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Is 3ds max or maya worth it?

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    Is 3ds max or maya worth it?

    So I have been with blender for a couple of years now, and I like it. AS far as I know the only disadvantage is the lack of support directly to blend from the udk and other programs. Even though there are work around to this problem it still is a hassle. So I have been looking at maya and 3dsmax. So i would like to hear your opinion on if I should go ahead and get maya or 3dsmax. Is it worth going away from a program I know and learning a completely new one. You don't need to factor in the expenses of the programs.

    #2
    Only if you can really afford to, I mean, taking that $4000 (license + subscription) plunge is certainly not for the faint of heart. There is support for Blender in UDK, as long as you hook up with MCampagnini, or whoever that was around these forums. That's who I've been turning to, and I don't regret it. If you have the big money, then fine, 3ds Max seems to be the better of the two supported Autodesk tools for UDK, but Maya's, imo, easier to use.

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      #3
      It depends on what you want to do, if you want to have a job with 3D modeling, then yes. If you're just a hobbyist, then probably not.

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        #4
        Hello,

        If you are throwing the costs out the window, then Yes it is totally worth it. Max and Maya are the industry standards for a reason. They have tons more offer, and after working with them for a while, are quite easier to use. Blender is great for the hobbyist, as someone else here pointed out. But for really getting eye popping and professional looking models. The Autodesk programs are where it is at.

        Also, if money is not an issue, also look at sculpting programs like Mudbox and Zbrush. Both are used heavily in the gaming industry. It is just more of a personal preference on which of the programs types and styles you wanna use. I prefer Max and Mudbox. But other Prefer Maya and Zbrush. It is really your choice. Autodesk has a full 3 year free use program for students, and a 1 year program for unemployed personnel to test and learn their programs. Take advantage of them. Test drive them before you make a decision.

        Thanks,

        Lee

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          #5
          I've been using blender for roughly a yonk and I once had a time where I tried to learn 3ds max as well. The biggest hurdle was getting used to the controls, they were completely different to blenders and very daunting. If you want to get a job working for an industry company then yes, get an autodesk program. They'll laugh you out the door if you only know blender. As for my situation, I am not planning on getting an industry job, preferring to go indie, so for now blender fits the bill. It's free, I know how to use it and I have no requirement for an autodesk solution. Also remember that blender offers a very wide range of tools that (correct me if I'm wrong) the autodesk ones don't. That works both ways though, there are plenty of tools in maya and max that you won't find in blender.

          As for the comment that you can only make really good pieces in maya or max, I resent that. That's like saying you can only create truly good paintings with oil, and not watercolour. They are different tools. Also, maya and max are the programs used in universities, so of course they produce good art. If blender was used in universities to the same extent that autodesk is, then it would be the other way around. The artists make the art, not the mediums.

          So back to your question, yes. You should try an autodesk solution, if only to see if you like it. I'd like to be a blender fanboy here but that would be limiting.

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            #6
            Just to chime in, you are absolutely right about the support between UDK and Blender. But it's also the UV tools that I feel are better in max than Blender. It drove me nuts not being able to do something in Blender that was so simple in Max. I still use Blender, however, and love the program - the UI is more intuitive than max imo. If you are in 3d modelling every day, then the max purchase will be worth it. It's only going to pay off if you commit yourself to it.

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              #7
              Hello,

              I was not meaning that you cannot get great graphics from Blender. Sorry if I misspoke. What I was meaning is that Max and Maya, are very different and have a lot more tools than Blender. I have used all 3 and my personal fav is Max. I am not a fan boy, but I know the limitations of all 3 and Blender is the most limited of the 3. Max, when you take the money aspect out is a better program to me personally, and that is a big deal. Because I am self taught. I know you probably are as well, but I am speaking from my own experiences, and others that are in UDKLearning.

              Thanks,

              Lee

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                #8
                I don't know of anything Blender can do that 3ds Max or Maya can't--but I know plenty of things that 3ds Max can do that others can't---mainly the modeling tools, there's just so many useful things.

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                  #9
                  Blender has fluid simulation! Although I think Maya has a tool for this out of the box, Max users do not - but then, my pro-fluid sim agenda has been clear for quite some time.

                  Food for thought: in the GOW3 interviews, artists admitted that most modeling was done in 3ds Max and animation done in Maya, but in the end it boiled down to user preference. The tech artists created a really nice rig in Maya, but a similar rig could have been made in Max. Sadly, I don't know Maya well enough to know how easy such a rig is to develop, but in Max, it'd probably take me an entire day to set up, at least (maybe I'm just slow).

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                    #10
                    In some cases it can be preference, but for polygonal modeling 3ds Max has tools that make it much easier, since polyboost was integrated.

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                      #11
                      being a self taught , used both 3DSmax, Blender & Zbrush. I prefer blender over anyothere 3d software, its easy to use for me, since I like to work more with my keyboard. however, ease of loop deletion and some other tools are very good in 3dsmax.
                      @MCampaigni , Although Blender uvtools are not as good as 3dsMax, but they are not lame, u can always use "f6" to get more options for your unwrap.
                      Its just my 2 cents. Since 3dsmax is defacto leader, i do stress everyone, looking for professional work to work on student version of 3dsmax, and learn 3d in outs with blender.

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                        #12
                        @dukejb thanks, im aware. my statement still stands.

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by darthviper107 View Post
                          In some cases it can be preference, but for polygonal modeling 3ds Max has tools that make it much easier, since polyboost was integrated.
                          I'm guessing this is why much of the modeling for GOW3 was done in 3ds Max. I'm not very familiar with Maya's or blender's modeling tools, but I've been very happy since the devs integrated polyboost in Max. Newer versions of 3ds Max even have some decent retopology tools.

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                            #14
                            So being a freelance artist I have worked with XSI, maya, max, modo zbrush and mudbox. think of all the tools you use to model, 99.9% of the time theres only 6 tools that I use (edge loop, cut, bevel/chamfer, extrude, lattice and merge/weld) every modeling program on the planet has those 6 tools, even $100 SILO has those functions(coincidentally SILO is an amazing modeling program) . Max and Maya are the ones everyone grew up with and people are comfortable with, so if you are serious about doing 3d in a studio environment, pick up the educational versions or 30 day trials, and learn where the top 10 tools you normally use are, and then remember that. But im completely serious when I say that they are all toolboxes that can do the same thing, some of them just do certain things a little bit differently(which may or may not be better).

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                              #15
                              There's tools in Max though that no other program has an equal for---like Flow Connect--which inserts loops and adjusts them according to the flow of the mesh--so if you have a mesh that you're working on and realize later you need more segments to make it smoother, you can put in a loop with Flow Connect and it'll adjust to fit the curve.

                              Or like with making things like pipes--in Max, you can make a spline, and then set it to renderable which will allow you to set the radius and segments, and you can fully edit the mesh as a spline. In other programs, you'd create a spline path and then extrude your cylinderical shape along it, and if you wanted to change anything you'd have to do it again (unless they've changed that in the last few versions).

                              Or for instance, there's other tools people have made, like UnChamfer, which removes chamfers in a mesh, or Subdivision Reversion, which reverses a subdivided model. No other programs have that ability.

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