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Blender vs 3dstudio max

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  • replied
    That seems like an okay choice for starters. Where I work doesn't have an .edu address (rather it's an .org/government-run non-profit), but where I work does oversee schools and activity centers, and I was able to qualify for the Education account, and wind up with Max *and* Maya non-commercial versions. It seems that Autodesk isn't as strict about who qualifies as they once were, but I do respect your decision. I've started out using Blender, and it is good, but I just lost my flair in it.

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  • replied
    Thanks everyone for the advice and I think I have made my choice, but I don't start school till october of next year I am going to full sail university in Florida. So I am going to have to wait to get it with my edu email.

    In the mean time I will have to deal with blender for now.

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  • replied
    Originally posted by darthviper107 View Post
    Max is $3,500 and there are no taxes.

    Although if you're outside of the U.S. it's much more expensive
    Right, like I said, 3ds Max is the same price as Maya... It's all about the flip of the coin for that price to know which tool to lean towards.

    Although what WOULD hurt you in the long run, are those dreaded subscription fees, and those could be a few hundred bucks. I think Maya's sub. fees are higher than Max's are, iirc.

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  • replied
    Originally posted by ironbelly View Post
    Last I checked the commercial license for max was $4500, over $5000 if yuo include taxes. Blender is free, that should just about answer your question unless you have 5k burning a hole in your pocket, if you do then clearly Max would be the choice. That being said I've always found something intriguing about Blender. The way they do away with the standard UI layout for something radically different. I have a sneaking suspicion that it's insanely more efficient if yuo can learn how to really use it but so few get past that point Plus if you do amazing work in blender there's some instant street cred that goes along with that. Pretty sure it's like being Tyler Durden in Fight Club, except in the 3D modeling world(much less badass but still)
    Max is $3,500 and there are no taxes.

    Although if you're outside of the U.S. it's much more expensive

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  • replied
    Last I checked the commercial license for max was $4500, over $5000 if yuo include taxes. Blender is free, that should just about answer your question unless you have 5k burning a hole in your pocket, if you do then clearly Max would be the choice. That being said I've always found something intriguing about Blender. The way they do away with the standard UI layout for something radically different. I have a sneaking suspicion that it's insanely more efficient if yuo can learn how to really use it but so few get past that point Plus if you do amazing work in blender there's some instant street cred that goes along with that. Pretty sure it's like being Tyler Durden in Fight Club, except in the 3D modeling world(much less badass but still)

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  • replied
    Yeah, you're probably right...

    Now I wasn't knocking Maya or 3ds Max, or even Blender, but to me, it just seems like Maya shouldn't be ruled out as another choice of modeling tool, either. After all, it's right around the same price as 3ds Max, and, imo, does seem to be an overall easier modeling tool on top of that (at least it feels more like a natural tool to me than Max does). However, it does seem like Blender is a tool that combines the two, you have the same modeling style as Maya (heck, you have a Maya preset in Blender, and can set up Blender to work that way almost out of the box). Then at the same time, you have an interface in the buttons and such that resemble 3ds Max controls... So for each their own in that market. However, considering that I've got an educational account with Autodesk, I can certainly tell a lot of the differences and similarities thus far. So no harm, no foul.

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  • replied
    I wouldn't go back and touch Blender with the longest barge pole.

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  • replied
    The main problem with Blender, as well as other modeling apps compared to max is the way polygon modeling works.
    Max is far superior to any other app. Each tool has it's function, and works they I cloud expect to work.
    I.e Extrude in Maya can also inset and Bevel.
    Also every tool is easily accessible from ribbon bar, each tool have easy access to options (shift+click).

    No to mention Modifier Stack. That's the thing I miss in every app. It can work much like image layers in image editing apps. I add One edit Poly, stack on it another Edit Poly, and I can very easy reverse back if I messed up something.
    Imagine how you cloud do something like that in other apps ?

    I tryed Maya. But Polygon modeling and Uwrapping those polygon in max is just far easier and faster..

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  • replied
    Originally posted by WedgeBob View Post
    Well, a lot of it has to do with which modeling tool corresponds to what the up/top perspective of the game engine points to as well. For example, UDK is in the Z-Up perspective, so logically, it's best to have a modeling tool that follows suit. Therefore, 3ds Max, Blender, and Carrara all have the Z-Up perspective, much like UnrealEd does. So there, that's your answer. Maya, on the other hand, is in a Y-Up perspective, so things could get interesting having something exported to UDK from that.
    You can set Maya to use Z-up axis if you want. And besides that, every exporter has a setting to switch the orientation anyways. That's no basis to choose a program.

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  • replied
    True. Not to mention that I jumped on the early adopter special for Platinum Club members to get their hands on D|S 4 Pro for a good discount (at least there you get FBX export support, which was the kicker for me), but I have to wonder if the FBX support from DAZ, whether Carrara or DS4 Pro would even be compatible with what Epic was looking for. Seems like the UDN documentation was very specific on what types of FBX exports UnrealEd will accept/support.

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  • replied
    Originally posted by WedgeBob View Post
    Exactly, another reason why I went with DAZ over Autodesk. DAZ is for the indie 3D crowd, and their tools are easy to work with. Between Carrara, Bryce, and Hexagon, think those work out really nice.
    However, as much as I do like Autodesk reaching out to the less fortunate with their Educational Versions of their tools, which I did take advantage of, I certainly think I know where my loyalty REALLY lies.
    D|S is great for animation too -- luckily I jumped on the chance to get 4 for free while they were running the promotion.

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  • replied
    That is complete nonsense. It takes less than 5 seconds to convert Maya to be z-up once and for all.

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  • replied
    Well, a lot of it has to do with which modeling tool corresponds to what the up/top perspective of the game engine points to as well. For example, UDK is in the Z-Up perspective, so logically, it's best to have a modeling tool that follows suit. Therefore, 3ds Max, Blender, and Carrara all have the Z-Up perspective, much like UnrealEd does. So there, that's your answer. Maya, on the other hand, is in a Y-Up perspective, so things could get interesting having something exported to UDK from that.

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  • replied
    That may be true (besides, I never said it wasn't possible), but none of the companies I've worked for have ever done this

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  • replied
    Originally posted by Mougli View Post
    Companies who use Max for modelling use Max for animation and conversely for Maya. No company will bother buying both licenses. The exception might be MotionBuilder though.

    To answer the OP, it depends whether he wants to learn to land a job in the industry or make a commercial game with UDK.
    Sure they can, having the animators work in Maya isn't a problem at all, for video game development you can easily transfer between the two, and it is true that Maya has a better animation toolset than 3ds Max. It might be costly if you bought two license for one artist, but it's not any different to have the modelers on 3ds Max and the animators on Maya than to have them all on one program.

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