Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How do I set up a tiling texture simular to this in UDK?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    How do I set up a tiling texture simular to this in UDK?

    Hi Everyone,

    I'm creating a texture that's going to be similar to the way this one is set up:

    http://www.artbywaqas.com/HELP/udk/2_010.jpg


    I know how to apply and tile materials to a BSP wall in UDK but how would I apply multiple textures like these together?



    BTW this image is from 3D Game Textures -Create Professional Game Art Using Photoshop by Luke Ahearn. It's an amazing book and I highly recommend it.

    #2
    If BSP was used for that, the floor is made of multiple perfectly squared BSP faces, not 1 BSP face. All those textures are then applied to each face.

    Say the room is set up with 4 BSP faces across and 6 BSP faces down, you can set up a grid in photoshop to match this. If you want to use 1024 textures, that would be 1024x4 across and 1024x6 down) and take pieces from that that you want as the textures.

    Comment


      #3
      Might look cool, but using that many bsp's are going to give you issues. I'm guessing that was not done in UDK, as you can't do it in UDK in any clean manner.

      Comment


        #4
        Yeah, it's possible with BSP, but better with a static mesh. Especially since you can make one square piece and just duplicate it throughout the scene. I can faintly see the seams so it's definitely modular pieces.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Graylord View Post
          Might look cool, but using that many bsp's are going to give you issues. I'm guessing that was not done in UDK, as you can't do it in UDK in any clean manner.
          That's really not much BSP work. There are dozens of UT3 maps with thousands of BSP brushes and they work just fine.

          Comment


            #6
            It's best to make modular static meshes.

            Comment


              #7
              There are dozens of UT3 maps with thousands of BSP brushes and they work just fine.
              Most assuredly not.

              The UT3 maps have a couple of brushes each.

              Comment


                #8
                Yeah, I was thinking using static meshes would work best for this way too. It's the only way I can think of to create this type of texturemap set up for a floor or walls.

                I wonder which is more resource hungry static meshes with collision or bsps?

                Comment


                  #9
                  BSPs are definitely more resource intensive compared to low poly meshes with a single material.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by artbywaqas View Post
                    Yeah, I was thinking using static meshes would work best for this way too. It's the only way I can think of to create this type of texturemap set up for a floor or walls.

                    I wonder which is more resource hungry static meshes with collision or bsps?
                    static meshes and creating collision/blocking volumes is the most optimized. Creating meshes with simple collision primitives in your 3d package is easier, but not as optimized as using blocking volumes within Unreal. For your purposes, you will be ok making colliders in your 3d package, taking the easy route.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by jak_carver View Post
                      static meshes and creating collision/blocking volumes is the most optimized. Creating meshes with simple collision primitives in your 3d package is easier, but not as optimized as using blocking volumes within Unreal. For your purposes, you will be ok making colliders in your 3d package, taking the easy route.
                      Blocking volumes are useful for walls but not recommended for floors since it won't allow physical materials to be recognized so only default footstep sounds will play regardless of what you may be walking on. Also, I'm pretty sure collision meshes are needed for any type or damage event or traces in code.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Not true, this is how we work in production

                        Comment


                          #13
                          The coding part? I wasn't entirely sure, but either way, blocking volumes on floors never provide a change in the footstep sounds for me depending on what physical material is assigned to the mesh.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by JessieG View Post
                            The coding part? I wasn't entirely sure, but either way, blocking volumes on floors never provide a change in the footstep sounds for me depending on what physical material is assigned to the mesh.
                            We have engineers that do a lot of custom stuff, so you're probably right pertaining to UDK development.

                            Either way, its a pretty good idea to use blocking volumes when possible to optimize your memory usage. Using collision primitives with your static meshes is good when it makes sense. It's all about fine tuning and balance.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X