Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

UDK & Startup Game Studio

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • replied
    Snake's advice is very valid. Since you are all friends and working locally, I would add one other piece of potential advice - and that would be to not initially quite the day-job; work in your spare time. You may find that developing a proper game is a more intensive process than you initially thought, or that it is not for all of you. Working on prototypes, like terminatus suggests is a good way forwards.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    As advices, I would say:
    1 - Try to make a short game on your spare time just to be sure you understand the workflow around game creation and what a "real" will cost in term of time & money
    2 - As it was mentionned, look at what your want to build and if it may interest people.
    3 - As it was mentionned, how cash will come during the development phase (it could be long ). Here I have no advice, but path could be loan, "business angel" funding, self funding, Kickstarter (or others)..;
    4 - UDK may be a good choice for a first title. You have full source access engine like T3D from garagegames that went opensource 6 months ago. It all depands of the game you are doing and what's your long term strategy. As it was said, if you win enough money to share 25% royalties, you may be in a position to look for Full Licence for the future
    5 - Be the first studio is nice, but it must be a success if you want people to remind it !

    good luck

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Thanks for all the reply.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    ok SS, suit yourself... i'm a lover not a hater :]...

    nucleA... a truck driver once gave me some good advice... 'don't make it any harder than it has to be'... UDK is a good place to get your feet wet...

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Hello nucleA!

    So, you say you and your team are currently employed? That is a luxury many aspiring game developers don't have. I suggest you work on creating one or more game prototypes (in UDK, please don't try to make your own engine), and if you are able to make something fun and if you (and others!) see true potential in your prototypes, only THEN should you even consider taking the plunge into full-time game development.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    northstar
    Comparing the size of the engine is barely relevant or useful. How is an engine better because it is 20mb vs 1mb? Therefore the best engine is the demo ones which weight in at 64kb. Regardless of whatever these guys want to do, I believe there is bigger questions to answer. Before anyone decides to build a product, they really should be thinking about the business that surrounds the product to ensure the product actually succeeds. Building an engine is not a small task and you have to find the right reasons to do it ("because we can" is not a good enough reason); however, without a good understanding of the business aspects, it is impossible to figure out the correct reasons.

    We are already working on the story line/assets creation. Basically, we want to build the first game studio here in Mauritius and the game is based on the country's actual history. For example, the Dodo bird would be present in the game or part of the game.
    While these are good intention goals, remember that developing games is also a business. Therefore, like all businesses you have to make sure the market, to some degree, wants what you are actually making. Sure you can make a game that you really want to make, but if the market doesn't want it then you'll run out of resources to move forward to the next one.

    b) We are currently working in different IT companies and we are saving up for the studio. Even if we don't make profits for the first game, its no problem.
    Unfortunately, that isn't resolving cash flow for the game studio. That's resolving cash flow for yourselves personally. What you are doing right now ensures that you can start up the company without having to use bank loans and so forth. However, what that doesn't solve is how you will continue to make money while you are developing the game and to make sure that the game studio is acquiring enough resources (money, time, labor, etc) in order to actually be productive.

    So I'm going to go back to a) and b) as I don't think you've answered those adequately enough yet.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    nucleA was thinking of building an engine, solid snake... but time and money were a problem... seems relavent to me... UDK is not the center of the universe... but whatever (shrug)...

    glad to see you have a plan nucleA... thats a good place to start :]... stev

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by Solid Snake View Post
    a) Do you know enough about what it is you are trying to do?
    b) How do you resolve cash flow.
    a) We are already working on the story line/assets creation. Basically, we want to build the first game studio here in Mauritius and the game is based on the country's actual history. For example, the Dodo bird would be present in the game or part of the game.
    b) We are currently working in different IT companies and we are saving up for the studio. Even if we don't make profits for the first game, its no problem.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    That's not even advice northstar, which is remotely useful or relevant to this discussion.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    the irrlicht engine is basic, built on the quake 3 model (which makes it real simple for level creation)... but it is reeeaaal rough around the edges... the good point is it is free to use however you want and the basic building blocks are done... its a programmers engine...

    irrlicht engine a couple mb
    saurbraten cube 2 engine 20mb
    UDK engine... 1 gb

    if you should decide to go that way... just sayin...

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    You guys actually need to solve two things before even deciding what technology you want to use.

    a) Do you know enough about what it is you are trying to do?
    b) How do you resolve cash flow.

    If you can resolve a) and b) then this thread is worth continuing. If not, then I suggest you guys go back and resolve them first.

    For reference, I do own an indepedent game studio which has released several titles in the market place (The Ball, The Haunted, Epoch, Forge to name a few). These are basic questions I always ask anybody who wants to know how to get started in the games industry.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Well, the difference is the royalty fee, software programs like 3ds Max have a 1-time cost so that's not that big of a deal. If you're looking into using UDK then you'll have to pay royalty after $50,000 but if you get that high then you could possibly look into paying for a non-royalty license or you might have enough money to fund your own engine development.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    I think that you should start with some available engine like UDK. You can use AAA technology developed by many professionals "for free". Make some good game, earn some money and then you can think about your own engine. Many people give up because their goals are too high for them. Start with something smaller.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    I can actually go towards developing a custom engine since i already did some of the courses @ Game Institute but the major problem remains time as darkxether mentioned. On the other hand, using UDK on the long run would not be the optimal solution.

    Another point we should consider for startup are the license fees. If we add license fees for UDK, 3DS Max & for consoles, the price can go high.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    DON'T make your own engine you will spend more time on the engine than the game. This is exactly what engines are for so you don't reinvent the wheel.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X