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CTF-Control_III

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    CTF-Control_III

    Name:CTF-Control_III
    Version:Alpha
    Compatibility:1.2
    Description:Remake from UT99
    Comments:
    Screenshot:http://i226.photobucket.com/albums/d...control_11.jpg
    Credits:John 2-4 Tate (UT), and me (UT3 version)
    Homepage:
    Download:http://rapidshare.com/files/10479199...III_Alpha2.rar

    I love this map so much, i played it all the time with friends in school lol It's my first map, and i m not so skilled mappper, so give me some feedback, advices pls ... It needs more deocoration, and so on ...

    #2
    Work on some atmospheric lighting. Fire up game (or google for screenshots) with some ancient temple ruins (like Tomb Raider Anniversary, or Far CRY) look for ideas how to make lighting and decorate your level there.

    Also make level additive, rip holes in roof, cracks on walls and add some green life peeking inside and some patches of blue sky. Then leaking water from hole in roof may make water ponds inside more beliveable. In some small dark room you can add lightmap effect of fire flames plus some actual flames and smoke.

    And do not forget ambient sounds, trigggered crickets in some grass or plant, frogs near water etc.

    Comment


      #3
      thx, i ll work on that

      Comment


        #4
        Yes, work on the lighting. Don't hesitate to use much of point lights, they're your bread and butter when it comes to indoor lighting. Also, get rid of the massive amount of ambient lighting.

        Comment


          #5
          What is the difference about point and ambient lights. As is said, im noob maper. Ambient cast shadows, point not?

          Comment


            #6
            Map is installed on this Server

            Name: Vulcanion.com powered by clanserver4.u.de
            IP: 195.13.62.22:27700
            MoD: ZeroPing Instagib Capture The Flag
            MapVoting: Yes (BiaVote)
            Installed Maps: Show Forum Thread here
            Map Alternative Download: CTF-Control_Alpha2




            || »Vûlçåñø« || Download UT3 Stuff || »RaiDen« Clan (UT2oo4/UT3) || Download UT2oo4 Stuff || »Vûlçåñø« ||

            Comment


              #7
              Gr8 man! Thx!

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by _Cox View Post
                What is the difference about point and ambient lights. As is said, im noob maper. Ambient cast shadows, point not?
                Point (aka Omni) - Emit light from a single point in all directions. Casts shadows. Control over falloff (the way the light intensity falls off as you move away from the light source).

                Skylight (aka Ambient) - Contribute light to all surfaces, regardless of position or direction. Does not cast shadows. No falloff control. In general, use sparingly (and with very, very low intensities) to avoid your scene looking flat.

                Directional (aka Sunlight) - Emit light in parallel rays, simulating a very distant light source such as the sun. Casts shadows. No falloff control.

                Spotlight - Emit light from a single point (like a Point light) but with a limited cone of effect. The Penumbra is the falloff angle between the cone of full influence and the cone of zero influence. Casts shadows. Control over falloff.

                NOTE: Not sure if UE3 supports the 'penumbra' option, though I imagine it does - it may be called something else.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by _Cox View Post
                  What is the difference about point and ambient lights. As is said, im noob maper. Ambient cast shadows, point not?
                  Point (aka Omni) - Emit light from a single point in all directions. Casts shadows.

                  Skylight (aka Ambient) - Contribute light to all surfaces, regardless of position or direction. Does not cast shadows.

                  Directional (aka Sunlight) - Emit light in parallel rays, simulating a very distant light source. Casts shadows.

                  Spotlight - Emit light from a single point (like a Point light) but with a limited cone of effect. The Penumbra is the falloff angle between the cone of full influence and the cone of zero influence. Casts shadows.

                  NOTE: Not sure if UE3 supports the 'penumbra' option, though I imagine it does - it may be called something else.

                  Also, when using Skylights it can be helpful to assign them to light groups so that they only affect a limited number of surfaces, which will give you control over the ambient color for each area in your map. Outdoors areas on a normal sunny day would have a very soft ambient blue, for example, while indoor areas in the same location might have a warmer ambient tone.

                  It can be helpful to start with an ambient intensity so low that it looks black in the color selector. This will add just a touch of color to the unlit areas in your map so you can see what you're doing. Only bring that light up in intensity when you've finished placing your other lights and want to increase the overall ambience.

                  Be aware, even slightly overdoing an ambient light source can totally murder the mood of a map.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Control was one of my favorits in ut99!

                    the design of your controll sucks also you should have made control-LE! with the extra route on the left.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by GSX600F View Post
                      Control was one of my favorits in ut99!

                      the design of your controll sucks also you should have made control-LE! with the extra route on the left.
                      What he meant to say was "I don't really like your layout, but check out CTF-Control-LE and consider adding the extra route on the left. Keep working on the map though because we are in desperate need of CTF maps."

                      No thanks necessary GSX.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by faultymoose View Post
                        Point (aka Omni) - Emit light from a single point in all directions. Casts shadows.

