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UDK K2 or (Kismet Squared (2))

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  • replied
    True, coding is a sickly happy feeling. Sickly in that you hate not getting it work, but happy when it does, and you create something AWESOME!! like parkour.

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  • replied
    I have the luck that my IT teacher at school used to work as coder for Radon Labs years ago.
    He didn't teach us something game-related and handles the subject like any IT teacher would probably do (like a science) and for those who still didn't understand the concept of coding is it sometimes hard to follow his instructions, but he's very open minded for game concepts and encourages us to keep playing around with code. Because if you lose the child in you and stop playing, you actually shouldn't do any programming at all.

    Wise words. You have to enjoy coding, you have to have fun with it. It's the power to be a god after all.

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  • replied
    Well that is so true, i never thought of just drawing it out. Well ill ask my proffesor for some tutoring so i can understand it a lot better. Thanks for the tips guys i really appreciate it.

    My problem was that i sort of just jumped into Unreal Script and tried to self teach and use tutorials which was probably a bad call on my part.

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  • replied
    It's weird. I had a great professor in my college that help me understand programming language. I did Java and C# before, but my skills were sketchy. After my professor broke it down in super simple language, I was breezing through assignments like a madman. Other professors and even the books didn't help as well as this guy did. Sometimes, you need a good tutor who can break it down, not only in your language, but in your dialect also.

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  • replied
    Well, my IT teacher always wants us to draw structure charts, flow charts, pseudo code or UML charts in order to plan our code before we actually get to the coding part. That's nothing for me, I always plan right while I am writing the code, but maybe such charts would help you?

    You can draw lines and whatever you want to get the rough order first. You don't even need to write the explicit code in the beginning, it's totally fine if you just write stuff like "sort the array" and care later about how to actually sort it.

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  • replied
    Originally posted by Crusha K. Rool View Post
    You should not take UnrealScript as your first programming language. It has some concepts that are too hard when you start from 0, I'd say.

    Try learning Java first. There are dozens of good tutorials out there, simply because it is far more spread as a "real" programming language and it's easy to get some working code in Java (and it's very strict when it comes to it's syntax, UnrealScript will go easier on you then). You can learn all the concepts about data types, classes, inheritance and OOP in general in Java.
    IDEs like NetBeans are your friends because the extensive documentation for each class and it's functions is directly readable in the IntelliSense, making learning even easier.

    And afterwards it's not that hard to get the UnrealScript's concept as well. Some things may even appear more logical and comfortable than Java, once you fully understand the concept why things are like they are.

    You shouldn't care much for replication in the beginning, that would be unnecessarily confusing. It can be fixed up later if you are really going for an online game.

    Thanks for the tips, i learned a little bit of java and yes it is annoyingly restrictive, and picky. More so than U script as you need to make sure you indent properly. Im also learning some C++ however, still its not something i can say i will ever be soo good at as i always try to visualize the way the code is working and sometimes its just as you say logical and not very visual.

    Thanks :]

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  • replied
    You should not take UnrealScript as your first programming language. It has some concepts that are too hard when you start from 0, I'd say.

    Try learning Java first. There are dozens of good tutorials out there, simply because it is far more spread as a "real" programming language and it's easy to get some working code in Java (and it's very strict when it comes to it's syntax, UnrealScript will go easier on you then). You can learn all the concepts about data types, classes, inheritance and OOP in general in Java.
    IDEs like NetBeans are your friends because the extensive documentation for each class and it's functions is directly readable in the IntelliSense, making learning even easier.

    And afterwards it's not that hard to get the UnrealScript's concept as well. Some things may even appear more logical and comfortable than Java, once you fully understand the concept why things are like they are.

    You shouldn't care much for replication in the beginning, that would be unnecessarily confusing. It can be fixed up later if you are really going for an online game.

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  • replied
    I know how you feel on that Kazeohin. I basically have the same problem.

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  • replied
    The idea of having a replacement for code using kismet is a bit unrealistic, but I disagree with those who say it's useless.

    I myself have tried to learn code ever since I was 16, back in UT1. I took classes, bought books, talked to friends: I could never seem to get code. I gave up on the idea of learning to code, instead I focused on art. For some reason my brain cannot think in lines of code: call it a mental handicap. Yet, when UT3 was being released: I was reading up on the new material editor, and how designers and artists were essentially "coding" with boxes and lines. For some reason my brain was able to understand this form of programming: before I had even picked up UT3, I read up on Hourences tutorials and tips posted on his website. When I finally got UT3 in my hands, I was able to 'code' awesome materials with crazy effects. When I picked up kismet, I was able to understand that too: It was far more limited than the mat-ed (in my opinion) but I could at least get it. Unfortunately, no matter how many tutorials I download (and I download many) I still do not have the capacity to make even the most basic of game because I don't have the ability to code.

    Let me put it to you this way: If epic released an alternative to coding using unrealscript with kismet/material editor style visual programming: I would probably have a title for sale by now.

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  • replied
    Originally posted by ambershee View Post
    A 'custom script' node would also be handy.
    Time to create one.

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  • replied
    There'll never be a visual replacement for Unrealscript; it's just not practical. Complex game classes are quite simply far too vast and complex to be easily encompassed by a node based system - the material editor is an example of a node based system that generates HLSL and can handle quite a lot more than kismet can handle game logic; however it's by no means a reasonable replacement for writing shaders and has very strong limits.

    If there is indeed a K2 (and evidence suggests there will be), I'm expecting it to be little more than a kismet extension; some much needed flow control statements (for loops as an example).

    A 'custom script' node would also be handy.

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  • replied
    I say keep coding as it is. Once the hurdle of understanding UScript is completed, UScript is insanely easy to use. It just takes research and practice, mostly research.

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  • replied
    Well no i didnt read through it deeply enough : P, but thats some cool stuff.

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  • replied
    Originally posted by TheAgent View Post
    Found this on unreal wiki, its still unannounced and also not sure if its accurate.

    "Kismet 2[confirm] or K2 is a visual programming feature. K2 is not confirmed by Epic Games yet and is therefor pure speculation from the community. K2 first popped up in the recent UDK builds starting with the K2 modifiers such as K2Call found in various classes. There are as well many new classes with the K2 prefix that are very suspect to be related to a new upcoming visual programming feature for the UDK.

    By looking at the classes it's clear that this is designed for a visual programming feature for UDK, they can be found in UDK-2010-07 and UDK-2010-08 in the Engine folder of Development\Source. Some of these classes are named K2Node_Code, K2Node_ForLoop, K2Node_Func and K2Node_IfElse."

    Did you take a look at the "Discussion" page of that article?

    Seems like you are wrong with Kismet 2: http://forums.epicgames.com/showpost...7&postcount=49 - Crusha 15/9/10 14:50 UTC

    Interesting i've noticed it had some stuff related to AI as well but even then this still makes sense i guess. --Eliot 16:02, 15 September 2010 (UTC)

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  • replied
    Yeah wiring boxes is my thing! I used it in Maya, I used it in many other programs so this is really what works best for me. Whether you can make a whole game with K2 or just a little more than what you can do now with Kismet, it would still be very nice!

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