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    Mastering Unreal Technology Books?

    I was thinking about buying all the volumes to the Mastering Unreal Technology Books. My question is lies within whether or not it would be wise to do so seeing as it says Unreal Engine 3 and not UDK. I'm pretty new to the game programming and I want to learn as much as I can about the Unreal Engine and I figured UDK was my best bet but I also like to have books so I can go back and refresh anything at anytime. Video tutorials are good too but some people prefer the books you know?
    So can anybody tell me the difference between UDK and Unreal Engine 3 because on the site the only thing it said is that it is "uncompromised FREE version of Unreal Engine 3."

    #2
    The biggest difference between a full UE3-license and UDK is the fact that UDK doesn't allow access to the sourcecode of the engine.

    Comment


      #3
      So everything else is exactly the same?

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        #4
        Which means you need to mod and hack your way around, not code with C++ and just make it so. However seeing how you pay nothing, and you not all that limited - It's not that big of a deal.

        I think "uncompromised FREE version of Unreal Engine 3" is in reference to UDK.

        I been waiting on Mastering Unreal Technology, Volume III: Introduction to UnrealScript with Unreal Engine 3 since February last year. It's now rolled to next month at Dec 10 2010 - Dec 13 2010. I doubt I'm seeing it before next year.

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          #5
          Hold on, you guys aren't making any sense and just confusing the hell out of me haha. I am ASKING if these books are useful towards UDK lol.

          Comment


            #6
            ehhh...

            We got the first two books of the series for a game development course I'm in a few weeks ago. Realize that these are not meant for the UDK or the full unlicensed version of the engine. These books are aimed at mod developers using the editor that comes with the Unreal games. In fact each book comes with a license that will allow you to download a free copy of Unreal Black Edition through Steam; I did not install that copy as I did not want to install Steam.

            The menus are different in numerous places but with a little looking around, looking at the online docs, and as a last resort Googleing, you can find what you need. Portions of the first two books are still valid for the most current version of the UDK and the third book to be released I think in December should be mostly applicable as it deals with the scripting aspect exclusively. The problem with the first two books is they approach building games from a subtractive level creation standpoint even though the first book quite clearly states that subtractive levels are bad, outdated and should be avoided. (memory, resources, etc) The most current release of UDK doesn't even have the option to create subtractive levels. You might be able to get past this but if you're learning from scratch it might make it more difficult when you need to keep going between your book and various forms of online help. Some of the Physics parts are also invalid now as they seem to be in flux in the UDK at the moment. Things like PhysX destructables have been stripped from it while it's replacement hasn't been implemented yet because it's still in beta development at Nvidia and not released to the public yet. Most of the chapters dealing with materials, lighting, static and skeletal meshes are still worth a look; although you may need to refer to the online documentation or bump around the interface on your own to find a few menus items that are different.

            Knowing the problems between what the book was meant for and the most current UDK I would still buy the books and I will still buy the scripting book when it comes out. Just be aware going in that you will need to poke around a bit to find some things or adjust to more current methods than what the books use. (i.e. using additive levels vs. subtractive levels) In the end there really is nothing else that compares with the books on the market and it would be pretty impossible to keep updated books on the shelves considering how often a new UDK comes out and the glacial pace of the publishing cycle.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Lord Padriac View Post
              We got the first two books of the series for a game development course I'm in a few weeks ago. Realize that these are not meant for the UDK or the full unlicensed version of the engine. These books are aimed at mod developers using the editor that comes with the Unreal games. In fact each book comes with a license that will allow you to download a free copy of Unreal Black Edition through Steam; I did not install that copy as I did not want to install Steam.

              The menus are different in numerous places but with a little looking around, looking at the online docs, and as a last resort Googleing, you can find what you need. Portions of the first two books are still valid for the most current version of the UDK and the third book to be released I think in December should be mostly applicable as it deals with the scripting aspect exclusively. The problem with the first two books is they approach building games from a subtractive level creation standpoint even though the first book quite clearly states that subtractive levels are bad, outdated and should be avoided. (memory, resources, etc) The most current release of UDK doesn't even have the option to create subtractive levels. You might be able to get past this but if you're learning from scratch it might make it more difficult when you need to keep going between your book and various forms of online help. Some of the Physics parts are also invalid now as they seem to be in flux in the UDK at the moment. Things like PhysX destructables have been stripped from it while it's replacement hasn't been implemented yet because it's still in beta development at Nvidia and not released to the public yet. Most of the chapters dealing with materials, lighting, static and skeletal meshes are still worth a look; although you may need to refer to the online documentation or bump around the interface on your own to find a few menus items that are different.

              Knowing the problems between what the book was meant for and the most current UDK I would still buy the books and I will still buy the scripting book when it comes out. Just be aware going in that you will need to poke around a bit to find some things or adjust to more current methods than what the books use. (i.e. using additive levels vs. subtractive levels) In the end there really is nothing else that compares with the books on the market and it would be pretty impossible to keep updated books on the shelves considering how often a new UDK comes out and the glacial pace of the publishing cycle.
              Thanks a bunch you pretty much pinpointed every detail I needed to know. I appreciate the effort and information you provided.

              Comment


                #8
                big difference, unreal editor that comes with normal game is mainly for mods while udk is constantly updated, allows full compile games, etc...

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                  #9
                  On the front page of http://udk.com there is:

                  UDK is Unreal Engine 3. . .
                  UnrealScript for UE3 is UnrealScript for UDK. I doubt Epic would allow documentation of a closed-source game engine to be sold to the general public. If this was the case, however, I'd like a copy

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Sir. Polaris View Post
                    I been waiting on Mastering Unreal Technology, Volume III: Introduction to UnrealScript with Unreal Engine 3 since February last year. It's now rolled to next month at Dec 10 2010 - Dec 13 2010. I doubt I'm seeing it before next year.
                    Have you been living under a rock - it was cancelled by the publisher a while back

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                      #11
                      I highly recommend you buying the DVDs concerning UDK from Eat3D. I bought the entire bundle and never regreted.

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                        #12
                        I'm less convinced with those DVDs. They are very expensive for the very little they show you.

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                          #13
                          The collection is a great comprehensive introduction to the technology which allowed me to easily build upon my knowledge and continue with the help of UDN and the community. I think back in Unreal Engine 1, it was alot easier to step in and learn the different stuff. Now with all the features piling up rapidly, I feel it's more difficult for new comers with limited time like me to keep up. Those DVDs helped me to make the first steps quickly. I feel they are beneficial for those who do not have the time to learn the tools in the engine "as long as it takes".

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by ambershee View Post
                            I'm less convinced with those DVDs. They are very expensive for the very little they show you.
                            I'm seriously considering buying the Emitters volume for a friend of mine.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              $60 a DVD is pretty expensive. The whole set is over $400. Things like the 'lighting' DVD can be summarised on a single side of A4.

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