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Map Piracy [Resolved-*Lock me*]

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  • replied
    Quick question about those textures you created in Photoshop...

    Without jumping to any conclusions, did you actually pay the $600 for your photoshop license?

    It seems an awful lot of people are using what is a rather expensive and, for most, an unaffordable application ...and if so then surely all arguments are out the window


    //devil's advocate mode off

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by DrSiN
    When you create an original work, it is your intellectual property.

    .....

    As for the work you do becoming the property of Epic. This is completely untrue. First off the EULA could never be used to force assignment of ownership and you DO own your IP.

    ........

    .... since it’s your IP, we can’t just snatch it up and sell it or use it without your permission.

    Hmmmm.....

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    BBQSCUDBUTT should be utan banned. He banned me from his server for speed hacking when I did a piston jump.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by Desp#2
    For example copying Magma will always be Magma and everyone will know that map is from Shane.
    That makes no sense at all. Shane is an epic employee, Magama is a retail map. Of course people might recognize meshes from it but this does not apply to the average joe who nobody knows. Most of the time most people have no clue who created what in a map, they just assume it was created by the person listed as the author.

    Originally posted by Desp#2
    Learning is using other elements and creating something diff because nothing is 100% new. Not saying theft is right but in some cases it is a process of learning.
    Nonsense once again. You don't have to steal meshes to learn, AND you certainly don't have to RELEASE a map with stolen meshes. Use the maps that came with the game if you want to learn or go read a tutorial

    Original custom content will be extremely rare in UT2007 since there is no protection provided. I pity the fool who builds a much higher quality map than anything released from Epic and who does the workload of an entire crew of people getting paid, and then gets his work stolen and other people take credit for his labor . Then he has to listen to comments like: "well its for the good of the community and the map ripper was just learning".

    This is not a big concern unless you are trying to build up a free and large mod community. UT2007 will not have one - at least not one where there is original custom made content

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by Desp#2
    Gah… Ill just make my next work Public Domain…

    The best way to prevent theft is by making designs that are freeform instead of repeated theme throughout the whole map. For example copying Magma will always be Magma and everyone will know that map is from Shane. The more freeform the design style is, the less people will want to copy sections form it for use on other maps because it makes it so much harder.

    Still to date I have had people asking me if they can use the Skaarj set… I always say sure go right ahead but it is not really mine anymore. Plus the initial design style was from Shane and other people in Epic… I just recreated with the past ideas that were supplied.

    Everyone who has contacted me for some staticmeshs I made or anything. Even the bigger staticmeshs that pretty much represent a level I give permission to. Because I know at the end that I made that mesh and nobody else will really be able to claim it. I have also had countless people use a tiled texture that got released with DM-Nirvana without my permission and I do not care. It is actually fun seeing those things happen.

    I believe I heard a line somewhere… “If I have inspired someone in any way or form, that is more rewarding than anything else in my life” I am still a copycat of old artist some dead or alive. Learning is using other elements and creating something diff because nothing is 100% new. Not saying theft is right but in some cases it is a process of learning.
    That is probably the best post I've read on this site. :up:

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Gah… Ill just make my next work Public Domain…

    The best way to prevent theft is by making designs that are freeform instead of repeated theme throughout the whole map. For example copying Magma will always be Magma and everyone will know that map is from Shane. The more freeform the design style is, the less people will want to copy sections form it for use on other maps because it makes it so much harder.

    Still to date I have had people asking me if they can use the Skaarj set… I always say sure go right ahead but it is not really mine anymore. Plus the initial design style was from Shane and other people in Epic… I just recreated with the past ideas that were supplied.

    Everyone who has contacted me for some staticmeshs I made or anything. Even the bigger staticmeshs that pretty much represent a level I give permission to. Because I know at the end that I made that mesh and nobody else will really be able to claim it. I have also had countless people use a tiled texture that got released with DM-Nirvana without my permission and I do not care. It is actually fun seeing those things happen.

