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    #31
    Originally posted by Moos3d
    Actually it does a decent job of cooling the components. It doesn't do much worse than any all-in-one kit which is what he needs unless he creates something almost as clunky as a dual cascade system which would defeat the purpose of a small LAN case. Also it is designed to work with only the CPU right out of the box, but there is nothing stopping you from cooling the NB/GPU/whatever. Also the fan on it can run at 3 levels and from what I have seen there isn't a large amount of difference between the 3 levels. It's probably one of the best choices he has for external water cooling.
    2nd and 3rd are really noisy...even the first is a bit annoying...changing fan would just be a suggestion I'd make, and it's easy to do. I'd recommend calling CoolerMaster before buying becasue they are supposed to be coming out with a more beefed up unit...may even address the fan noise issue they themselves are aware about. But all in all its a very sleek, compact design. Setup is simple, and it's a cheap solution if you want to get into moderate overclocking of the CPU only as well.

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      #32
      Originally posted by The5thviruz
      :bulb: :bulb: :bulb:
      No, I'm not crazy. I priced a system out at Danger Den, and it came out to be more expensive. Of course, that was because I wanted the best of everything. I would have felt bad if I would have cheaped out.

      It would have looked like *** though, I agree.

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        #33
        Originally posted by -=:Leor:=-
        2nd and 3rd are really noisy...even the first is a bit annoying...changing fan would just be a suggestion I'd make, and it's easy to do. I'd recommend calling CoolerMaster before buying becasue they are supposed to be coming out with a more beefed up unit...may even address the fan noise issue they themselves are aware about.
        Do you own the unit? Vantec stealth fan is 21dB. I happen to own 6 of them and I know that when you run a single stealth it is really as close to silent as any decent fan will get. The CM fan is supposed to be around 22dB. I don't think it will be that much loud. Especially compared to running a desk fan next to it. Also about the danger den stuff, there is no need for a silver waterblock. The difference is very little and also stuff like the triple/dual blackice aren't really needed. I'm assuming you used those though since they are the best/most expensive.

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          #34
          One way or the other it's gonna be quieter than this **** Intel HSF...

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            #35
            On your mainboard you should worry about the voltage regulators/condensators temperature.

            In most cases they should do well even with 80°C (if your board manufacturer did not use cheap ones)
            But: the hotter they get, the shorter they will live (so having a case fan in a water cooled system is a valid think-about).

            Remember: These parts are also used inside a power supply and some of the better ones can even take 120°C.

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              #36
              Originally posted by Moos3d
              Do you own the unit? Vantec stealth fan is 21dB. I happen to own 6 of them and I know that when you run a single stealth it is really as close to silent as any decent fan will get. The CM fan is supposed to be around 22dB. I don't think it will be that much loud. Especially compared to running a desk fan next to it. Also about the danger den stuff, there is no need for a silver waterblock. The difference is very little and also stuff like the triple/dual blackice aren't really needed. I'm assuming you used those though since they are the best/most expensive.
              I've got 2 Vantec Stealth fans...they were better than what I had when I first bought them, but they had a definate (though mild) "humm" to them. I stumbled across the Panaflow "Lows" and was amazed at how much more quiet they were, while pushing the same CFM. If you have a quiet system to start with, and move to the Panaflow "Low" you will hear a noticable difference compared to the Stealths...which by comparison really aren't stealthy at all. I've learned to never judge a fan by it's rating on paper...nothing beats a real-life test. Case-in-point is the stock CoolerMaster fan that comes with this unit...they are simply awful. And ya, I was testing one of these units for about a week...online review sites say the same, and CM themselves are aware of the problem. Again, very well polished unit overall, and a great, relatively cheap alternative to air - I would recommend it as long as you're not a hard-core overclocker...but changing the fan would be the first thing I'd do with it. If you want to go Panaflow, you'll need to get the "medium" because the "low" will set off the RPM alarm (regardless of fan speed setting) and there's no way you can disable it - this is annoying as hell because I found the "low" to be adequate for normal-use cooling.


