Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Question about Programmer's Rate

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Question about Programmer's Rate

    I am hoping this is the correct forum to ask this question, if not I apologize.

    I am looking for a bit of clarity and/or guidance when looking for a programmer that is experienced with the Unreal environment.
    What are some of the questions I should be asking when seeking a coder who can work in UDK and what can I expect to pay someone? I know what needs to be done in regards to a project but unclear on where to start the discussion when it comes to compensation. I do know that it would be under a contract set-up (1099 here in the U.S.)

    For instance, after some research I have found that coders can attract anywhere from 50K -over 100K per year depending on experience and skill level, but what justifies a "junior" position over a "senior" position? Is someone that is very experienced in C++ able to handle the duties of developing various game mechanics in the Unreal environment enough or do they need Unreal experience as well? On the other hand, can someone that has a vast knowledge of Unreal handle those duties, even if they are not as experienced in C++? Should I assume that coding is coding and they are all interchangeable?

    Any knowledge or opinions would be greatly appreciated.

    #2
    Originally posted by Raenz View Post
    questions I should be asking
    -How much experience do you have?
    -Have you participated in other projects? -> When yes, then you could contact one of the team and you can ask him how the person that wants your job was
    -Do you have something to show?

    Comment


      #3
      Knowledge of c++ is a good think, but not really needed for udk, if you don't have the full 750.000$ license. knowledge of unrealScript is somewhat needed, because they need to know all the premade functions in udk.

      Comment


        #4
        c++ is useless in udk, only unreal script
        the full ue3 (very expensive) will need c++ AND unreal script.

        i guess a "junior" would be someone with limited experience and limited responsibilities.
        a "senior" would be someone with vast experience and big responsibilities, lead programmer for example.

        coding is coding to a certain extent, all oop languages have common concepts, the syntax however is quite different and takes time to learn.
        someone with no unreal script under their belt comming from c++ will struggle to start with untill they know the syntax and the api.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Raenz View Post
          For instance, after some research I have found that coders can attract anywhere from 50K -over 100K per year depending on experience and skill level, but what justifies a "junior" position over a "senior" position? Is someone that is very experienced in C++ able to handle the duties of developing various game mechanics in the Unreal environment enough or do they need Unreal experience as well? On the other hand, can someone that has a vast knowledge of Unreal handle those duties, even if they are not as experienced in C++? Should I assume that coding is coding and they are all interchangeable?
          Programming skills should be language independent. Anyone can cite knowledge of c++ (or any language, but game development seems to attract the c++ 'badge of honour') and still lack the experience to use the language effectively. Programming is 10% syntax and 90% problem solving. You want someone who can provide a solution.

          With respect to UDK, or any other engine, you do want specific experience. The principles of game dev are shared across platforms, but each engine has its own API, methodology, quirks and limitations. Proven experience with the software itself should be the watermark, and even the most competent veteran would require time to adjust to new platforms.

          Whether they're expected to complete a series of small tasks, or architect and manage a complete project would generally define a junior/senior role and level of responsibility, but this is all project specific. And be aware that this is such an open and diverse field nowadays - from industry pros to enthusiasts and students - with so much free code and tutorials on the net it's easy to fall into a trap of hiring someone with all the will in the world, and little to back it up.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Spoof View Post
            Programming is 10% syntax and 90% problem solving. You want someone who can provide a solution.
            This.


            To say that c++ is useless in UDK depends on how you take it... If someone is very experienced in c++ they are going to understand Object Oriented programming which is incredibly important in UDK development. On the flip side, if you want to get going ASAP, UnrealScript knowledge is vital.

            I personally feel like it is a very subjective topic, but I would take an experienced c++ (or any other OO language) programmer over a new UnrealScript programmer.

            Comment


              #7
              Thanks for the great information.

              Comment

              Working...
              X