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    Blender texturing

    Hi guys.
    I am really wondering about this whole texture process.
    So far, I textured a few models I created myself, by marking the seams and then create the uvmap, exporting that into PS, and then import it into UDK.

    I mean, texturing big models or advanced models must really take alot of time. How can someone create a house in a singlemodel?
    What am I missing? Something major with multiple UV maps? Or is it really that bad to texture models?

    If someone please could explain to me the whole process, that would be much appriciated.

    - Thank you, NF

    #2
    when creating a uvw map for a more complex mesh you really have to think about where you need the seems to be so that people can"t see them in-game, i find the best way to learn is to look how other artists have done their content, your model is for me the classic example of what will be hard to do.
    i"m no pro but in this model i would un-wrap the spars+posts to their own uvw islands, for the frame it doesn't matter what you do the seems will be visible

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      #3
      Originally posted by Ferdynater View Post
      create the uvmap, exporting that into PS, and then import it into UDK.
      do you mean you export the UV layout, open it in PS and then paint it. how do you know witch part your painting and witch way that part texture will be displayed? sounds like hassle especially with a UV that has lots of similar pieces like yours

      there are a couple of ways witch come to mind.

      1: after I unwrapped and layed out the UV for the diffuse texture I click the "create new image" button at the bottom of the UV editor window, then I switch both the 3d view and UV editor into "texture paint" mode, I then paint the basic colour straight onto the model (witch also paints the image in the UV editor as well, some times if its a really complicated model I also paint arrows on so I know witch way that bit is displayed), then I save the image as a TGA file, I open the TGA in gimp to add the details (switching back and forth between blender and gimp to check the results), and that's it.

      2: at the point in the modelling process shown in your pic you can just open an image in the UV editor (you wont get great results at edges of your model though, but you could rearrange the layout to fit the image).

      3: you can assign textures to different materials and then assign the materials to different faces of your model (you cant guarantee good results though and the textures work better if they are tilable).

      using the first method is what I do, you can also use texture samples and then use copy/paste in gimp/PS to copy say a wood texture onto very specific parts of the texture for your model witch can save a lot of time. you can also overlap parts of the UV (its only the lightmap UV that you cant have overlapping faces). you can also use multiple UV's and mismatch some of the methods as well. you just need to find the method that suits you and your model best.

      I mean, texturing big models or advanced models must really take alot of time.
      yes texturing can take a long time.

      How can someone create a house in a single model?
      with method 1 you could overlap all the walls/doors/window frames that will have the same texture/s or colours, with method 3 you could just assign a material with say a wood effect texture to the window frames and a material with say a brick texture to walls....ect. if I was going to make a house I would do it in pieces floors/windows/walls....ect

      hope this helps

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        #4
        Thanks a bunch, however, i'm still a little confused. I figured out the paint thing in Blender, and that makes it easier.
        - But, do I still have to mark so many seems? And I noticed that for example player models have like 2 texture sets total. One for the head, and one for the body.
        Is that a good idea?

        For example, you say you can create a house using method one. But I would assume that the UVmap the house would have, would be very tight packed! - Or am I missing something major again?
        Thanks alot - NF

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          #5
          a lot depends on what you are making, most things only have 1 texture/material, characters in UT have 2 this gives more detail to the textured area.
          you have to consider the role of the model in game eg a fence would be used many times but a house a few times. i don't think there is One rule fits all.

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            #6
            In texture map faces can overlap, but not in lightmap . So you should make every piece as big as possible here in texture map.

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              #7
              Originally posted by Ferdynater View Post
              Thanks a bunch, however, i'm still a little confused. I figured out the paint thing in Blender, and that makes it easier.
              glad to hear it helped

              do I still have to mark so many seems?
              well you could try optimizing your mesh a bit more witch would mean less edges so less seems to mark, you could also try thinking of different ways to mark the seems.

              And I noticed that for example player models have like 2 texture sets total. One for the head, and one for the body. Is that a good idea?
              as GEODAV said its up to you if you think a model needs more then one texture.

              For example, you say you can create a house using method one. But I would assume that the UVmap the house would have, would be very tight packed! - Or am I missing something major again?
              Thanks alot - NF
              you should try to have as little empty space as possible on textures so it would be quite tightly packed but you can overlap parts of the UV and put some edges together. although as I said if I was going to make a house a player could go in I would do it in sections because it would be easier to do the texturing and lightmap UV, but if I was doing a house the player cant go in I would make it as one model.

              its up to you what you think is best for your models.

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                #8
                First off never use the Smart unwrap tool, its awful and it makes all the Islands different sizes, and that's bad cause you will have different texture resolution all over the model. Secondly you can make an entire house and place it udk but the work process alone for it would be more awful than just making it in modular pieces, you would need to make collision all over the model and make sure the character doesn't get stuck or walk through a wall. then you need to unwrap the entire house and make sure the player cant see the seams. I would just make it all modular pieces and apply the collision on each piece, not only is this easier, but it is more beneficial to resolution, sure you have to build it again in udk but that's part of the fun, you will have a bunch of pieces like legos to build other things

                Also if it's texturing in blender make sure you go back into "Object" mode and hit CTRL+A the reset the location Scale and rotation of the object so when you unwrap it its not distorted.

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