Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

UDK with SpeedTree: What do I get?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    UDK with SpeedTree: What do I get?

    I see UDK advertising that it comes with SpeedTree... stuff. Honestly I really don't know and I'm not seeing answers tailored for someone with my understanding.
    When I look at the actual SpeedTree site I see their software available to be purchased by studios. What I see from UDK makes it sound as if it has the same program built into UDK. I must be reading something wrong here. I could understand if UDK has some special interface built that makes importing trees built with SpeedTree easier, but yet that doesn't quite make sense; I would image the program would generate a static mesh, so no further interaction is needed. the tree would just be yet another static mesh.

    So what exactly is this correlation between SpeedTree and UDK? And moreover, how does it affect me, a person who does not own a copy of the SpeedTree Software?

    #2
    You dont need to own a copy of the speedtree, it already comes with UDK if you check your UDK folder in the start menu. And as much as i know, the correlation between UDK and SpeedTree is that you cant export the trees you make with SpeedTree to another software, only to UDK. It also gives warning that it wont work with UDK if you have some messed up material setup in your tree or something.

    Comment


      #3
      I don't have a full answer but I can at least give a partial one. UDK comes with the SpeedTree modeler for use with UDK as well as code (integrated into the engine itself) for rendering SpeedTrees. This is important because SpeedTrees are not, in fact, just static meshes; they have lots of specialized rendering optimizations built in that make them more efficient than rendering general shapes. There's a (probably outdated) article about some of these features available here.

      That said, UDK does not come with a full SpeedTree license. I'm not sure exactly what differences there are but, as mentioned, you can't use things you've made with the modeler outside of Unreal.

      Hope that helps and that someone can fill in some more details.

      Comment


        #4
        I think it comes with a limited number of tree types that you can make.

        Comment


          #5
          Nabiul thats not 100% correct.

          You can make literally any kind of tree you can imagine. You can hand draw trees any shape you like. It's not limited to trees either. Various games have been known to use it for bushes and even grass too.

          The only limitations are that you cant export to another program other than UDK, so no export to mesh or anything like that. And iirc you cant use certain branch types and as Jacky said, the materials. Use basic textures in speedtree, then setup more fancy ones in UDK itself.

          Comment


            #6
            I love the SpeedTree implementation into UDK it makes creating the vegetation soo much easier. Unfortunately I am still pretty confused about the performance optimization, LOD etc... I wish there where tutorials available about that. However SpeedTrees in general seem to be very efficient. Just search for tree in the content browser and you should find some example for SpeedTree files and yes they are completely different from normal meshes.

            I find the idea of using SpeedTree for all vegetation including grass quite intriguing. Any idea how that would be done and if the performance would be better than the normal polygon planes?

            Comment


              #7
              One barrier to using SpeedTree for small vegetation is that, as far as I know, there's no good way to make it work with the foliage engine in Unreal (which supports static meshes).

              Comment


                #8
                Yeah that's the problem, you can't quickly scatter speed trees around with the foliage tools.

                Comment

                Working...
                X