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What kind of licensing is required to get access to the udk source code?

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    What kind of licensing is required to get access to the udk source code?

    It's a random question, but I was thinking about dungeon defense being distributed through xbox live and I assumed that required a custom API for integration into their systems. My question is as stated in the thread title: what kind of licensing do we need to get access to the udk source code for things such as taking advantage of a custom API?

    #2
    I think the full licence which will cost a lot of money.
    Where could be also a new-dev-helping program running by epic games.
    Which will give you maybe some more features if you can make it to the main-page?
    Just assuming but I don't think so.

    Still sticking to the full licence.

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      #3
      Anyone know what the actual cost of the source code would run at?

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        #4
        Expect six digits.

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          #5
          Once again Ambershee beats me to the punch by a few seconds!

          Unless you can make a full game with the UDK and are looking to refine your code for retail release, you don't have the money to get a full licence

          Make a good game and win the Make Something unreal Tourney

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            #6
            Technically there's no source license for UDK. You get a license for UE3 instead. But that is being pedantic.

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              #7
              750 000$ , , start saving :0)

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                #8
                or 350.000 for royalty bearing commercial license (UE3)

                but money isn't enough to gain access to the commercial license, you're product/project needs to be reviewed by epic, to see if it's quality enough for the engine status (AAA class). Since Epic wants to keep their achieved quality status intact, thus only high quality capable developers are allowed.

                there is only one other way to gain access, is to win the makesomethingunreal contest. then you get a commercial license for free + truckload of money, for your contest project (held yearly)

                NOTE:
                each projects needs a seperate license, meaning each game you make requires another license for that game.
                So, either 750.000 or 350.000 license cost per game. Not a one time purchage, and then unlimited development of games (incl. publishing), like some other engines allow.

                All in ALL UDK (not UE3, which is source access), is the best bet, for indie dev's, and has enough space to make your project, without the need for sourcecode.

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                  #9
                  @Saymoo: I /sign you but for indie dev's it's not always the highend engine the best choice.
                  Let's take Unity3D, it's pretty lowcost but also has a pretty low-graphic engine. Anyway in Unity3D is already a engine which can export games into the browser(browser mmo's), export to Iphone.
                  With no performance loss(if you are a good dev).

                  Anyway, this types of games are not next-gen and won't be but where is still a market for that.
                  Just to say UDK would be a good choice for indie devs, because they could start for free with UDK and look trough that thing and even start the game. To make a little demo-level to attract investors with it.
                  After getting money you could buy the full licence.
                  With UDK you could also begin to work and have some sparetime till the milestones.

                  It would be a good but not the best choice, because where is no overall BEST choice.

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                    #10
                    If udk proves to be really good for any type of game, arent you affraid , that you will lose on UE3 sales?
                    excuse my english

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Forsaken View Post
                      @Saymoo: I /sign you but for indie dev's it's not always the highend engine the best choice.
                      Let's take Unity3D, it's pretty lowcost but also has a pretty low-graphic engine.
                      yes true if speaking generally,
                      but since the topic was about UDK and sourcecode for it, i'm staying on that topic. So, for Unreal engine usage, the best bet for indies is the UDK.

                      But overall (as you stated also), all engines combined, it all depends on the needs for the project, the knowlegde, features build in, support and cost, that makes the choice of an engine adoption for the game project. (and unity is a good engine/framework in it's own right, just like UDK/UE3 is or even Torque3D, Gamebryo lightspeed, tech4, vision sdk, etc etc)

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by ellement View Post
                        If udk proves to be really good for any type of game, arent you affraid , that you will lose on UE3 sales?
                        excuse my english
                        Epic shouldn't be afraid of loosing customers at all, some reasons are:
                        • Pro dev's want full control (meaning source access, and premium support), to integrate other third party parts into the engine (e.g. Miles, ai implant, punkbuster, gamespy, havok, scaleform gfx, etc etc etc to name a few), with UDK you can't do this.
                        • UDK is not suited for Pro dev's, since e.g. the license terms are more restrictive compared to UE3, etc.
                        • Many major publishers (retail) require the use of an UE3 license, for integrated patching techniques/ or wholesale ownership of a title (including full sourcecode).
                        • Multiplatform support is absent in UDK, and is only available in the UE3 license.


