over 2048 is usually wasted.

    Originally posted by BlkBullet23 View Post
    Thanks DG.
    So Depending on the size of what I'm going for, Say a two story wall. Then around 1024x1024?
    That depends a bit on the texture itself. Create them as small as is possible but with keeping the detail. In most cases what worked good in UT2k4 works good in UT3.
    The new material system is powerful and usually there are tricks to getting a group of smaller textures looking more realistic than a single large texture.
    I prefer to usually use 1024x1024 for most tiling textures such as concretes, metals, woods, etc. Their NormalMap would also be 1024. Detail and Specular etc. would be smaller such as 128x128 and 256x256.

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  • replied
    The new Ati cards are able to process 8192x8192 textures... Dont know if the Nvidia ones use the same size. but without compression, these texture-sizes wont be useable.

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  • replied
    Thanks for the quick replys.

    Originally posted by DGUnreal View Post
    See this thread.
    Thanks DG.
    So Depending on the size of what I'm going for, Say a two story wall. Then around 1024x1024?

    Originally posted by Elis View Post
    1024 standard :P, 2048, is cool, 4096 is hardcore - do it!!

    in the end, keep in mind file size, 4096 is the best it could get.. however file size may be over 100mb for a single skin :P
    100mb. 4096x4096. Would that work for a cube alittle shorter than the player?

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  • replied
    1024 standard :P, 2048, is cool, 4096 is hardcore - do it!!

    in the end, keep in mind file size, 4096 is the best it could get.. however file size may be over 100mb for a single skin :P

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    See this thread.

    Leave a comment:


  • started a topic Texture size?

    Texture size?

    I'm barely getting into the 3d gaming world and I wanted to start creating my own textures for the unrealED and GowED.

    Currently using photoshop and I need to know what size I should be creating them at?
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