              Leor

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                #37
                Originally posted by Layziepop01
                Alot of people would say that, but my prescott is just NOT as hot as the reviews say it is. I did my own test. with an AC I got my room down to 65*F, then I blew my desk fan through it by the AC, and at complete idle, the CPU was jumping between 27*C and 32*C. At full load it never went over 50*C.

                I think water cooling it, with something GOOD, would keep it under control.
                Actually it is, but with the proper cooling systems or dynamic airflow it not as hot as its supposed to be.

                Prescott 3.2 GHz 3.8 GHz overclocked, runs in the mid to the high 50's normally.

                Although the prescott should only be used if you know what your doing with your fans. Airflow matters a great deal, blowing the heat away from your CPU just doesn't cut it, since the heats still in the case.


                Anyways general rule of thumb when its in the mid 60's in Celcius its running hot. Anything above that unless your CPU's built with something super you've got one melting CPU (its not the metals inside that count, its the small pieces that cant handel heat without being deformed.)

                Motherboards around 50's is hot. Remember the area around your CPU is running at 40's-60's (20's if you've got an old CPU.) That includes your motherboard. So far nothings happened has it? Although the parts you should be worrying about is your memory, and cards.

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                  #38
                  [shot]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v97/fiLa2/a3.jpg[/shot]



                  Liquid Cooling Systems Destroy Your Computer!

                  warpriest writes "A news flash in a dutch computer mag shows a few of the most famous liquid cooling systems put to the the test. All of them cool the cpu and the specified parts excellently to a temperature more then low enough. But what they don't show is the area that is not liquid cooled around the CPU socket can reach temperatures of up to 180 Celcius. This is the critical temperature in which certain elements start to melt on your motherboard.

                  The reason this only happens with liquid cooling systems is, that normaly a fan would blow air also sideways of the cpu. that amount of air is just enough to also cool the area around the cpu socket.

                  So ppl with liquid cooling bewarned...if you do not have case fans cooling your system certain parts of your motherboard which aren't covered by liquid cooling might fry!

                  Comment


                    #39
                    Originally posted by SonicBlaster200
                    Actually it is, but with the proper cooling systems or dynamic airflow it not as hot as its supposed to be.

                    Prescott 3.2 GHz 3.8 GHz overclocked, runs in the mid to the high 50's normally.

                    Although the prescott should only be used if you know what your doing with your fans. Airflow matters a great deal, blowing the heat away from your CPU just doesn't cut it, since the heats still in the case.


                    Anyways general rule of thumb when its in the mid 60's in Celcius its running hot. Anything above that unless your CPU's built with something super you've got one melting CPU (its not the metals inside that count, its the small pieces that cant handel heat without being deformed.)

                    Motherboards around 50's is hot. Remember the area around your CPU is running at 40's-60's (20's if you've got an old CPU.) That includes your motherboard. So far nothings happened has it? Although the parts you should be worrying about is your memory, and cards.


                    Basically, right now I'm screwed. I'm thinking I have to leave the sides off anyway...

                    Last night I ran Prime95 for 15 minutes with all the side panels on. CPU peaked at 63*C, MB at 50*C. The Intel HSF was unbearable at that temp however, and began madly whirring away at almost 5000RPM. I'd say it hit near 50-60dB.

                    Thank you for that good answer though, thats what I wanted to know. This became an issue for me when I first got this case. I booted it up, and within 10 minutes, my RAM was way too hot. Quite literally burning. So I came up with the idea of the desk fan. I let that blow on it for a while, and it kept my RAM ice cold to the touch. That led me to believe that I NEEDED airflow through my case, or my RAM was gonna explode.

                    But that **** fan blows more dust inside my case, and is louder than any HSF. So I'd like to just put the sides on and keep them there, but I'm afraid that I'm killing my brand new hardware. Like I said though, I think I'm stuck just keeping the sides off, even without the fan, because it's like an Easy Bake Oven in there all closed up!

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