Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

UDK and open source projects incompatibily

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    UDK and open source projects incompatibily

    Hello. I'm really excited about using UDK for a game I'm planning. Although I fully support GNU's spirit, I decided UDK could be the best tool for my needs. A state of the art engine for free, "easy" to use and with such good design decisions. The more I knew about UDK, the more I loved it (and I've worked with other game engines before.)

    I'm a game programmer myself. I thought about creating my own engine or working with an existing FLOSS engine, but many of these are just 3D engines or lack a lot of functionality, and I'm really tired of doing hard and boring work, where I just want to implement game mechanics and have fun as soon as possible.

    Furthermore, I'm planning to make a free clone of a game which has been released for PS3 that uses UE3 engine too: Supersonic Acrobatic Rocket Powered Battle-Cars (sorry Psyonix, but we desperately need a PC port!) How could I replicate physics more accurately than using the same engine? UDK seems perfect.

    But I have a problem. I've read, in the UDK licensing FAQ, that I can't release my project as open source. I don't quite understand it, because it references the EULA, and reading the EULA in Spanish is just IMPOSSIBLE (it's a REALLY poor translation, Epic Games, you should look into it, it might even raise legal issues...) and I couldn't find it in English anywhere.

    Why is it that I can't release my UnrealScript source with my own license? Am I not the copyright holder of my code? I understand UDK grants you the right to write games under some conditions, but... what's the problem if I'm the copyright holder of my own code? AFAIK, as long as my license doesn't interfere with Epic's license (like not allowing my code to be linked against binary libraries and so) and as long as I don't include any Epic source with my own license there shouldn't be any reason why my game can't be open source, even if I inherit functionality from Epic Games' classes (if interfacing is not forbidden by the free license.) I don't see why Epic Games wouldn't want me to release my game with an open source license or how it could affect them.

    I suppose it might have something to do with legal issues regarding royalties, licensing and that stuff, but what if my license just applies to my code? And I mean my code as text form, just like the license would affect a book I wrote myself. I'm not reluctant to other licenses, as long as the free nature is kept, because I'd want my project to be open source. Actually, I don't want to drive the project myself, but make it a community effort.

    Maybe I just understood it the wrong way and this question is actually useless, but as I said, reading the EULA in Spanish is frustrating.

    Thanks

    #2
    You cannot use GPL, UDK's EULA is not compliant with that. All licenses that permit linking with propriety software could be used. For example: Apache License, zLib License, BSD License are fine.

    Stuff you write is owned by you. You own the copyright. You can release the full source of your UDK project, as long as it's with a compatible license. (Note, the code must be 100% written by you, otherwise you cannot define the license).

    Epic Games is not affected by your errors in license choice. It's all you. In general you won't suffer the "wrath" of Epic's lawyers if you don't publish Epics stuff.

    Of course, for actual legal advice, consult a lawyer.

    Comment


      #3
      Dungeon Defense got it's own forum and it's open source, also I've been posting my source code for a few months now and have had no complaints.
      Also I believe the restriction was intended to prevent others from re-releasing UDK code calling it a part of their project under a license that would allow others to take that code for their own non-UDK engine.

      But yes if you want security consult a legal specialist.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Dr Bearhands View Post
        Dungeon Defense got it's own forum and it's open source, also I've been posting my source code for a few months now and have had no complaints.
        Also I believe the restriction was intended to prevent others from re-releasing UDK code calling it a part of their project under a license that would allow others to take that code for their own non-UDK engine.

        But yes if you want security consult a legal specialist.
        It's different. Dungeon Defense is a project supported by Epic Games, and actually the source is just public but it's not a free project (correct me if I'm wrong.)

        It's fun how all of you recommend a lawyer. This would just be a hobby project, I don't think I can get into much legal trouble (at least I hope so! )

        Thanks for the answers, I think it's time to look for a suitable license :P

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by kaoD View Post
          It's fun how all of you recommend a lawyer. This would just be a hobby project.
          It's a simple fact that if you want trustworthy legal advice you should contact a lawyer (if possible a lawyer friend that doesn't charge you money).

          (or a friend in a legal department that handles with software licenses and copyright stuff).

          Comment


            #6
            i want In

            hey KaoD, i too have been wanting to create a better version of SSRPBC for PC but im no good at code. so if you find that it is legal i would be very interested in getting a copy of the code you make. in exchange i could create some cars and levels for you as im quite experienced in creating 3D assets. also if your intrested here a link is the lastest game i have been involved in making.

            www.cannonballclash.com

            im the 3d artist/ animator.

            Comment


              #7
              Everyone shares their Uscript code and helps each other get their scripts working. If you browse the programming forums for 10 minutes, you'll have more code than you can use, and 5 times as much advice on how to change it with altered code examples.

              If you release your UDK game as Open Source... Then, by definition, you are giving everyone permission to alter or use the source code of your game. Even you are not allowed to alter the source code of your game. It's locked to UDK users. Having a communal Uscript project is very different than trying to license everyone to take apart the source code of UDK.
              Uscript != Source Code.
              Open Source = Source Code access = Angry Epic Lawyers.

              That's how I interpret it anyway.
              And, Dungeon Defense is not open source. They are open uscript.

              Comment


                #8
                I think the issue here is that you dont really understand why you want to use GNU, what makes it great is people can sell (and resell) open source software or provide it free under GNU. Under Epic's UDK license you have no rights to allow anyone to resell UDK (including your source for it) because you are making profit from said software which is copyright by Epic.

                I really dont think Epic would try to claim copyright for anything they dont own such as the aforementioned source.

                To that end I recommend a creative commons share-alike, you can specify non-commercial use of the source even if your source is sold as part of a project, you can then pay your royalties to Epic and no one gets hurt.

                Basically the biggest pitfall to GPL is its not really compatible with much ontop of itself, Ive seen people use it for UT3 mods though even if it was 100% legit to do so. Its more of an understanding then fully legal binding contract, some of us arnt in this solely to make money so the lawyers dont tend to **** with the little people much

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by kaoD View Post
                  It's different. Dungeon Defense is a project supported by Epic Games, and actually the source is just public but it's not a free project (correct me if I'm wrong.)

                  It's fun how all of you recommend a lawyer. This would just be a hobby project, I don't think I can get into much legal trouble (at least I hope so! )

                  Thanks for the answers, I think it's time to look for a suitable license :P
                  "free" and "open source" are not always combined together.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Open Unrealscript is not always combined with open source, which we don't have permission to access. Nor do we have permission to give source access to other people.
                    I think you may be confusing your terminology.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X