                        There are more reasons ofcourse... some small some major.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Thanks for all of the useful replies everyone. I was considering the distribution options that indie devs have, and this knowledge will be very useful.

                          I must say, these forums are significantly more kind and forgiving than forums for other engines such as source...

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by saymoo View Post
                            Epic shouldn't be afraid of loosing customers at all, some reasons are:
                            • Pro dev's want full control (meaning source access, and premium support), to integrate other third party parts into the engine (e.g. Miles, ai implant, punkbuster, gamespy, havok, scaleform gfx, etc etc etc to name a few), with UDK you can't do this.
                            • UDK is not suited for Pro dev's, since e.g. the license terms are more restrictive compared to UE3, etc.
                            • Many major publishers (retail) require the use of an UE3 license, for integrated patching techniques/ or wholesale ownership of a title (including full sourcecode).





                            • Multiplatform support is absent in UDK, and is only available in the UE3 license.


                            There are more reasons ofcourse... some small some major.
                            I am getting confused right now. If i have a team of 20 people working on a game using udk for a year, and than we want to sell it, well we cant do this. I want some anticheat system be included as a punkbuster , and as you said many publishers wants us to have full UE3 license for integrated patching techniques. Well i see , it just wasting our time with Udk. What if i make a superb demo level of my superb game , and well i am not able to do anything.

                            well, if we create really something really good , demo level of our game, is there any chance that someone will buy us the UE3? And support us to continue?

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by ellement View Post
                              I am getting confused right now. If i have a team of 20 people working on a game using udk for a year, and than we want to sell it, well we cant do this. I want some anticheat system be included as a punkbuster , and as you said many publishers wants us to have full UE3 license for integrated patching techniques. Well i see , it just wasting our time with Udk. What if i make a superb demo level of my superb game , and well i am not able to do anything.

                              well, if we create really something really good , demo level of our game, is there any chance that someone will buy us the UE3? And support us to continue?
                              I think you are indeed confused!

                              UDK, allows you to publish/distribute your games (as standalones) as you please. for noncommercial projects (free games), you don't need a license, but for a commercial project (earning money simply said, with the game), you need a valid license. UDK commercial license is 99 dollar per title, and 24 percent royalty bearing over the the revenue generated with that game. (first 5000 dollars is royalty free, after that, 24% applies over anything above the first 5000).
                              Again, UDK is a complete framework/toolset to build games using the same features the UE3 has, but without sourcecode to the engine components.
                              UDK and UE3 both use unrealscripts intensively, and thus no direct need for sourcecode (UDK has examples supplied). So an inmidiate need for sourcecode is not needed to build a game. However, if you NEED extra features, like e.g. a specific thirdparty addon for functionality (e.g. ai implant (supreme AI routines)), or feature tweak inside the core of the engine, than you can only do that with the UE3 license, because you need sourcecode access.
                              But, UDK has some thirdparty tools supplied (integrated) already for us (like speedtree, bink, facefx), as a headstart, and to bypass the need for sourcecode.

                              The part about major publishers, is only of interrest for huge projects (500K+ dollar budget projects), who are seeking a publisher (like Eidos, EA, Activision etc, those require sourceaccess, thus ue3 license)

                              For indies, which don't come close to those budgets, this is out of their financial scope and can be ignored (heck major publishers are 99% of all cases, not interested in an indie title).
                              Indies either publish themselves, or through a indie friendly publisher (steam, direct2drive, Johwood etc).
                              But since the question was asked, i answered, even if it doesn't apply to UDK users.

                              I suggest you need to read the License document (see link at the top of the site menu) and license questions answered forum thread, to learn more about the usage with UDK.

                              UDK is, to be very clear, very complete for game creation/publishing, as long as you don't need sourcecode access, and can live with the license terms for it.


                              as for you question regarding someone willing to buy the ue3 license for your project.. It happends occasionally, that a project is funded externally, or sponsored if you prefer that word. Even given the engine for free, to add the game to a franchise of the engine builder (special deal). E.g. Valve software (source engine, halflife series) did just that with the creators of the Counterstrike game (was still mod back then), because of it's popularity, and valve could benefit from it. Epic, does the same kind of thing, through their annual makesomethingunreal contest, the winner gets a free ue3 license.

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