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question to epic: why is ut2k4 5.5 gb when this is 96Kb and looks just as good?

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  • replied
    i dont think any of those demos look as good as ut. And compressed music like that sounds like **** compared to mp3s and those even lose some of the sound. Also the people above are right that it draws from already existing libraries. UT could have done the same if they put enough time but the game wouldnt look nearly as nice. Plus you have to factor in the readability of the code. It would make full conversion mods very hard to make.

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  • replied
    Originally posted by {DAM}MoxNix
    The creators of UT have allready spent over 5 years working on it.
    That's right.. and look how much they've created :bulb:

    That demo is nothing in comparison.

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  • replied
    Originally posted by TheGreatFoo
    Oh yeah, it hasn't been mentioned yet:

    The creators of that tiny demo file will have spent months and months, if not over a year, creating it.

    Apply that to a game as big as UT2004, and it would take a few generations.
    The creators of UT have allready spent over 5 years working on it.

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  • replied
    Originally posted by Layziepop01
    I think the point is, with the right code, you can fit games that look better than Quake I, and well, better than Unreal I into a package almost as small as Solitaire! So... how big would the file have to actually be to match UT2004? The load times might suck, but I bet with more optimizations they could make something pretty kick ***.
    Optimisations will take off 5% of the loading times.

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  • replied
    1) that game is CPU intensive
    2) it uses the directx lirbrary and cpu to render and draw everything on the fly...

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  • replied
    I played that thing referred to in the first post and quite frankly I didnt think it looked that good.

    Certainly not as good as those screenshots.

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  • replied
    That 96k game is only calling up craploads of stuff from the DX Libraries that is already on your computer. The whole game is actually many megs in size.

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  • replied
    UT2004 is 96k of art resources... but the FUN code module is what makes up for the rest of the 5GB



    [alpha=24] or not [/alpha]

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  • replied
    I think the point is, with the right code, you can fit games that look better than Quake I, and well, better than Unreal I into a package almost as small as Solitaire! So... how big would the file have to actually be to match UT2004? The load times might suck, but I bet with more optimizations they could make something pretty kick ***.

    *note* I havn't played it yet. My college rig just isn't fast enough. Looks great though.

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  • replied
    jesus, what is with you people, ***** moan whine ***** moan

    'EPIC, NASA HAS SPACE SHUTTLES WHY DONT YOO!!11oneone coleslaw!'

    they're a game company, not ****ing research scholars, get over it

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  • replied
    ut2004 has more models more maps
    more gametypes unreal ed!
    etc etc.

    the 96kb is just a demo with 8 bit textures etc etc
    less code!

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  • replied
    Originally posted by Saury
    hm ok, but as most computers nowadays have atleast 512 mb this shud not be too much of a problem shud it?
    or if it is, maybe this technique could be combined with those usually used by gamedevelopers?
    Actually its more likely most people have 40+ gig harddrives, so installing 5.5 gigs shouldn't be a problem. Where as waiting half an hour for a map to load using the same method as that demo you posted would be a problem.

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  • replied
    UT2k4 contains a hidden 5.4gb high resolution, widescreen porn epic called 'Flood' secretly stowed somewhere hidden in the game directory.

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  • replied
    Oh yeah, it hasn't been mentioned yet:

    The creators of that tiny demo file will have spent months and months, if not over a year, creating it.

    Apply that to a game as big as UT2004, and it would take a few generations.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by Saury
    hm ok, but as most computers nowadays have atleast 512 mb this shud not be too much of a problem shud it?
    or if it is, maybe this technique could be combined with those usually used by gamedevelopers?
    Firstly, you can only proceduraly generate textures via algorithms. This is fine for things like wood, marble and grain which follow natural algorithms (based around fractals etc.). However, can you tell me what mathematical algorithm describes a human face, or the texture used on a flak cannon? For these bitmaps will always be used.

    Second, even if i was possible, would you be happy to wait 5 minutes every time you load a level whilst the textures and sound are regenerated?

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