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    Dedicated server - How do you start it?

    I downloaded the dedicated server from one of the link in the sticky.

    I extracted the files from the .rar file and ran the setup.

    After the setup was complete, there were no shortcuts made in my start menu or desktop.

    I searched windows explorer and went to the c:/program files folder and went to the dedicated server directory. I searched for the UT3.exe file and double clicked this to run it.

    The program showed the UT3 splash screen, then screen went black (like the game or server was starting) and after about 20 seconds of a black screen, the screen minimized, then closed itself and thats it.

    Nothing else happens.

    I am running this on a laptop, dual core 1.8 GHZ machine as a test server to test some configurations before I get a rental server and pay for it.

    Any ideas?

    Thanks

    #2
    Read this.

    Comment


      #3
      You may also want to check out this post I've been working on on my forums for installing the Windows package and patch and bonus pack and using -nohomedir to keep configs out of the My Documents folder structure.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Slaughter View Post
        and using -nohomedir to keep configs out of the My Documents folder structure.
        You say that like ti's a good thing...

        Please, people really need to unlearn the habit of doing everyday computer work/play with admin privileges.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by NakedApe View Post
          You say that like ti's a good thing...

          Please, people really need to unlearn the habit of doing everyday computer work/play with admin privileges.
          Your obvious and gratiuitous M$ security jab aside, I do say it because it is a good thing IF you are going to run a server. But also, if you had read my setup thread you'd see that I clearly state it is one man's preference.

          My follow up thread will be how to run multiple servers from the install that was created using. It is much easier to do with -nohomedir (and the -configsubdir parm). Keeping things in My Docs one would need to use the buggy -GameIni= and -EngineIni= parameters and it is messy.

          But, how about offering up a detailed set of instructions to show people how to do it your way without "admin privileges"? That would include how to set up a separate user account, what privileges to assign to it, setting up the server and running it.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Slaughter View Post
            Your obvious and gratiuitous M$ security jab aside,
            Actually, I was acknowledging that Microsoft is finally making some good progress towards a more secure environment and what I was jabbing at was people who make this more difficult due to laziness or lack of understanding.

            Originally posted by Slaughter View Post
            But also, if you had read my setup thread you'd see that I clearly state it is one man's preference.
            I read no such thing. Your post says it is "just long and messy" and -nohomedir is just "much better". And even if this is just "one mans preference" it still needs to be addressed since it is not good advice.

            Originally posted by Slaughter View Post
            It is much easier to do with -nohomedir (and the -configsubdir parm). Keeping things in My Docs one would need to use the buggy -GameIni= and -EngineIni= parameters and it is messy.
            That is because Epic has yet to fix the bug that causes -configsubdir= to not work unless -nohomedir is also specified. And the problem is moot if you run servers under separate users which should be the norm for hosted services anyway.

            Originally posted by Slaughter View Post
            But, how about offering up a detailed set of instructions to show people how to do it your way without "admin privileges"? That would include how to set up a separate user account, what privileges to assign to it, setting up the server and running it.
            No, I'm one of the elitist ******** that think that people should actually learn how to handle administration of their systems before trying to host services to the general public. Unless someone is willing to pay me for educating these users my input will be limited to pointing out when bad advice is given.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by NakedApe View Post
              Actually, I was acknowledging that Microsoft is finally making some good progress towards a more secure environment and what I was jabbing at was people who make this more difficult due to laziness or lack of understanding.

              Roger on the MS progress. Well, I don't know if you've set up a UT3 server or not, but with the effort level compared to UT2004, the word "lazy" doesn't apply.

              I read no such thing. Your post says it is "just long and messy" and -nohomedir is just "much better". And even if this is just "one mans preference" it still needs to be addressed since it is not good advice.

              You are correct. I didn't use the work "preference" in my thread.

              "This is one man's tale of installing the server package, latest patch, bonus pack and WebAdmin in a Windows-based evironment. Granted this is not necessarily the best or only way of doing this."


              That is because Epic has yet to fix the bug that causes -configsubdir= to not work unless -nohomedir is also specified. And the problem is moot if you run servers under separate users which should be the norm for hosted services anyway.

