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    Brand Spankin New!

    Hi everybody!
    Names Winter and I'm just getting into 3D modeling and UDK. I've been drilling through the 3D buzz tutorial videos so I've got a VERY basic understanding of what I'm getting myself into. I'm also getting my learn on with 3DS Max, Vue, Quidam, SpeedTree and ZBrush. My question is which of these highly learning curve intensive programs should I start with first(in conjunction with UDK)? I was thinking Quidam for modeling characters, VUE for backdrop images(import the heightmaps to UDK and throw some speedtrees on em if needed) and 3DS Max for everything else(clothes, weapons, levels, animations, etc) but ZBrush looks pretty impressive(not a clue as to how to work it though). Lets just pretend I have ZERO knowledge in anything. From that perspective which of these programs will be most useful with development in UDK?

    To figure out what would be best let me just say what I really want to do. I want a side scroll fighting game with a play style similar to Super Smash Bros(Multiplayer Only). Camera work and collision detection are big with this from what I've read but not too many people if any have really successfully done it as far as I can tell. Probably not the wisest of ideas to start off with but its what made me want to use UDK so I gotta go with it.

    Any and all input is welcome and appreciated

    #2
    From a modeling perspective probably Maya (but it highly depends on your preferences and resources) other programs like Max and blender among others are also good! It depends on what feels best for you to pick up the necessary knowledge for the field. after you acquire a comfortable skill level working in your first application you should try others to round off the knowledge you've started also keep the first application as readily used as possible so you don't get rusty with it. If you're looking for a position in an art/computer field like modeler or animator your employer may have a specific software they use so learn to adapt not specialize this can be quite opposite if you're just enthusiastically learning for your own benefit (and sinking your own money into the endeavor). Also if you're able DO NOT try to learn more then one application at a time as it is usually counter productive as learning each of the applications will be quite daunting and confusing just from the number of hot keys and functions/terms that don't match up from one program to the next.
    Some observations on managing projects and the UDK. The more supplemental software you throw in to the production process the more convoluted and disorientating game development may become. K.I.S.S. is a great rule of thumb. UDK which is pretty robust on its own, combined with a strong direction and some basic applications can yield incredible results. Take time to plot out the elements that go into your project and what accomplishes them efficiently. Definitely keep the limitations of UDK in mind. as a good part of it is currently wrapped up in the need to understand a bevy of parts like anim trees textures materials sockets/nodes bones unreal script kismit and the orders that need to be followed to make all them (and some other stuff ie inventory camera weapon systems) work.

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      #3
      If you're going to be modeling, I assume that you're going to be texturing as well. If you're going to start off with modeling software (Max, Maya, or other), then I think learning Photoshop can go hand in hand. If you are going to tackle more than one piece of software at once, then you might as well make them programs that compliment each other. There are a lot of great tools in Photoshop by itself for texturing, but there are also a lot of cool plugins as well. Anyways, good luck!

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        #4
        3ds max & Maya are going to give you the most well rounded support for UDK, as you can create several types of assets using them alone, which is not true of the others you have listed.

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          #5
          Thanks for the feedback guys!
          I'll focus on learning the UDK engine, photoshop, and 3DS Max for now. I have to say these are some freakishly massive programs though, and this will take an unimaginably long time to get the hang of lol. I'm thinking 3 months of solid(1-2hrs a day) tutorials and learning should prep me to make a simplistic version of what my actual goal is, and then I can go from that point.

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            #6
            I would also suggest making small projects for yourself along with the tutorials. It will force you to figure out problems that may not have come up in tutorials. When I was learning, having a project proved to be the best way to learn.

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              #7
              I just got done watching all of the 3DBuzz tutorials(minus the cinematics since I have no interest in that)...Gotta say, they were REALLY informative. My brain feels like its gonna melt and I'm pretty sure I need to do a lot more research into all this but I'm pretty confident I can make a decent little board to play around in now.

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