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Liquid Physics possible?

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    Liquid Physics possible?

    I'm thinking of manipulating small pools of liquid with point-gravity systems over a 3d level in first person.
    I got the effect set up pretty neat, using a few barrels so far - But I just figured I have no idea how to create a watery looking object for this.

    Is there any good examples of liquid physics in udk-games?
    It doesn't need to be extremely "watery", something amongst the lines of "pixel junk shooter" -> Youtube link! would do plenty. (Watery physics starts from about 0:20 seconds)

    Could squares of softbodies be the answer? I am not really sure what kind of system I would need to manipulated them (they need to get added together and splitted apart based on the physics..)

    Anyone got any ideas whatsoever?

    #2
    The closest you'll come to water physics is liquid surfaces (just waves on physical impulses) and some advanced materials. There's no physical liquid in UDK.

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      #3
      Yea that's pretty much what I expected, thanks for your answer tho.

      I think I will try using softbodies to simulate metaballs, but it might get really heavy on the calculations..
      With a nice advanced material, and some small particle effects I think it could work (sort of?)
      To simulate it making floor wet or so I guess I could spray decals all over.

      If anyone has any other ideas, or any specific ideas on how to create what I'm talking about, that would be great.

      Heres a link to what I initially was thinking of: Youtubelink - Fluid/metaball

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        #4
        You can use force actors or force fields whatever they're called(I haven't been on UDK in awhile) to give the appearance of the water actually having buoyancy. The only problem I have found with this method is you cannot stand on top of things "floating".

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          #5
          You need loads of particles for that.

          the force fields are a good solution and you can use the water volume for 'floating'.

          Best of luck.

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