    I believe I heard a line somewhere… “If I have inspired someone in any way or form, that is more rewarding than anything else in my life” I am still a copycat of old artist some dead or alive. Learning is using other elements and creating something diff because nothing is 100% new. Not saying theft is right but in some cases it is a process of learning.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Wait, are you even a mapper? :bulb:

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  • replied
    Originally posted by Angel_Mapper
    Yes, because a one minute email to the person to ask permission to use their stuff is SOOOO difficult.
    Maybe it is, and so what? Anybody that pays any attention knows where it came from and it's generally of no commercial value anyway, except insofar as it might help you get a real job somewhere.

    You can't accomplish anything by making an issue out of this, other than to discourage the amateurs the forms were created for from getting involved in the first place.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    The IALOL (International Association of Laughing Out Loud) has granted this thread a level rating of 9.0.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Re: Re: The Real Deal On Copyrights and Intellectual Property...

    Originally posted by Angel_Mapper
    Most map hosting sites will remove maps with ripped content.
    Hey Rachel!

    Yes, of course, you are correct about that. Any way you can think of to publically flog the perp on-line is fair game as far as I'm concerned.

    I remember how we all reacted when some idiot was selling our levels on eBay...:haha:

    -Toonces

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Re: The Real Deal On Copyrights and Intellectual Property...

    Originally posted by Toonces T. Cat
    The bottom-line is that you have every right to be angry. Just don't look for any other form of satisfaction or recourse as it's not gonna happen for you...Sorry, but that's just the way it is.
    Most map hosting sites will remove maps with ripped content.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    The Real Deal On Copyrights and Intellectual Property...

    Yikes!!! I don't think I've seen this much misinformation in a thread...Ever!

    Here is the end-all and be-all of copyrights and intellectual property rights in the U.S. summed up in one word...LAWYERS

    Right or wrong, if you don't have a certified great white shark of an attorney to work your case...who also happens to specialize in the area...you won't have an icecube's chance in Hell of getting any satisfaction. These guys are money driven and you will not find them hanging around in the local ACLU or legal aid office.

    How do I know this? Well, for those of you that don't know me, I am considerably older than most of you and I happen to work at a fairly large University that is a component of a gigantic University System. We employee 53 full-time attorneys in our System Office of General Counsel and a large number of them specialize in the above fields along with patent law. When any employee creates anything on the University's equipment and clock, the school shares the ownership with the creator. All the details are worked out in writing with the lawyers. Now, of course, this means the school gets part of the money. It also means that if anyone is stupid enough to plagiarize your material they will not be dealing with you alone, but also with the all legal forces of Hell.

    Without that sort of protection, you are basically screwed if someone takes your stuff unless you are Bill Gates and can buy your own lawyer. No, it doesn't make it right. It's just how it is in real life. Your only real recourse is to do exactly what you have done here by exposing the nasty little ***** for the thief that he is...or if you know where he lives I suppose you could go stick an icepick in his tires...

    The bottom-line is that you have every right to be angry. Just don't look for any other form of satisfaction or recourse as it's not gonna happen for you...Sorry, but that's just the way it is.

    -Toonces

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Yes, because a one minute email to the person to ask permission to use their stuff is SOOOO difficult.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    The attraction of a set of tools like this as provided by Epic is that it allows amateurs to express themselves, maybe even develop some talent, for the reward of maybe seeing their work get used in the so called community.

    That's what this is, amateur hour. If you want to, you can bellyache and agitate for your "rights" as regards what you do with the stuff Epic sold you, but for one thing I'd be surprised if this eventuality hasn't been forseen and planned for (and if it wasn't, it should have been), and for another, there's no way you're going to get any real popular participation in these forms if you start trying to hogtie everybody that has an ounce of interest in them with a whole lot of legal red tape about what they're allowed to do. Which would destroy the whole point of Epic making the tools available in the first place.

    If you want rights for your content, get a real job. Commercial art has got to be one of the biggest industries in the universe by now. There sure as hell is enough of it anyway. Go work making that stuff and find out how swell real artists get treated, whatever rights they have.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Stealing someone's work isn't right - it's that simple. Look all you want. Borrow with permission. Sadly, some people have no couth and think it's perfectly acceptable to help themselves to other people's work.. I'd compare it to lego mapping-- plugging in whatever they steal from elsewhere.

    Another thing that should be simple:

    your != you're

    And ffs, stop with what DrSin said.. if the actual meaning is lost on you, arguing about the words won't help.

    Leave a comment:

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