                        Skylight (aka Ambient) - Contribute light to all surfaces, regardless of position or direction. Does not cast shadows.

                        Directional (aka Sunlight) - Emit light in parallel rays, simulating a very distant light source. Casts shadows.

                        Spotlight - Emit light from a single point (like a Point light) but with a limited cone of effect. The Penumbra is the falloff angle between the cone of full influence and the cone of zero influence. Casts shadows.

                        NOTE: Not sure if UE3 supports the 'penumbra' option, though I imagine it does - it may be called something else.

                        Also, when using Skylights it can be helpful to assign them to light groups so that they only affect a limited number of surfaces, which will give you control over the ambient color for each area in your map. Outdoors areas on a normal sunny day would have a very soft ambient blue, for example, while indoor areas in the same location might have a warmer ambient tone.

                        It can be helpful to start with an ambient intensity so low that it looks black in the color selector. This will add just a touch of color to the unlit areas in your map so you can see what you're doing. Only bring that light up in intensity when you've finished placing your other lights and want to increase the overall ambience.

                        Be aware, even slightly overdoing an ambient light source can totally murder the mood of a map.
                        thx

                        I think i picked up a wrong style, these japanese style is not so good. LT pacjage would be more apropriate, what do u think?

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I quite like the theme to be honest I think once you've given it a makeover with some light and shadow, it should really 'pop'!

                          Might I suggest a quick 'crash course' on color theory? It's really easy to make your design consistent by choosing a color palette and sticking to it.

                          Basically, start by picking a tone that you think will work well - warm or cool - or oranges or blues in other words.

                          Then, advisably, deviate from it a little. Standard mid-tone orange/blue schemes are fairly overused (that's not to say they're bad, in fact they're overused because they complement each other so well).

                          So perhaps push your choice to one end or the other of it's scale. For example, if you pick warm tones, push it a little towards red or green. If you pick cool tones, push it a little towards purple or green. Don't oversaturate except where you want to draw attention - personally, I find that colors below the halfway saturation point most appealing, but obviously this comes down to your own choices.

                          The more saturated your color, the less 'realistic' it tends to appear. Even a bright red car in real life is only about 2/3rds of the range of red saturation in CG.

                          Fill your map with as many lights as you need in your chosen scheme. Vary them a little in saturation and intensity, and maybe even a little in hue, to avoid a monotone appearance. Don't worry about using too many lights! If you open a stock map, it's not unusual to see four or five dullish lights in one tiny little area, just to add some shape and prevent the flat look that one big bright light can give.

                          Pay attention to each room and where you'd like to lead the player. In a dark room, draw their attention to doorways with some light spilling in. In a bright room, add shadowy areas for contrast.

                          Once you've shaped your environment, add complimentary colors sparingly. For example, let's say you're working in a warm color space, adding some greenish-blue lights here and there - where they fit, obviously, a random green light against a wall might look odd - adds visual interest and helps the opposing color to pop.

                          You might also consider looking at your map and identifying it's key spaces. Some maps have an indoor and an outdoor area. Some have the upstairs and the downstairs. Some have techno-theme connected to cave-theme. It can sometimes work really well to main-light these opposing areas with complimentary color spaces. So your blue-ish techno base leads into brownish/orange cave spaces, for example.

                          The important thing to realise is that the lighting of the environment is just as big a job as modeling and texturing all the assets. I'm a firm believer that good use of lighting can make anything look brilliant, while bad use of lighting will not save the greatest meshes and textures from looking garbage.

                          If you'd like some links on color or lighting theory, PM me

                          Comment


                            #14
                            It's very unoriginal. Everyone can come up with this. I've played to many maps with identical design. I give it a 5/10.

                            PS: Remember, this is just ONE opinion.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by JelleRogermees View Post
                              It's very unoriginal. Everyone can come up with this. I've played to many maps with identical design. I give it a 5/10.

                              PS: Remember, this is just ONE opinion.
                              If that were true, then everyone would be mapping

                              I don't think a map necessarily needs to break new ground or reinvent the wheel in order to be successful. If it plays well, then it serves as nothing more than a mini labyrinth in which you get to blow up your friends (or competitors), which in the end is the whole purpose for almost any map (excluding maps that are just showcasing pretties, irrespective of gameplay).

                              The important thing is that people are contributing to the success of this community by offering hours of their time (and sweat and tears) in order to provide the community with free extensions to the game.

                              You're entitled to your opinion, obviously, and constructive criticism is good for anyone - I doubt any designer would argue about that. But the key word is constructive.

                              There's a big difference to saying "It's unoriginal, anyone could come up with this" than saying, for example, "I find the layout to be too repetetive, perhaps some more verticle space would help".

                              While I don't think there's a problem with simply expressing your negative thoughts without constructive feedback, the author is more likely to respect your opinion (and take your suggestions on board) if you are constructive.

                              Comment

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