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How do major studio's use Unreal?

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    How do major studio's use Unreal?

    are major studios, like EA who license the Unreal engine, using the UDK? I thought the Unreal Engine is the most licensed engine. What are they licencing? The code? Are they transitioning to UDK? Or they just use the core code and not UDK? That doesn't seem to make sense. Just wondering why The Ball is the first commercially available game made with UDK. Are big studios finishing up with Unreal 3? then next game UDK?

    #2
    When you license Unreal Engine 3 you get access to the entire thing, native source code and all. UDK only gives you access to the tools and the UnrealScript source. With UDK, you cannot modify the native source, which means you are limited to what you can do under the hood, so to speak. With a full license, you can modify anything and everything.

    Basically, major studios would never bother with UDK. They would buy a license of the engine and get the full engine source and then use that. For people that is not an option for, they can use UDK and make a game, but without the low level access to the engine.

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      #3
      So do artist at those big studios use custom UI to the engine or is it a bastardization of UDK?
      They get the Unreal Engine then have to write their own code for artist to interface with it? or they can start to take UDK apart?

      Like when they hire new artist, no one knows their engine and they have to teach every single artist who walks in the door, or they go with a UDK and people hit the ground running so to speak.

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        #4
        It's the same editor, but if they have some type of system or software they want to integrate with the game, they need the source code.

        Like for instance--Bioware used Unreal 3 with Mass Effect, but they built in their conversation system into the game engine, which they couldn't have done without the source code.

        They also need a full license so they can develop for consoles. A major studio probably wouldn't use UDK since it's only for PC games

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          #5
          Large companies use the UDK to demo the engine pretty much. Before there was such a thing as the UDK, companies that were interested in the Unreal Engine had to get in touch with Epic, set up a trial contract with them, get on a secure connection, and so on. All of that took time and effort. With the UDK companies can take the first step towards Unreal with very little trouble, and find out within days whether or not it is something they'd like to look deeper into. That is good.

          That said, source code access aside, there is really not that much difference between the UDK and the normal Unreal Engine 3. If you would have access to the UDK source code, you would pretty much simply have Unreal Engine 3, and you would be able to do anything and everything you want as well. And that is exactly the point, the UDK has brought the exact same tools that large development studios use to the general public, just minus the source code. Someone who is good in the UDK can be hired by a large company and be up and running in their Unreal Engine 3 game in no time.

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            #6
            I used to use Unreal 3 professionally. Basically you can add new features to Unreal 3 proper, but not UDK.

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              #7
              thanks for the explanations and insight. I feel really noob about this question since I bet its obvious to people who've worked in games for any amount of time.
              This is a big difference between film and games. In film if you don't know the software that company is using... its going to be a big wall to over come, mostly it will eliminate you right away. Software is king, and you have to be an expert in it before being considered. In games it seems that they know you won't know their engine, or UI to the engine so its interesting to see how it is, and what they look for/their perspective in looking at someones skill set.

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                #8
                Originally posted by agentfx View Post
                thanks for the explanations and insight. I feel really noob about this question since I bet its obvious to people who've worked in games for any amount of time.
                This is a big difference between film and games. In film if you don't know the software that company is using... its going to be a big wall to over come, mostly it will eliminate you right away. Software is king, and you have to be an expert in it before being considered. In games it seems that they know you won't know their engine, or UI to the engine so its interesting to see how it is, and what they look for/their perspective in looking at someones skill set.
                That's not 'completely' true though. As I'm sure your aware, there's plenty of film studios that use alot of proprietary software. From complete packages right on down to script based solutions, you can't get ahold of through the marketplace. So of course it's not totally realistic for them to expect everyone that applies to have used those before. That's how I look at it anyways. The unreal3 engine, still looks alot like UDK, it just allows for studio's to completely retailor it to fit their needs, instead of having to rely on unrealscript.

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