Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Unreal Certification

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Unreal Certification

    Hello,

    I haven't seen any thread talking about that, so I'm creating a little poll.

    As the Unreal Engine has become more popular than ever since the release of UDK (thanks again for this, Epic), I was wondering if you think it would be interesting to have Unreal Technology Certification exams for UnrealScript, Kismet, Level Building, Content creation, etc.

    Pretty much like the ones Microsoft, Sun and Autodesk offer.

    I think this would allow people with little to no games industry experience to have a solid proof of skill when submitting applications (because well, it's nice to have a level to show, but that doesn't mean you're doing it "correctly" or efficently, if you catch my drift).

    Don't get me wrong, this is in no way a replacement for actual experience (I should know ), but I do think it might help some talents to break through.

    #2
    How are you supposed to get one of these?

    Seriously, this industry honours creativity and skill more than certificates and university, so I doubt you could achieve much with that. A studio will probably always prefer someone who actually created something great to someone who has a certificate.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Crusha K. Rool View Post
      How are you supposed to get one of these?
      To the best of my knowledge you can't. There isn't anything liket it. Hence me asking if it would be relevant to have such a thing.

      Originally posted by Crusha K. Rool View Post
      Seriously, this industry honours creativity and skill more than certificates and university, so I doubt you could achieve much with that. A studio will probably always prefer someone who actually created something great to someone who has a certificate.
      Don't get me wrong, I'm only talking about the technical side of things here, so creativity is somewhat irrelevant here. Of course you can't really assess creativity from an exam.

      Being in the industry myself, I know how much more we care about experience
      and completed work, but that's merely because we don't have anything else we can really rely on at the moment. For non-programmer roles, that is.

      I don't know how much value holds a certificate in the "traditional" software development industry, but from my point of view, if I was a recruiter and I saw a CV with "UnrealEd certification", I would think "oh okay, I don't need to spend any time (money) training that guy".

      I'm mostly thinking about graduates, actually, because in a school graduation project, it's not always easy for the recruiter to really single out how the guy has really contributed.

      Then again, I'm not saying we need that.

      Comment


        #4
        I think it's easier to see if someone knows what they're doing by taking a look at what they've done, rather than the hoops they've jumped through to get a piece of paper.

        Comment


          #5
          I think this a really good idea. It'll make learning UDK much easier than just figuring out everything. Certificates only prove that you can deal with the software, that's all. This serves beginners the most... Experts don't need this at all.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by ambershee View Post
            I think it's easier to see if someone knows what they're doing by taking a look at what they've done, rather than the hoops they've jumped through to get a piece of paper.
            The problem is that people lie, forge

            Or in my case much like other net based people, your content washes away. It's hard for people to capture the times behind your work, if your work is still even around for them to view. A piece of paper is a irrefutable and timeless (to the time) and is not subject to ageing much like personal work. Also to showcase that you know "everything" is quite beefy task.

            I don't know, I would prefer to have a accreditation that I would need to renew every 4 years. However for 4 years I get to have the title as "UE3 Master Pwner"

            Comment


              #7
              I have no complaints about this, so long as it doesn't cost huge amounts to obtain, like some other licenses.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Sir. Polaris View Post
                The problem is that people lie, forge
                If you apply as a Level Designer, employees will ask for your levels to play.
                If you apply as a Programmer, employees will ask snippets of code, will look at blogs or tutorials you have as proof of your skills.

                So i really have no idea what this should add other than a "look at my e-peen" kinda thing.

                I'm also inclined to not agree with your "time makes everything bad" argument as you hopefully also have more recent work on your portfolio. If all your art is from 2000 not even a piece of paper will save you if you don't have art that is made with current gen graphics in mind.

                Also, if recruiters cannot make out what some person did in a project, the problem lies with the person himself for not clearly stating what he did. I see it on loads of portfolio's, "i worked on this" *insert project website*. That's just wrong and either the person is trying to hide his incompetence (something i've seen quite a lot), or he just doesn't know any better in which case he should ask people at polycount, cgsociety, etc... for feedback.

                Comment

                Working...
                X