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    Back to UDK to UE4 or...?

    Hi guys, I'm a 3D artist and it's quite a (long) while that I don't use the UDK\Unreal Engine but I need to come back on it and I was wondering if I should take the UDK back to learn and then "upgrade" to the Unreal Engine 4 or if it's a waste of time and I should directly jump on the UE4.
    I'm asking this also considering the amount of documentation, tutorials out there about the UDK and I don't really know how different the UE4 is, so how "transferable" that UDK knowledge is to the new engine.
    Can you please help me decide?

    #2
    This topic comes up almost daily. I would post the very same question to people actually using UE4 on the new unreal forums and then update this post for others to follow. Quite a lot of people have moved off these forums since the new release. So is that the answer, or does that mean they were 'ready' to make the jump?

    If you need tutorials, and can't learn without them i.e. they are your crutch. Then UDK, may be your best option. But if you're a self-starter and can build demos on your own and teach yourself, then either will work for you... In addition, there hasn't been a lot of hardware benchmarking on these forums between the two engines, but that's probably a significant issue... Also I've heard there are some sub-systems that have not been fully implemented yet in UE4. I'm not qualified to speak about them, but I've been told that Vehicles, Weapons and UI are still a work-in-progress...

    Many people are looking for a shortcut. But the truth is there's no disadvantage to knowing both, it just boils down to time, your time. There are some bugs in UE4 apparently, so if you have worked in UDK it will undoubtedly aid you in troubleshooting. i.e. If you know how to implement functionality in UDK, it will help you come up with a workaround in UE4 because you already have a working reference point, and therefore know what the expected results should be.

    Still everyone wants the quick answer. But the reality is you won't get through a career without learning multiple game engines and / or digital studio packages anyway. So the sooner you start learning something the better. The more you know, the more creative you can be in thinking-up solutions etc. Whatever you decide, endeavour to produce quality work that will hold up and stand on its own two feet irrelevant of the game engine. So start building up a quality portfolio of work now.

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      #3
      Thank you very much for your answer frankit!
      I'm not really looking for a shortcut but more for an advice since I feel quite lost about it. I tend to be really precise and picky, some say too much, that's why I'm asking for advice. If I had to do it my way, I would just go back to UDK and build my way up but I want to stay realistic and if possible, avoid the unnecessary "harshness" under the which I often fall.
      I totally agree with you about knowing more engines and when talking about UDK and UE4 the main difference is about the PBR shaders i guess. This is one of the biggest concerns I have about the 2 engines. For example, Is it harder to find a job without knowing PBR? And things like that.
      As you suggest, I'll post the question on the UE4 forum too and update this one

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        #4
        For those who are interested. Here is the unreal engine forum thread about this topic: https://forums.unrealengine.com/show...1031#post41031

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          #5
          Originally posted by fighter5347 View Post
          For those who are interested. Here is the unreal engine forum thread about this topic: https://forums.unrealengine.com/show...1031#post41031
          Hey fighter, "Nimrail" is actually me... XD I logged just now to post that topic here too.

          However, I've checked the "issue" with other artists\developers too and, who more who less, found useful knowing UDK before jumping on UE4 since there are still many common things between the 2 toolsets, meaning that the UDK knowledge is still relevant.
          Probably the best option for me is not to start from just one of the 2 but to just give a head start to UDK while keeping the UE4 on the background for a while, but for sure not ignore it "until I feel ready for the upgrade".
          Thanks again guys for your help

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