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Need Help Upgrading or Buying PC for UDK

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    Need Help Upgrading or Buying PC for UDK

    Hi,
    I have a PC that is 3-4 years old and I am not sure if I should try and upgrade it, or get a better one to work with the UDT.

    3GB RAM
    Intel Pentium D 2.8GHz (single)
    Radeon X300/X550/X1050 Series
    Power Supply- standard 305 watt.
    WinXP Home Ed

    So what do you think? Should I get another one, or can I make this usable with UDT for a couple of hundred bucks?

    #2
    You mean UDK - Yes you could stand to use a better PC, that one would be pretty sluggish when it comes to editing anything larger, and your framerates in game would not be good at high settings.

    I can't see you getting by with upgrading a single part, as chances are that computer is so old that you couldn't use a modern PCIe card on it, even if it is PCIe your PSU is too weak to handle its power requirements - and on top of this there's a principle called bottlenecking, which means that your PC will only perform as well as its worst component. If your CPU is slow, it doesn't help much having a top of the line graphics card.

    So I would really recommend a modern multicore Intel PC, and a modern PCIe videocard, no less than 4 gb RAM, and a 750W PSU or higher.

    I'm not saying you can't run UDK editor or its games with your setup, but it won't run that well.

    Comment


      #3
      I don't know where that T came from.

      Anyway thanks for your help Bersy. I'll keep the old PC to play my old games and get a newer one for UDK.

      Comment


        #4
        I don't think you have to pay a lot of money for a good PC.
        How much money do you have?

        Comment


          #5
          Sure -

          Here is my setup I bought 1 year ago, I know there are better ones available now but this does me just fine for Unreal Engine 3:

          Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550
          8 GB OCZ RAM
          Asus Maximus II Formula Motherboard
          Nvidia 9600GT Silent
          Zalman 750W Silent PSU
          Western Digital Velociraptor 300 gb - 10k RPM C drive (plus some externals for storage)

          With framerate smoothing turned off I get between 1-200 FPS @ stock CPU settings & highest in-game settings, 1280x1024. Also ample memory for using the editor, a modeling program, and several other programs while also running the game.
          If I upgrade something anytime in the next year it'll probably be the video card.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Davaris View Post
            Hi,
            I have a PC that is 3-4 years old and I am not sure if I should try and upgrade it, or get a better one to work with the UDT.

            3GB RAM
            Intel Pentium D 2.8GHz (single)
            Radeon X300/X550/X1050 Series
            Power Supply- standard 305 watt.
            WinXP Home Ed

            So what do you think? Should I get another one, or can I make this usable with UDT for a couple of hundred bucks?
            Whatever you do, that PSU has gotta go. It's dangerous to have such a generic low quality PSU in a gaming system. There are cost effective name brand PSUs out there. You need at least a 650-750W PSU. That'll keep you in pretty good shape for whatever else you want to upgrade in the system.

            Since you're on the ATI side of the fence, the 5850 just released is a screamer of a card. There are also other cheaper 5000-series cards available now too. For all intents and purposes socket 775 is EOL. Go with entry level P55 or X58 mobo and choose whatever CPU is entry level quad for that mobo. The memory will also have to be upgraded too, as I doubt your current system is DDR3 based. You'll have a very nice OCable system with that setup that will be pretty future proof for the next 2 years.

            You'll probably be able to use your same case, dvd drive and hard drive. The rest will need to be upgraded though as technology has evolved far enough to obsolete AGP slots, DDR/DDR2 memory and have much higher power supply requirements now.

            Comment


              #7
              Is not nessesary to buy a "ultra-High-End" PC.
              Look.
              I have this:
              AMD Athlon X2 6000+
              2GB Ram
              Asus M2A-VM
              Ati Radeon 4670 512MB DDR3
              And the editor runs really god. No low frame rate.

              Comment


                #8
                I built my computer for ~ $1500 about a year and a half ago. But with increases in tech, I could buy the same for I'd guess around half that. Build your own and you'll save money.


                As far as GFX card, I'd go with older cards in SLI or Crossfire. Really look into it, but price versus performance it might be worth it.

                Comment


                  #9
                  SLI and Crossfire are worthless, you're better off just getting a high end single card, especially when it comes to development.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Zomy View Post
                    Is not nessesary to buy a "ultra-High-End" PC.
                    Look.
                    I have this:
                    AMD Athlon X2 6000+
                    2GB Ram
                    Asus M2A-VM
                    Ati Radeon 4670 512MB DDR3
                    And the editor runs really god. No low frame rate.
                    Those specs are a lot lower than I expected. Thanks for the info Zomy.


                    I was thinking of getting a second hand gaming PC this time, so am thinking in the $700-$800 range. So what I'd like is a rig that would have been cutting edge a couple of years back, but can still play today's games on lower settings.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      From Techspot


                      I suppose that the processors that run the above quickly, will also be ok for the editor

                      The i7 920 says hi! Fast at stock and overclocks well. Pair it with 3x2GB DDR3

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I feel your Pain I am in the same exact boat. : ( I am serious about making some good games so I guess I better get to Computer shopping.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          My general recommendation, is if you want to be comfortable developing, you're going to need 2 to 4 times the power that you're targetting for users.

                          Of course, you can do it with anything that will render what you want, but if you don't at least have a ton more ram and at least some more CPU power than the minimum, developing is going to be painfully slow.

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