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    True cylinder?

    Howdy artists,
    I'm a doctor not a.. erm, I mean I'm a programer, not an artist However, as a one-man-show, I'm stuck with some amount of that stuff.
    As such, I'm trying to focus on learning *just* Unreal Editor inside and out, rather than attempting to deal with UDK + maya or something.

    I only have to deal with fairly basic shapes. So, I'm doing my primitive 3d "art" work, by using
    BSP brush -> slap textures on -> convert to StaticMesh

    Works reasonably well... until I want to work with real curves, rather than straight edges.
    Using the preconfigured BSP shaped brush of "cylinder"... is a solid octagonal pillar, rather than a true cylinder.
    Just increasing the surface plane count wont work, because, (in addition to being a cheezy hack ) it wont let me stretch out a single texture around the full curved surface (I think?)


    Can someone tip me off to a way to getting actual cylinders to work with, purely within UDK, please?

    I've tried a couple of google searches, but no luck so far.

    #2
    in 3d games, you NEVER use real curves, everything is made from polygons, so the most you will get, is a N-sided polyhedron, but never actual real curves

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      #3
      BSP is only for blocking out a level, although you can just convert to static mesh as what you were doing however, smoothing the normals doesn't work.

      If you are strapped on cash, just download blender and model the things you need.

      Other options are Maya and 3DsMax.

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        #4
        Actually, I have both max and maya for free. I just really, really hate mental context switching between two programs. I sorta have A.D.D. It's difficult enough to focus on one thing at a time.
        Blaaaaahhhh ....

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          #5
          Originally posted by vblanco View Post
          in 3d games, you NEVER use real curves, everything is made from polygons, so the most you will get, is a N-sided polyhedron, but never actual real curves
          Odd how maya(?) supports creating 3d objects through nice B-splines or something then? I thought that modern 3d hardware supported texture mapping on that sort of surface these days. Would be rather surprising then if UDK doesnt support that.
          And the UT barrel object looks very very smooth-cylinder-like.

          edit: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3...-on-directx-11

          There are 2 demos in the DirectX SDK; SubD10, SubD11 for DirectX 10/11 implemenations respectively of the techniques described in this article.

          Comment


            #6
            That barrel was modeled in an external program where the faces along the barrel has smoothed normals. You only need to focus on one program at a time. Model in your preferred modeling program, then export to UDK. If that's hard for you to handle, then maybe game design isn't for you. Since there is a lot more going on than just one program.

            I suggest you spend some time slowly learning a modeling program and about 3D in general, then moving on to udk.

            No Game Engine can model ( Some don't even support BSP anymore! ) Unless its terrain and that's limited sculpting.

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              #7
              Originally posted by philbrown View Post
              Would be rather surprising then if UDK doesnt support that.
              The built-in Editor tools that you are using are for creating what is commonly called CSG or Constructive Solid Geometry.
              There are numerous sites on the web with information on CSG such as wikipedia etc.
              CSG is a simple solid modelling technique that uses low-polygon 3D primitives and boolean operations (Add, Subtract, etc.) to construct more complex objects.
              This type of modelling system is what many early game engines used to create the low-polygon-count geometry for the game levels.
              UDK still retains much of the CSG modelling from their earlier engines, although you typically would not use it in any production game development release.
              It is restrictive on what you can create and is mostly only usable for level design prototyping or very basic level design like you would see in Unreal Tournament and UT2003/2004.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by philbrown View Post
                Odd how maya(?) supports creating 3d objects through nice B-splines or something then? I thought that modern 3d hardware supported texture mapping on that sort of surface these days.
                All geometry is tessellated into triangles, including subdivision surfaces. The apparent smoothness is a combination of the degree of physical tesselation, and the interpolation of vertex normals to smooth the shading. Tesselation defines the silhouette, and DX10+ benefits from additional dynamic tesselation on the GPU.

                Splines are no different, they're just subdivided into straight lines. A nurbs surface is just a two-dimensional patch of splines. Offline renderers like Maya can use ray tracing and other sampling techniques to avoid tesselating the surface, but in real time they all end up as triangulated geometry. Even quads are tris.

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