              So, until (and IF) that is fixed then -configsubdir and -nohomedir is really the best and the least buggy method.

              Besides, was "hosted services" mentioned anywhere? That's not what my little guide is about. It's to help people who might want to be setting it up on their own machines or servers they've built for their own use.


              No, I'm one of the elitist ******** that think that people should actually learn how to handle administration of their systems before trying to host services to the general public. Unless someone is willing to pay me for educating these users my input will be limited to pointing out when bad advice is given.
              With as difficult as this as is evident by the threads in this forum, I'll stick to being helpful. While it may be the "bad advice" method as far as ultra security goes and it certainly is for hosted services; it is practical for most regular users and it certainly works.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Slaughter View Post
                Roger on the MS progress. Well, I don't know if you've set up a UT3 server or not, but with the effort level compared to UT2004, the word "lazy" doesn't apply.
                I have. And I did not find one bit harder than UT2k4 from a system administrative viewpoint. This is not a UT3 issue, it is a Windows "modus operandi" issue, brought into focus by Epics decision to do the right thing regarding user owned data. It's not Microsofts fault, it's not Epics fault, they are both doing what has to be done. It's users who just refuses to learn and adapt to the new way. To me that is "lazy".

                Originally posted by Slaughter View Post
                So, until (and IF) that is fixed then -configsubdir and -nohomedir is really the best and the least buggy method.
                No, the best method is to run one server per user, with documents in the proper--non-privileged user owned--location.

                Originally posted by Slaughter View Post
                Besides, was "hosted services" mentioned anywhere? That's not what my little guide is about. It's to help people who might want to be setting it up on their own machines or servers they've built for their own use.
                "Hosted service" was used in the meaning "a software service running on a computer". I do not make any distinction between a server run by a private person and a server run by a game server provider.

                Originally posted by Slaughter View Post
                With as difficult as this as is evident by the threads in this forum, I'll stick to being helpful. While it may be the "bad advice" method as far as ultra security goes and it certainly is for hosted services; it is practical for most regular users and it certainly works.
                This is not "ultra security", this is "minimum security".

                Comment


                  #9
                  Okay, then. I get your point and your preference and really don't want to argue. I would respectfully suggest that to be helpful (and that is what the point of this forum is about, isn't it?), that you make an exception and go open source as it were, and offer up some free directions so people can run their little game service in the proper, minimum security method.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Slaughter View Post
                    Okay, then. I get your point and your preference and really don't want to argue. I would respectfully suggest that to be helpful (and that is what the point of this forum is about, isn't it?), that you make an exception and go open source as it were, and offer up some free directions so people can run their little game service in the proper, minimum security method.
                    I'm not witholding anything. The game does it right by default.

                    All you need to do is create a non-privileged user (not a member of the Administrators group) per server instance and start the server running as this user by either starting it as a service owned by the user, adding it to the users Autostart scripts or starting it using RunAs.

                    Once Epic fixes the -nohomedir/-configsubdir bug you can run multiple servers under one user identity if this is desirable.

                    The problem with running with -nohomedir is that you need to give the server process write access to the install directory. This means changing the ACLs on the install directory or, more commonly, running the server as a privileged user. Changing ACLs is OK if you feel comfortable with it but the second approach means that if an exploit is found in your UT3 server, the attacker immediately gets admin (transparently in XP, in Vista I'm not sure if UAC can help*). If you run as a non-privileged user, they get no access beyond what you've given by ACLs (which should be "nothing" if you don't use -nohomedir) and can't elevate to admin unless they know the password of a privileged user.

                    While I understand that the migration from always-admin, to only-admin-when-necessary is going to be painful for Windows users, mainly due to poorly written third-party software, I see no reason to not "do the right thing" with the applications that actually let you. Less pain when the crunch comes...

                    *UAC can probably prevent tampering with the system but it isn't likely to prevent access to your personal data.

                    EDIT: This by no means the only way to solve the problem. But I consider it the most relevant for your "target audience".

                    Comment

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