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  • replied
    I know (10char)

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  • replied
    You wouldn't use IP lawyers for assets.

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  • replied
    Honestly, I don't see the point in protecting game assets.
    People are going to get to them anyway, and the better your game is; the more tempting it'll be, the more people will want to do it.

    If someone uses a BPS asset in a non-commercial way, I'd be more than happy to just shrug it off. If it's good, I might even link to it on the BPS site.
    If they use it to make money, bring in the IP lawyers :P

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  • replied
    Yeah, that's just a game with a CD key or something.

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  • replied
    Originally posted by elmuerte View Post
    And more importantly, steamworks isn't going to "protect" your game assets.
    Exactly, Steam is basically a way to distribute the game, and locking the executable (no other file as far as I know) with encryption, opened upon authentication.

    I really don't worry about my own, self-made game assets at all. If someone wants to extract them and play around with them then that just feels like a compliment for me as an artist (though a really lousy one at that). What I need to do is to follow the following license agreement;

    a) The products must be a part of the compiled program.
    (files should not be accessible in their native formats (.3ds, .max, .X, .FBX, .dts etc. ) from your program folder)

    b) Every possible attempt should be made to protect the products from theft by using resource encryption or some other form of concealment.
    (basic archive encryption will suffice)

    c) The products must exist only within the program code and may not be rebuilt on a user's computer hard drive from the compiled binary.

    d) Every attempt should be made to protect the products from copyright infringement. This includes the methods mentioned in line 1-b but should also include any resources you have at your disposal.


    If the user is simply able to open the file in the Unreal Editor and use an export feature, then I can get seriously sued. Wormbo said something about cooking packages, which seems to be the way to go. I'll have to do a bit more of researching in order to understand exactly what this means, as well as approach the 3d model seller(s) and make sure that I am following their rather strict, but understandable rules. There are too many cowboys in the indie business using X application/asset without proper license...

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  • replied
    Originally posted by eTrust View Post
    Epic may have signed a deal, but I'm pretty sure Steamworks would need source code access (I know I say that a lot, but this one I'm 100% certain on :P)
    And more importantly, steamworks isn't going to "protect" your game assets.

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  • replied
    As far as I know, it's going to be integrated into UDK, or a side package to go along with UDK.

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  • replied
    Originally posted by Piranhi View Post
    Epic have just signed a deal with Valve, this may be what you're looking for:



    From: http://www.epicgames.com/press_releases/steamworks.html
    Epic may have signed a deal, but I'm pretty sure Steamworks would need source code access (I know I say that a lot, but this one I'm 100% certain on :P)

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  • replied
    Yeah it's getting increasingly easier. I haven't used that one, but there are quite a few around. Obviously, the average person isn't going to have much use for it though, as most of the ones that I've played with just export the mesh basically in a frozen animation without the rigging or animations or anything, and it can be a huge annoyance to actually deal with something in an animation like that. The OpenGL ones are even worse, since they do a really poor job in coordinating the meshes and textures.

    But altogether it really isn't anything worth worrying about. The basic anti-piracy protections like key encryption and whatnot is really about all that's necessary. Nothing that is done is uncrackable, even TAGES isn't (albeit, it does an incredibility good job of it at the cost of being really really annoying), but it's not much to really worry about.

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  • replied
    Originally posted by UnspoiledWalnut View Post
    You can rip with OpenGL too, DirectX is a lot easier to do though. I doubt that many people are really going to be doing that though, most of the places I've seen mostly just don't want you to release the models openly, like making it so that they can export them out.
    It's at least as easy to rip assets from memory as export them directly though, given that there are programs that do it for you (that's just the first one I found by googling, so I don't know how good it is). People were doing this when UT3 first came out because you couldn't easily export from the cooked packages.

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  • replied
    Epic have just signed a deal with Valve, this may be what you're looking for:

    Steamworks is a complete suite of publishing and development tools that offers PC game developers and publishers access to the game features and services available through Steam. These include product key authentication, copy protection, auto-updating, social networking, matchmaking, anti-cheat technology and more. The features and services available in Steamworks are offered free of charge and may be used for both electronic and tangible versions of games.
    From: http://www.epicgames.com/press_releases/steamworks.html

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  • replied
    You can rip with OpenGL too, DirectX is a lot easier to do though. I doubt that many people are really going to be doing that though, most of the places I've seen mostly just don't want you to release the models openly, like making it so that they can export them out.

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  • replied
    The cooking process may be considered sufficient, as it strips the raw model file.

    The whole thing strikes me as somewhat futile though - there are programs that hook directly into DirectX and allow every object in the current scene to be saved to disk after all.

    Edit: Oh snap, Wormbo combo.

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  • replied
    By cooking packages (which is a good idea if yu release stuff) you also disable the exporting functions of the editor. You really can't prevent people from applying brute force to extract your content, not even with a custom engine. The content can be used in the game, so all a determined person needs to do is grab the entire scene from memory and cut out the textures and meshes they want.

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  • replied
    You could compile the completed game into an encrypted installer with a CD Key or something. Not sure if that would require the source code or not though, but I'd imagine there would be a way to do it without it.

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