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This is how Americas Army has been made

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    This is how Americas Army has been made

    That’s a pretty good brief description, but allow me to expand on it

    The US Army contracts the Unreal 2.x engine off of the guys who made the engine.
    The Army then sets their modelling team to work on creating army and opfor models, weapon models, in game assets (tables, chairs, etc) and other inordinate objects (cars, trucks, doors, computers, boxes, grenades etc)

    All of this is made off of a plan that the brain-stormers have done over the past (usually more than a year) of thinking and story boarding.

    These models come out in both a wire frame mode, and a 'grey-skinned' mode, just to give the shape of the model.

    At the same time this is happening, the art and sound team is out making artwork to skin the models, and sounds to fit into the game world. (User interface clicks, music, nature noises, soldier moving noises, footsteps, gun sounds, grenade sounds, commo sounds..And the art team designing and drawing 'skins' for all the models and assets)

    Once these are all compiled, they are then dumped back to the people in charge of putting it all together in a workable format. (Coders)

    All the while, the coders have been making a 'mainframe' or 'chassis' for the game to fit into. I.e. the menu, the in-game HUD, and all the actions and interactions. Mapping all the movements etc.

    Once the art (skins) have been drawn up, and the correct sounds for each action and reaction of the object have been compiled, the moddler/coder will attach them to each specific object.... this is laborious at times

    ...Once the finished product of the assets (rifles, game characters, voices etc) have been compiled, they are throw into the coders hands, and the coders place them together into the engine like a jig-saw puzzle, fitting in a basic char model for US army with model and skinned artwork with bone and physical attributes and sound properties here....and skinned tables that react with players by blocking them there..Etc.

    ..Now we have something that resembles a game. All that’s required now is some hefty and creative map making, using unreal ed (the map making tool)...followed by copious amounts of testing, feedback from testers, bug fixing, adding new features, testing, bug fixing, and adding new features till all that are needed for this set build are added...then we test it till we cant find any more bugs. (Or until there are no 'show stoppers')

    ...All in all, from start to finish, it takes anywhere from 2-5 years to get a product from the idea, to the game...and a lotta money and support.

    Games aren’t easy to make

    (If anyone out there is a Game dev, or software engineer, and ive missed something out in the production line then feel free to correct me )

    Hope that clears it up for you

    #2
    Wow, thats odd, after reading all that i still dont care.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by The5thviruz
      Wow, thats odd, after reading all that i still dont care.
      and yet you took the time to post, so you must care just a little bit

      Comment


        #4
        Ok, that's thrown me a bit, too. Was this meant as a reply to another post or a new topic? Either way it's an interesting read ... I'm just not sure why it's been posted

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by The5thviruz
          Wow, thats odd, after reading all that i still dont care.
          Good for you

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by N6CreepingDeath
            and yet you took the time to post, so you must care just a little bit
            ok just a little then :haha:

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by The5thviruz
              ok just a little then :haha:

              i knew it :P

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by [FnG] magnolia
                Ok, that's thrown me a bit, too. Was this meant as a reply to another post or a new topic? Either way it's an interesting read ... I'm just not sure why it's been posted
                The US Army contracts the Unreal 2.x engine off of the guys who made the engine.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: This is how Americas Army has been made

                  Originally posted by stts
                  These models come out in both a wire frame mode, and a 'grey-skinned' mode, just to give the shape of the model.
                  Remarks like that always make me wonder...
                  How the hell can a MODEL BE a wireframe or a grey-skinned model?
                  A model is a set of vertices and list of triangles (each triangle is described by three numbers, determining between which vertices it should be placed). Of course, there's more to a model than just that, there's also UV coordinates, probably some properties of the triangles... but the appearance of a model isn't a part of the model, it's part of the skin. Once you have a model you can display it any way you want, wireframed, grey-skinned, purple-with-a-yellow-stripe-skinned, cell-shaded, phong-shaded, whatever.

                  Still, it's a nice post. Even IF it was a bit "clueless-TV-guy" or "meant-for-a-clueless-target-audience" style.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: Re: This is how Americas Army has been made

                    Originally posted by Boksha
                    Remarks like that always make me wonder...
                    How the hell can a MODEL BE a wireframe or a grey-skinned model?
                    A model is a set of vertices and list of triangles (each triangle is described by three numbers, determining between which vertices it should be placed). Of course, there's more to a model than just that, there's also UV coordinates, probably some properties of the triangles... but the appearance of a model isn't a part of the model, it's part of the skin. Once you have a model you can display it any way you want, wireframed, grey-skinned, purple-with-a-yellow-stripe-skinned, cell-shaded, phong-shaded, whatever.

                    Still, it's a nice post. Even IF it was a bit "clueless-TV-guy" or "meant-for-a-clueless-target-audience" style.
                    Y'know Boksha, Epic should hire you

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: Re: Re: This is how Americas Army has been made

                      Originally posted by [FnG] Lazz
                      Y'know Boksha, Epic should hire you
                      I'll second that! :up:
                      Out of all the people on this board I think Boksha knows more about the engine than just about anyone else!:bulb: :up:

                      But the question is, what would his job title/requirement be?

                      Perhaps coding certain sections? Testing?

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I'd be glad to sit on my behind a lot.
                        But seriously, knowing a lot about the game is not quite the same as being a good coder. Knowing the code is like knowing lots of different kinds of paint and brushes: it doesn't make you a painter yet.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Here is a link getting an inside look at the different steps game developers took to help make America's Army one of the most realistic games around.

                          Motion capture - white markers are attached to specific points on a person's body.

                          3D wireframe - Using photographs as a reference, game designers are able to create 3D wireframe models of aircraft and vehicles.

                          Check this link - http://www.goarmy.com/aarmy/realism.jsp

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Well, it's only logical they refer to it as a "Wireframe" to it in PR stuff. After all, wireframe sounds a lot better than "set of vertices and triangles" and more importantly you can't show a picture of the latter.
                            You still need a triangulated model to make a wireframe tho', because otherwise you wouldn't know where the lines of the wireframe would go.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Re: This is how Americas Army has been made

                              Originally posted by stts

                              ...All in all, from start to finish, it takes anywhere from 2-5 years to get a product from the idea, to the game...and a lotta money and support.
                              He, incredible. I remember the good old day of the Spectrum and c64, one guy one game

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