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Can the game be ported to xBox 360?

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    Can the game be ported to xBox 360?

    What if I made an awesome game using UDK but I want to it to be for xBox 360 only, is there away it can be compiled to run on xBox 360 or it is only for PC? Thanks in advance.

    #2
    now only for pc.... but you can always buy a full license if you game is so awesome and you think you can sell a lot of copies of it

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      #3
      Originally posted by Lifesbreaker View Post
      now only for pc.... but you can always buy a full license if you game is so awesome and you think you can sell a lot of copies of it
      How much does it cost for full license?

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        #4
        Expect in the higher orders of six digits.

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          #5
          Six digits on top of going through a process to get approved for the license by having very talented people on your team that they might know by name or previous work.

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            #6
            Chances are you'll want to get a publisher if you're porting to a console because of how much it costs (the engine plus the publishing royalties which need to be paid up front and however much dev kits and whatnot cost), and in that case they would probably buy a full license for you anyway.

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              #7
              Originally posted by UnspoiledWalnut View Post
              Chances are you'll want to get a publisher if you're porting to a console because of how much it costs (the engine plus the publishing royalties which need to be paid up front and however much dev kits and whatnot cost), and in that case they would probably buy a full license for you anyway.
              So if the game is exceptional and major gaming company thing it is a potential for lots of money, they would buy the licensing for me or would they buy the license to own the game and they pay the license to me? Besides, is UDK designed for a single person to develop their game or is it a professional too, professional enough, that you need team of people to use it?

              What about the graphics part? What if the I wanted my own 3D graphics for my game and sound and so on? Sound to me, this is more for people who want to express their knowledge in game development and can use this to apply for jobs. I think this is not a bad idea.

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                #8
                Originally posted by foody View Post
                So if the game is exceptional and major gaming company thing it is a potential for lots of money, they would buy the licensing for me or would they buy the license to own the game and they pay the license to me?
                You'd need to represent a capable business, not just a reasonable game. The exact contract of ownership would be dictated by your business' negotiations with the publisher. It is not unusual for a publisher to take part ownership of your game and IP, as well as a large proportion of revenue earned from sales.

                Originally posted by foody View Post
                Besides, is UDK designed for a single person to develop their game or is it a professional too, professional enough, that you need team of people to use it?
                It's not common for an individual to use UDK to develop an entire game. Unreal is a higher-tier games engine geared towards development of more complex games. In any case, you'll need skills across multiple disciplines in order to do anything with it (i.e, basic programming, modelling and level design as a foundation).

                Originally posted by foody View Post
                What about the graphics part? What if the I wanted my own 3D graphics for my game and sound and so on?
                You really should be using your own graphics and audio for the game. The existing assets exist to serve more of an example.

                Originally posted by foody View Post
                Sound to me, this is more for people who want to express their knowledge in game development and can use this to apply for jobs. I think this is not a bad idea.
                It can potentially be used that way, but it's important to remember that just throwing a few meshes into an environment does not make one a 'level designer', and changing a few default properties does not make one a programmer

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                  #9
                  If your idea is exceptional AND well-represented both on paper and as a sales pitch, then maybe. A big maybe. Chances are likely that you will get turned away more than once, but don't let that discourage you. If your idea is genuinely good and you show real promise then it is entirely possible to achieve sponsorship.

                  BUT, you don't get something for nothing. You'll have to GO to these sponsors to pitch your ideas with well-laid out documentation on every facet of the game you are developing.

                  You should also have some sort of working demonstration of what it is you are trying to achieve, whether it be an actual playable demo, a machinima or animated scene that shows the gameplay features, models, portfolios of project-related assets for members of your team... basically anything and everything you can muster together before you go to them.

                  The more you have to show, the more serious they will take you. You can't just show up by yourself in casual clothing with a notebook and tell these guys how "OMG I am making the best game EVARRRRRRRR!!! If you pay for it..." because you will get laughed right out of the office.

                  UDK can be used either by yourself or with a team, though most projects done in a reasonable time-frame are handled by at least a small team.

                  For example, I am working on my own project for the time being. Although, once I have all "starting" weapons, 1 character, the basic pickups, 1 gametype, all relevant menus, all basic necessary gameplay elements, and a SOLID design document, I will start recruiting members. This will ensure that everyone that joins the team knows what the game is about, how it plays, how everything should look, and everything not covered by this "demo" is covered thoroughly in the desgn documents. Thus, every single member will be on the same page and know exactly what they need to get cracking on from day 1.

                  Granted, weekly or even daily meetings with all members of the team should still be a prerequisite so that any new ideas can be shared and decided by the team as a whole and so that all people are always on the right track to making every game element converge seamlessly.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by foody View Post
                    So if the game is exceptional and major gaming company thing it is a potential for lots of money, they would buy the licensing for me or would they buy the license to own the game and they pay the license to me? Besides, is UDK designed for a single person to develop their game or is it a professional too, professional enough, that you need team of people to use it?

                    What about the graphics part? What if the I wanted my own 3D graphics for my game and sound and so on? Sound to me, this is more for people who want to express their knowledge in game development and can use this to apply for jobs. I think this is not a bad idea.
                    Yes, if the game was very good and a publisher funded your project they would probably buy you a full license, and in return they would take a large stake in the profits (which is understandable as they can spend millions of dollars, between advertising, salaries, and equipment). Game developers now often have tens if not hundreds of people working on projects, most publishers have inhouse developing companies too or they just buy out a company like Microsoft did with Bungie (I think, might have been a mutual agreement I don't really know) if they are a public incorporation.

                    You CAN develop games on your own, I'm working on a couple of titles by myself and a few others with a small team, but the UDK isn't really a game kit where you can make something ready to go in a few hours. Well you can, but not something that would get a publisher's attention. It's also relatively unlikely that a publisher will just contact you out of the blue, chances are you'll need to try and get an appointment with them and make a decent pitch for their money (they also, like Ambershee said, will probably take the intellectual property).

                    You can make your own assets like models and audio and I would recommend you do, there are plenty of free to use programs for commercial use (like Blender or Anim8or, quite a few others), as well as some 'lite' versions of professional software like 3DS Max, Maya, and XSI but those aren't licensed for commercial use, just educational or non-profit use. Alternately you can buy assets from several places online. You'll need to know how to use the programs somewhat well to make decent models though, as you need to make the meshes, textures, and animations. You'll also need to be prepared to do some programming as not everything will likely be done with Kismet. Level design is also important as generally you need to make it fun to play, and it takes some time to develop the layouts.

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                      #11
                      The basic answer to the original question -- UDK does not run directly on Xbox 360. However, the Unreal Engine does run on Xbox 360, and if you can put together a good demonstration of what you want to do, then you might very well be able to get the right people to get you what you want. But, for now, you're going to be doing it on PC.

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