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    Stripping UDK Down to its bare minimum...

    For a project I'm working on, our team needed to strip down the UDK to its bare minimum so we can start building from something as close to the base engine code as possible.

    There are already a few threads on these boards about how to do this, but I've talked to a few people irl and they still are having trouble removing all of the extra UT stuff shipped with the UDK... so I figured I might as well share this if anyone needs it.

    I've deleted lots of content, went through each config file line by line removing all ut package references... and well, I was left with a Content folder weighing in at about 2.5MB (2.2MB being UI_Fonts_Final.upk, .3MB being an empty room)

    After a few late hours, I've managed to have a working* standalone...

    I'm not sure about the legality of posting this here as none of the base engine files are changed in any way but I do have 1 Epic UT script, that being UTGame.UTCharInfo. There is also the default movies and splash that ships with the UDK as well.

    I will be updating my blog post with more info as I do more research/toying around.

    http://forecourse.com/?p=141

    #2
    Thanks for this im testing it now.

    EDIT: Worked fine adding it to master guide

    Comment


      #3
      Just curious, why would you strip all the code to bare minimum when you could just as easily ignore it?

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Taxxem View Post
        Just curious, why would you strip all the code to bare minimum when you could just as easily ignore it?
        because you can't include any UT code in a commercial project. Best to have a completely clean slate, that way you don't accidentally derive off a UT class or something and forget to fix it.

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          #5
          Most people with the UDK wont be making commercial games because thats against the EULA, im sure theres another release for people that actually have a license that removes the UT code

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            #6
            Actually it’s completely legal to make a game with the UDK just it’s against the EULA to release a game with any UT code or assets.

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              #7
              Originally posted by wildicv View Post
              Actually it’s completely legal to make a game with the UDK just it’s against the EULA to release a game with any UT code or assets.
              I hope someone is going to make a tutorial about coding a game from scratch
              haven't started yet still learning how to do this.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Kylegar View Post
                because you can't include any UT code in a commercial project. Best to have a completely clean slate, that way you don't accidentally derive off a UT class or something and forget to fix it.
                I could be misinterpreting what has been said here, but Steve Polge in the following thread seems to imply that UT code is fine, it's only assets that are restricted.

                Some UT3 assets are included with the UDK - you'll have to see if those are adequate. Note that if you ever plan on making your mod commercial, you cannot use Epic owned assets in the mod.

                Use of Epic's code in a commercial mod is not restricted.
                http://forums.epicgames.com/showthre...he+mod.&page=2

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                  #9
                  aeonflame is correct. Only the actual Assets are covered by those restrictions since they are part of UT3 specifically.

                  The code itself isn't restricted since, in theory, its all Epic code anyways.

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                    #10
                    Most people with the UDK wont be making commercial games because thats against the EULA
                    That only applied for the Unreal Engine 2 Runtime. However, the UDK allows commercial games but you must pay 25% royalties after you make more than $5000 in revenue.

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                      #11
                      what i meant by that is Most people are probably students or hobbyists that cant afford to or dont want to make commercial games, so they are just using the engine to play around with. im not saying you cant. Its agaisnt the EULA to sell games you make with the UDK without paying for the license is all i mean

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                        #12
                        It costs $99 to start "selling" a game. Not a lot of money.

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                          #13
                          You need to use some common sense about this. No matter what you do with the UDK you are using their code. So if that were the case then UDK would be pretty much pointless to make a commercial game or anything worth selling. The script is to give you a head start so you don't need to figure out AI or figure out movement. Epic is basically saying here is all this awesome script for you, do what you wish but give us credit and if you make money hand some of it over, oh and btw don't use any of our contents because that is specific to UT3 which is a game we created.

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                            #14
                            I think the core idea of this is to begin a project that has no initial link to UT at ALL!. As some of us are moving towards making a completely non UT related game with the UDK, we don't want to ACCIDENTALLY include an asset that is from an unreal game. Incidentally I agree with others I am really great full for the UDK release but would have liked it if the installer ASKED if I wanted the UT3Demo or just a blank slate to work with. I think the other issue here with stripping out a lot of the code base is that it directly links to the unreal assets that we don't want to use for custom projects. Granted when you publish the project it ignores assets that where not used. I personally would just prefer not to have them in my build directory so it doesn't get accidentally included. At the end of the day when Im building my levels for the game I don't want to see any unreal assets in the Content Browser, just my own ones.

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                              #15
                              Thanks Allar.
                              Nice job working all of that out so the rest of us don't have to individually.
                              Big ups.

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