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CPU heatsinks, best for cooling?

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    #16
    OT : I just blow on my cpu when it gets too hot!

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      #17
      Neither. Get a Thermalright XP-90 or XP-120 depending on how much space you have in your case :up: . Then pick a fan, I'm using a Vantec Tornado myself.

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        #18
        Originally posted by Zygar
        Who said Thermaltake? I wish pain on you.

        Thermaltake coolers suck, they're noisy and not even that effective. Zalman are much better.
        My Thermaltake Silent Boost cools adequately and is very silent...

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          #19
          Originally posted by RuinerReptile
          Neither. Get a Thermalright XP-90 or XP-120 depending on how much space you have in your case :up: . Then pick a fan, I'm using a Vantec Tornado myself.
          Exactly what I said. I run the XP-90 and 92mm Tornado as well. Sounds like a hair dryer, but ya can't argue with 120cfm. :noob:

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            #20
            hey its kid!! how are you doing today?

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              #21
              Thermaltake's ****. Zalman aren't bad if you want something quiet, but forget it if it's performance you're after.

              As others have said; it's all about Thermalright.

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                #22
                There's not enough information to make a recommendation. What CPU are you using or planning to use? Mobo? Case? What cards (VC, SC, etc...)? What kind of RAM? how many hard drives? Are you going to overclock?

                You sould build a complete system instead of just throwing parts together. The choice of cooler is determined by the parts around it and the system configuration.

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by ch41nbr8kr
                  There's not enough information to make a recommendation. What CPU are you using or planning to use? Mobo? Case? What cards (VC, SC, etc...)? What kind of RAM? how many hard drives? Are you going to overclock?

                  You sould build a complete system instead of just throwing parts together. The choice of cooler is determined by the parts around it and the system configuration.
                  Im in the midst of putting together a new system, Ill be going PCI-E this time round.
                  It will be an AMD64 3500+ CPU and probably a Gigabyte K8NXP-9 nForce4 Ultra mobo, Jeantech Phoong case, Leadtek GeForce 6800 256MB PCI-E card, not sure what RAM since I will be reusing the stuff that came with my PC (1GB DDR333) till I can upgrade it, 2 hard drives, not overclocking

                  Unfortunatly its gonna be about £700

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                    #24
                    I went with this.
                    My AMD Barton 3200 runs around 37 C on idle and about 39 C on full cpu load, and it is very quiet. I'm loving the heat pipe technology. Oh, yeah, I also use Artic Silver instead of the factory paste.

                    The other thing I like about this cooler is that the intake fan pulls air right over my memory, so that helps to keep the ram running a bit cooler as well.

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                      #25
                      Originally posted by Spaz007
                      AMD Stock

                      I never understood why anyone needs to spent extra on a heat sink since the stock model does its job just fine. Unless you are going to OC'ing something.

                      A avg CPU temp limit is around 160F (71C). I'm getting 122F (50C) which is well within the limit. Even during the summer I never went over 130F (54C).
                      I agree.

                      I have been able to overclock pretty aggressively with stock cooling going back to the pentium 3 days.

                      The one time I did get a third party cooler, I bought a thermaltake for my server. It was soooooo loud that I had to solder in a resistor to slow it down. I could hear it down the hall.

                      And, the cooling performance I get from stock air cooling is fine. Right now, my Athlon 64 2.2 GHz 3500+ is overclocked to 2.42 GHz (nothing insane I realize) and running at a cool 28 Degrees Celcius. Could I get 26 degrees with a 3rd party cooler? Maybe. My response...so?

                      I have never been hindered in overclocking or anything else with stock cooling. Yeah, it doesn't look as cool. But, it's cheaper. And, with a retail processor, I get a 3 year warranty and cool AMD64 sticker .

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                        #26
                        Well I just got to have one of these

                        http://www.thermalright.com/a_page/m...duct_xp120.htm

                        I don't know if it's any good for cooling a cpu, but dang what a phallic symbol.

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                          #27
                          I was thinking about getting one of those for my CPU too. My only concern with tha Zalman is the way it "splashes" the heat around. The heat coming off those copper fins are going to go in every direction and I know that right underneath the CPU is my graphics card, and I wouldn't want all that heat being pushed on to my card. Meanwhile the thermaltake you can direct with you want the heat too go. That would be my only concern with the Zalman.

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                            #28
                            Originally posted by SJAndrew
                            I agree.

                            I have been able to overclock pretty aggressively with stock cooling going back to the pentium 3 days.

                            The one time I did get a third party cooler, I bought a thermaltake for my server. It was soooooo loud that I had to solder in a resistor to slow it down. I could hear it down the hall.

                            And, the cooling performance I get from stock air cooling is fine. Right now, my Athlon 64 2.2 GHz 3500+ is overclocked to 2.42 GHz (nothing insane I realize) and running at a cool 28 Degrees Celcius. Could I get 26 degrees with a 3rd party cooler? Maybe. My response...so?

                            I have never been hindered in overclocking or anything else with stock cooling. Yeah, it doesn't look as cool. But, it's cheaper. And, with a retail processor, I get a 3 year warranty and cool AMD64 sticker .
                            I hear ya. My problem came from my mobo's manufacturer. My temps were running what I considered to be kind of high, around 55-60 C. So, I bought this new heat pipe. After I bought the darn thing, I found several articles stating that Gigabyte knowingly adjusts the bios temp reading for the cpu up by about 10 C, because they are getting the cpu temp directly from the die instead of the socket; socket temp source being the case for other mobos. I have seen many comparisons that show a 12 to 15 degree temp difference between my mobo and others in the same rig with all other components being the same. If I adjust for 15 difference, my cpu is running way cooler than my body temp.

                            Even though I'm using the heatpipe, the fans on it are extremely quiet.

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