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changing pivot during brush -> smesh conversion

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    changing pivot during brush -> smesh conversion

    I just made this very simple plank in Ued, and I converted it to a static mesh. All went well, except that the static mesh's pivot point is slightly different than that of the static mesh, resulting in a plank that's just a little bit off the grid. That in turn results in a lot more work getting it right.
    Anyone know what I can do to prevent this pivotpoint from magically placing itself whereever it pleases?

    And please, no "Maya/3DSMax > Ued" replies. I'm aware of Ued's shortcomings when it comes to static meshes, but my shortcomings in maya are far greater.

    #2
    From my experience, the pivot point for a static mesh converted in UT is the same as the last pivot point prior to converting it. In other words, set your pivot point before converting it to a static mesh and the static mesh will keep the same pivot point.

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      #3
      Also, you don't really need to worry about being on the Grid for StaticMeshes, especially if you are not working with a set of StaticMeshes that join together(like a walkway for eg). So you can turn snapping off and move it to your liking.

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        #4
        Very true. You don't even need to snap your meshes to the grid. I assume that you are using the pivot point because your static mesh is a mover. Having a good pivot point on a mover can make a mover that rotates look realistic, whereas a bad pivot point will make it look like :down:

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          #5
          Let me specify:
          It's not a mover or anything, just a simple plank. When it's still a brush (or 4 brushes actually) I perfectly place the pivot. Then I convert the brushes and the statis mesh's pivot is a couple UUs off.
          And I'm not one for free hand smesh movement. I'm a perfectionist, plus the plank fits a certain area perfectly and if it's even a single UU off, it won't look right.

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            #6
            Well theres several ways to do it!

            But the pivot needs to be set just prior to making the static.

            I would make the multi piece brush and convert to it static first so you got 1 piece.

            Then place that static in the level and convert it back to brush.

            Then do an add brush so you now got 1 brush.

            Then open that brushes properties and go to display/PrePivot.

            In there adjust the X Y and Z to values which move the pivot precisely where you want. Try 5 and or -5 ect ect ect.

            Then after you got that pivot exactly where you want do a geo build then convert it back to static same package you had before!

            Like I said theres several ways to do it but I have used this method and others. You can do it in the static mesh itself but after you set the pre pivot you need to convert that static to static again! GOOD LUCK!!

            New map VCTF-0AQUANITE is ready.....

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              #7
              Worked like a charm.

              Thx!

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                #8
                Just curious, why are you converting it to a static mesh rather than using BSP?

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                  #9
                  Several reasons: first of all I'm using the same thing quite a few times, so I *think* using smeshes is less of a strain on the system. I also want to prevent eventual texture problems: remembering to correctly rescale and eventually move a texture if it's been changed is a real pain.
                  The main reason however is that I was using another static mesh, but I decided to change it with something I made myself. Manually replacing each smesh would be hell, but I made sure my new plank had the same dimensions and pivot point as the old one, and then I selected all the smeshes that needed changing ("select all matching static meshes") and changed the name of the static mesh, thus easily replacing the old smesh with the new. It's a really nice trick, cause it enables you to use temporary meshes and switch them with other meshes (with same sizes and pivot) at a later stage.

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                    #10
                    I hate to break it to you, but static meshes should never be made from BSP.

                    This is why: http://angelmapper.com/tutorials/uedmeshes.htm

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                      #11
                      don't you worry, I'm aware of that. However, my static mesh was hardly worthy of the name: it's a plank. I took 4 cubic shapes and connected them to (I hope) simulate the tesselated effect of decently made static meshes, and although it results in several more polys, the difference is minimal. I'm not planning on learning maya any time soon (like I said in the first post, it's a lengthy process), so I'll make do with my Ued meshes.

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                        #12
                        Thats fine. Just consider that if you ever get the chance to switch them with a mesh created with Maya it will be an upgrade.

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                          #13
                          Very true, but maya scares me. I opened it up once and I was lucky to close it alive... so **** complicated.

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by Ryandar
                            Very true, but maya scares me. I opened it up once and I was lucky to close it alive... so **** complicated.
                            It is worth knowing. Do the Tutorials included with Maya(assume PLE) you can start with the little pop up window when it starts. Learn how to do the basic Zomm In/Out, Rotate View, Select, etc first, that makes a big difference in understanding how everything works. Also goto 3DBuzz and checkout the VTMs(after Registration) for Maya and especially the ones in the Unreal Technology section. It'll take 1 week to a month of doing Tutorials before you'll get skilled with Maya, but the need for Maya(or other Modeling program) will only increase if you want to Map in the future.

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                              #15
                              Originally posted by NiTrOcALyPsE
                              I hate to break it to you, but static meshes should never be made from BSP.

                              This is why: http://angelmapper.com/tutorials/uedmeshes.htm
                              For complex objects, yes, as Angel so well describes. However, for trivial objects the result is identical. A maya-built plank (presuming it's a simple rectangle) will have 6 faces = 12 triangles. A brush->static mesh conversion will have 12 triangles too. Give the result a box-collision and the static mesh should, at least in theory, be faster than the brush, and certainly so if you have more than one occurrence in the map.

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