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The guy who replaced his Mobo but having problem.

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    The guy who replaced his Mobo but having problem.

    I read like a days ago about someone who couldn't get his new mobo to boot up windows? He didn't want to format and start over again.

    I would search that thread, IF I COULD! but can't.


    I subscribed to PCSTATS mailing list and got this answer that may prove helpful to this person.


    Q: The motherboard in my computer died recently. Since I have a little experience I decided to replace it myself with an ECS K7S5A that was compatible with my AMD Athlon processor and memory. Everything seems to work fine, except that Windows XP Pro will not load. The computer POSTs fine, and the XP loading window comes up, but then the computer resets itself... I'd thought heat was the problem, but the temperature readings in the BIOS are normal. I don't want to reinstall, are there any steps I can take to get my PC working again?
    A: The problem you are having is most likely with Windows XP itself, or rather the fact that you changed the motherboard and Windows XP is not finding what it's looking for on boot up. I'm assuming that the motherboard you used previously had a different chipset than the ECS board just installed. All versions of Windows (and most other operating systems too) have difficulty in adapting to major hardware changes, and changing the motherboard chipset, which allows the various other parts of the system to work together, is about the biggest change you can make.

    Fortunately, Windows XP makes this situation considerably easier and less time consuming to recover from than previous versions. What you need to do is a "repair install". To perform this fixl, boot your PC from the WinXP CD. Choose the "press enter to set up Windows XP now" option. Press "F8" to skip through the EULA and then press "R" to begin a repair installation.

    Your system will go through the entire XP install process, but will not attempt to replace any of your existing data. It will simply reinstall the vital system files, fixing any that are corrupted or missing. During this process, your new motherboard will be taken into account by the OS. Windows XP (with SP1) contains the necessary drivers for your new board, so you should not have trouble after the repair install finishes. You will however, need to re-activate your copy of XP so have your CD-key handy.

    How is this On Topic indirectly? Well, i want this person to play and boost the Player Stats!

    #2
    That same situation has happened to me before! Which made me reinstall XP Pro!

    Comment


      #3
      Heres the solution that usually solves this issue. Works for winxp/ xp pro/ and win2000.
      BEFORE CHANGING THE MOTHERBOARD, manually change the IDE controller driver to "standard dual IDE controller" then reboot. this loads a generic IDE driver that works, so far for me, with any motherboard. Then when you attach the hard drive to the new motherboard with a different IDE chipset it SHOULD boot up and begin detecting the rest of the devices.
      If you still have the old board, and assuming you havent trashed the xp install fubing with trying to boot and fix it, you should re-setup the old board with cpu, etc so you can boot back to the HDD and make those changes.
      I do this all the time at my store for people if they are doing upgrades- but you will have to do a repair reinstall if the old mobo is dead.
      good luck

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by peterbi
        Heres the solution that usually solves this issue. Works for winxp/ xp pro/ and win2000.
        BEFORE CHANGING THE MOTHERBOARD, manually change the IDE controller driver to "standard dual IDE controller" then reboot. this loads a generic IDE driver that works, so far for me, with any motherboard. Then when you attach the hard drive to the new motherboard with a different IDE chipset it SHOULD boot up and begin detecting the rest of the devices.
        If you still have the old board, and assuming you havent trashed the xp install fubing with trying to boot and fix it, you should re-setup the old board with cpu, etc so you can boot back to the HDD and make those changes.
        I do this all the time at my store for people if they are doing upgrades- but you will have to do a repair reinstall if the old mobo is dead.
        good luck
        Nice man I will keep than in mind next time!

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