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    PING & Bandwidth

    Excuse the noob question...

    Does the bandwidth speed affect ping?



    I have to choose between a

    1.2 Mbps (1200 Kbps) dowload and 256 Kbps in upload

    and a

    4 Mbps in download e 256 Kbps in upload.



    Are there some differences?
    Can I have a PING improvement if I choose the 4Mbps?


    thanks in advance.

    #2
    ping will likely not be affected by choosing either of these connections.. both are decent and should be sufficient to mask any variations...geography will play a much bigger role..

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Frogger
      ping will likely not be affected by choosing either of these connections.. both are decent and should be sufficient to mask any variations...geography will play a much bigger role..
      +1

      both those speeds are plenty enough to play the game well, just depends on ISP and as frogger mentions, geography :up:

      Comment


        #4
        I'd say go for the 4Mbit down (translates to 512Kilobyte speeds)
        Also, if you can somehow get a faster upload, that will help a bit too

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Kel
          I'd say go for the 4Mbit down (translates to 512Kilobyte speeds)
          Also, if you can somehow get a faster upload, that will help a bit too
          I have 100k upload and i normally use teamspeak, i have no problems

          Comment


            #6
            A decent way to sometimes think about it is:

            Ping is how fast the data goes from Point A to Point B

            Bandwidth is how much data there is per each Ping load, or how much data the line can carry as a whole at any one given time, really

            kinda, sorta, don't argue with me people.

            Your two connections there are just varients of changing the up/down bandwidth; nothing really talking about ping. And as aforementioned, ping is majorly going to be based off geographical location. But for what it's worth, I'd get the more download speed if you can. woot!

            Both will be great for you. Looks like #2 is just a nicer package. #1 you'll still be just fine, considering I doubt many over few download servers are going to let you take data from them much faster than that anyways. (so their bandwidth isn't swamped by just you)

            Comment


              #7
              Your packetloss is more likely to be affected by your band width, but while ping can be affected (since UT deals with larger packets), the size of both those connections are relativle unnoticable (since the smaller is large enough)

              Comment


                #8
                4 Mbit is better for gaming. Why? You can (potentially) download maps much faster. Pingwise, you may or may not (most likely not) notice a difference, and if you do, it will be minute. The upstream limit is the same, so in this case, I think you will not notice any difference.

                Comment


                  #9
                  PlayerPawn is right. Ping deals with the latency (how long it takes to go from one point to another) and bandwidth deals with capacity, or how much can be transferred "at once" (technically over a set interval, but close enough). Ping is virtually entirely dependant on the location of you in relation to the server, so going with either option should give you the same ping. The only benefit to the bigger pipe will be possible faster downloads and less likely packet loss. However, both options seem sufficient enough that packet loss should only depend on the server.

                  There really was no reason for me to reiterate what everyone said, but I figured I would throw my two cents in.


                  *crawls back into the shadows*

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Ping is how long in MicroSeconds it takes to send a request and get a response back. For example "Gaming Computer A" sends a request to "Server B", and 100MS later gets a response back. Basically anything 512kbps and greater will be enough that you won't notice much difference in ping. As was said before, your geographical location matters more. Or rather, how many hops you have to the closest major backbone. Even dialup can get a decent ping. But most online games have a packet size far too large for dialup, and so it's extremely slow. Also, dialup usually has at least one more hop to the big backbone.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I assume you are talking about comcast having the 4.0 down. Be careful with them right now because they are having severe latency (ping) problems in SOME areas especially in Cali, Utah, PA, TX....for those that I know of. There seems to be some networking problems or overcongested nodes. I happen to be trying out speakeasy dsl this coming month because comcast won't acknowledge the problem of ping spikes during prime time gaming hours (I have suffered through as much as 500ms in some games.. of course I quit). Don't rely on advertisements... do the research on the ISPs you are considering before you fork out some serious cheddar for connection fees. Personally if all goes well with speakeasy I will sacrifice my 4/512 for 1.5/384 because UT has been virtually unplayable for a month now with comcrap (CONcast). DSL also seems to have more consistant/reliable pings than cable generally. I suggest checking out the forums and the reviews at

                      www.dslreports.com.

                      Good Luck

                      Comment


                        #12
                        ping is effected by the routing your isp uses and the distance from your home to the server you are playing on,you can have 100megs up and down and still ping like **** if you are not routed properly..find a friend or go to company headquarters and run some ping tests on your fav servers that will tell you what you can expect....

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by EndobioticChaos
                          Ping is how long in MicroSeconds it takes to send a request and get a response back. For example "Gaming Computer A" sends a request to "Server B", and 100MS later gets a response back.
                          Actually measuring ping in microseconds is silly. It's generally done in milliseconds, as in most cases your ping will vary a few milliseconds (a few thousand microseconds) every time you measure it simply due to processing time at the target and measuring inaccuracy.

                          By the way, the correct abbreviation for microseconds would be µs (or us, if you can't use a Mu sign µ), milliseconds is ms and Ms would be megaseconds.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Who the freak ever speaks in terms of megaseconds?

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Boksha
                              Actually measuring ping in microseconds is silly. It's generally done in milliseconds, as in most cases your ping will vary a few milliseconds (a few thousand microseconds) every time you measure it simply due to processing time at the target and measuring inaccuracy.

                              By the way, the correct abbreviation for microseconds would be µs (or us, if you can't use a Mu sign µ), milliseconds is ms and Ms would be megaseconds.
                              Thanks for that correction. I had thought that "ms" referred to milliseconds, but somewhere I thought I read that ping is measured in microseconds, which didn't make a whole lot of sense to me. Glad to get the confusion sorted out.

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