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Can UDK output rendered passes and object buffer for compositing?

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    Can UDK output rendered passes and object buffer for compositing?

    Hello everyone,
    I'd be interested to make a movie using UDK as rendering environment and I'm wondering if the software is capable of exporting image sequences for every channel (diffuse, light, etc) and single objects with their relative alpha mask, in order to composite them later in After Effects (or other compositing suite).


    It seems that the upcoming Cinebox for Cryengine will support such features:
    Cinebox Rendered Output
    Our new Render Output Dialog supports larger-than-screen rendering and arbitrary buffers, all exportable as 32bit multi-channel EXR. Other features include timecode, batch sequence rendering, and support for native system video codecs.

    How about UDK and Matinee? Is that possible or are there any workaround to do that?

    #2
    Cinebox is specifically for filmmaking whereas UDK is not, and they have put pretty minimal thinking into that area from what I've seen. There is a workaround of sorts, since UDK supports different rendering modes using console commands, you can force the level into a particular rendering mode via kismet (for example, color only, lighting only etc).. then save these as different versions of the level. create shortcuts with the same settings but different map names. output sequences for each by running the shortcut to spit out the frames, making sure it is set to not skip frames, and dump the results for each version into their own folders.

    I do this process for my series and it works fine for me, it gives me a lot more control than the rendering would normally give me. Relative alpha mask? No. But you should be able to figure out creative ways to mask and key stuff anyway...

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      #3
      I should note that there's another caveat, and a pretty important one if you're planning on doing a lot of this, especially in full HD... it takes a LOT of hard drive space... even just several seconds of full HD output for a single rendering mode will be around 1 GB, so the more layers you render out, it will easily pile up and fill up your drive... so unless you have a ton of storage, it's not so ideal...

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        #4
        Henrik is referring to the dump movie, and yes, it's pretty insane, but you can compile them into a video using after effects or ffmpeg with batch script if you're smart, then use handbreak to h.26 or something and make high bitrate value to compress video which is a godsend.

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