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How to build a realistic concrete material?

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    How to build a realistic concrete material?

    So I've been working with UDK for a bit trying to learn the material system to make it look less like a lot of UE3 based games. A major problem I'm having is that I can't for the life of me get concrete to render right. Here's an example:

    In UDK:

    http://i.imgur.com/7MdzY.jpg

    In CryEngine:

    http://i.imgur.com/Qnr4C.jpg (please ignore the crappy UVs)

    Notice the plastic sheen on the left hand side of the UDK wall texture. I know it is something to do with the specular and the lighting model, but I don't know exactly what. I'm still lost in a lot of the tutorials about the material system. Right now that wall material is extremely basic, just a diffuse, normal, and b/w specular texture plugged into each of their respective slots. What UDK Kung Fu can I use to get the concrete looking a bit flatter and less plastic? Is it specular power, or do I change the light model? I'm just asking for a bit of direction, because this is really annoying me and I don't know where to begin. The texture looks decent in CryEngine, it's flatter. When I put it into UDK it takes on this plastic sheen. Thanks.

    #2
    Take out the specular; concrete is not shiny, it should not have any specular.

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      #3
      If say leave the spec (as it brings out the normal map) but also plug a constant into the specular power and mess with that. Also, using color in the spec that's roughly opposite of the diffuse texture could even the tone a bit. Try adding a soft, subtle blue color to the spec.

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        #4
        I tried leaving out the spec but it still doesn't get lightmapped properly without it in.

        Originally posted by JessieG View Post
        If say leave the spec (as it brings out the normal map) but also plug a constant into the specular power and mess with that. Also, using color in the spec that's roughly opposite of the diffuse texture could even the tone a bit. Try adding a soft, subtle blue color to the spec.
        Heh, I didn't realize you could use color in spec maps (I come from idtech modding so a lot of my knowledge of current gen stuff is missing). What bits would I colorize, the lighter bits or the darker bits in the black and white map? Also does this mean that if I have a black and white spec map it's more suitable for the specular power than the actual spec? Forgive my ignorance.

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          #5
          What do you mean it doesn't get lightmapped properly? Do you have a picture?

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Dashiva View Post
            What bits would I colorize, the lighter bits or the darker bits in the black and white map?.
            You can use any colored texture as a specular map, just like your diffuse colors. The color of the specular texture defines the color of the reflection, so if you have a predominantly blue spec map, your specular highlights will also be predominantly blue.

            Originally posted by Dashiva View Post
            Also does this mean that if I have a black and white spec map it's more suitable for the specular power than the actual spec?
            Yes you could. This is commonly called a gloss map. There's also no reason not to use a greyscale texture for the main specular texture, if you don't need colored specular reflections.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by nabiul View Post
              What do you mean it doesn't get lightmapped properly? Do you have a picture?
              It lightmaps fine it just looks out of place with no specular map, so I think a small spec bump might help.

              Comment


                #8
                Concrete definitely does have a sepcular to it. especially where the surface is in contact with other things allot (think the edges of concrete curb stones). The best way to achieve a better look is with a more varied spec map with slight blue-ish tinge to it (gives the cold look). From the two shots you posted, CE2 has a global illumination lighting built into it, you will need to match that in UDK by using ambient light levels which is why your textures are looking overly dark.

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