Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

i7 or i5 for gaming and work with UDK

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    i7 or i5 for gaming and work with UDK

    my pc right now is a phenom II X4 @3.8, 8gb ddr3, hd 6870. I have 400$ USD to spend in amazon to update my rig

    #2
    You can't afford an i7, so if that's your choices then you'd have to go with an i5

    Comment


      #3
      Either one is just fine. We have a mixture of i5 and i7 in the office here, and both are just as capable. For development, try shooting for more ram depending on what you're doing. For gaming and development, shoot for a slightly above average GPU.

      Comment


        #4
        http://www.amazon.com/Intel-Core-i7-...-4&keywords=i7

        http://www.amazon.com/MSI-Intel-Moth...ds=msi+z77+g43

        or this

        http://www.amazon.com/MSI-LGA1155-US...ds=msi+z77+g43


        these are good options?

        Comment


          #5
          I would buy a i5 processor, because they are cheaper and the i7 processors are just a little bit faster/better.

          Comment


            #6
            I use an i3 that is better than many i5's, even some older i7's. Don't rely on the series number to tell you whether a particular model is better or worse than another. Compare performance benchmarks at reputable test sites, many have very detailed charts of all current processor models and how they stack up against each other.

            Comment


              #7
              You could also go for an AMD FX 8350. Not as good as Intel when it comes to single threaded but it's better than most of the i5' and some of i7's in multithreading, and it is also cheaper.

              Comment


                #8
                i tested UDK in my mother netbook ( amd apu 1,1ghz ) ;O! this engine is the best

                Comment


                  #9
                  Although it is unlikely you can afford the i7 with your budget:

                  The i7 will typically outperform the i5 in any applications that support heavy threading, like games and media software.
                  This is because the higher i5 models are Quad-Core (4 total threads) while the i7's are Quad-Core Hyper-Thread (8 total threads).
                  And the i7's have larger L3 Cache (Sandy Bridge: i7 8MB vs i5 6MB. Ivy Bridge: i7 8MB-15MB vs i5 6MB. Haswell: 8MB most i7s, 6MB on some i7's, 6MB on all i5's).

                  The Hyper-Thread is not a true additional core, so only certain performance improvements can be noted.
                  The HT performance gains will vary a lot depending on the code executing, but can see up to 30% improvement.
                  The HT is not typically a big noticeable improvement for general UnrealEd use, since that is not really processor intensive, but it is noticeable during building, especially lighting building (Lightmass Swarm Agent). 20% on an hour-long build is 12 minutes.

                  I have a wide variety of hardware here, some AMD and mostly Intel, and mostly i7 series.
                  And I have found that an equally beneficial improvement can be had by purchasing a high-end motherboard, such as an ASUS Sabertooth or Maximus.
                  All of my systems with plain Intel or Gigabyte motherboards perform poorly in comparison regardless of which i3 or i5 or i7 is in the socket.

                  That said, for $400 you can get an i5-3470 IvyBridge 3.2GHz Quad LGA1155 for $199.99 and an ASUS P8Z77-V PRO LGA1155 ATX mobo for $174.99 MIB, at NCIX.com USA.
                  You didn't mention any supported form-factor for your case. Or whether tax is included in the budget price.

                  i7-2600K i5-2500K i3-2100 comparison:
                  AnandTech Sandy Bridge i7 i5 i3 review

                  i7-3770 review:
                  AnandTech Ivy Bridge i7 review

                  i7-4770K i5-4670K comparison:
                  AnandTech Haswell i7 i5 review

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Henrik View Post
                    I use an i3 that is better than many i5's, even some older i7's. Don't rely on the series number to tell you whether a particular model is better or worse than another. Compare performance benchmarks at reputable test sites, many have very detailed charts of all current processor models and how they stack up against each other.
                    Would you care to elaborate? I'm not doubting you, I'm just curious.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Well there's like 3 generations of i3 processors, so you can end up with a new one that's better than an old i5.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        That's technically true, but you'd have to be pretty uninformed to buy an i5 that's worse than any i3 right now.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          There is in fact a significant difference between the i3 and i5 desktop processors for overall performance especially in heavy threaded applications.

                          The i3 desktop series are all Dual-Core HyperThread.
                          The i5 desktop series are all Quad-Core and typically have twice as much Cache MB as the i3 *.
                          * Note that there are a few exceptions in specs for certain CPU models.

                          For UDK use I would personally always choose an i5 over an i3 due to the number of actual cores.
                          The i3 does typically cost 25% to 35% less than the i5 though.

                          Hyperthreading typically only gives a net benefit of around 5% to 15% of a real core, depending on the code that is executing in each thread.
                          So on anything that is heavily multi-threaded, such as building lighting in UDK, the i5 will outperform the i3 by a theoretical 2x due to twice the number of cores and twice the cache size.
                          The i3's Hyperthreading will make very little overall difference in heavy threaded applications as it will only perform essentially as 2 cores with another 5%-15% on each core for the HT.
                          So consider the i3 a "2.3 Core" processor.

                          That being said, on lighter application use where no more than 2 heavy concurrent threads are executing, a 3rd generation i3 would put a good run on a 1st generation i5, since Ivy Bridge is a better platform than 1st gen Core.

                          Here is a link to PassMark's CPU Bench for synthetic benchmark comparisons.

                          i5-3550 = 6868
                          i3-3220 = 4235
                          i5-750 = 3740
                          i3-530 = 2590

                          i3 Series basic specs:
                          i3-500 1st gen 4MB
                          i3-2000 2nd gen 3MB
                          i3-3000 3rd gen 3MB
                          i3-4000 4th gen 3MB

                          i5 series basic specs:
                          i5-6/700 1st gen 4/8MB (i5-600 are Dual-Core HT, i5-700 are Quad-Core)
                          i5-2000 2nd gen 6MB
                          i5-3000 3rd gen 6MB
                          i5-4000 4th gen 6MB

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I pass from a i3 to a i5 OC (look my post for i5 2500k) and i has a 20% more performance
                            the biggest jump was passing from a 1TB HDD to a sata2 or 3 128GB SSD!
                            my pc is x3 faster

                            first move to ssd then change cpu

                            My gpu is 7850 oc to 1200Mz

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Usually for a high end pc you use the ssd additionally.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X