Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Skills of a level designer

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    Thanks for all the input you guys; I'm looking at examples of level design documents so I can build some of my own. That way I can present both UDK levels, as well as design documents and hopefully present myself as a bit more flexible.

    Comment


      #17
      there a multiple fields of design for games. including the ones you listed. to me, this post seems pointless because you should be able to known all those things or at least the basics of all of the titles you listed instead of asking people when ones you SHOULD know. you want to go above and beyond in your future career, not stick with the bare minimum.

      Comment


        #18
        I only ask for the bare minimum because I'm on a schedule; I have to start job hunting by X date. I'm asking everyone what I should know so I can expand on it later, and how my current skill set compares.

        Comment


          #19
          Originally posted by dyslexicfurby View Post
          I'm on a schedule; I have to start job hunting by X date.
          Err, I don't know how far your X date is, but game development is a career, not something you get good at just by reading a couple books. Moreover, design isn't really exact science. While you can be taught some basic guidelines, most of your skill will come from experience, since no design documentation survives playtesting unscathed, if at all. And unlike in games, you can't really grind XP in real life. If you're trying to rush things to get the bare minimum skill set, you won't anywhere, especially with the state of the industry these days, there are many people much more experienced than you who are struggling to get a job as well.

          Sorry if I sound a bit pessimistic, but for your own sake, I can't let you think it'll be as easy as planning your next holidays.

          Comment


            #20
            Believe me, I am under no illusions; I know it's going to be hard. Very hard. To be honest, I don't expect to hand my resume and the handful of levels I've built to an employer and land a job. I would be naive to think it worked like that. But I'm trying to give myself the best possible chance with what I have, which isn't much. That isn't to say I'm going to stop learning when I start sending out resumes. I'm just trying to get a handle on the best direction to take and make sure I have at least the foundation skills that I can build upon.

            Comment


              #21
              Originally posted by dyslexicfurby View Post
              Hypothetically, what skills would I need to present to a potential employer?
              If you want to phrase the skills you have for an employer you should tell them ALL of the skills you have, the more you can do the more opportunities arise.

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by Mougli View Post
                It is NOT the level designer's job to actually model the environment beyond the "whitebox" stage.
                You would be surprised at how much environmental work level designers actually do. The majority of the time, environment artists don't have enough time to 'pretty' the levels from just the block out stage. For each of my levels I will always give the environment artist a head start by using as many of the assets that we currently have available and filling out the level. I also do a first lighting pass as our poor lighting artist is at the end of the production chain, and she can't be expected to start all levels from scratch.

                Also, by letting the level designers do a small first pass of placement and lighting, the level feels more consistent with what the level designer first envisioned when blocking out the level.

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by Piranhi View Post
                  You would be surprised at how much environmental work level designers actually do. The majority of the time, environment artists don't have enough time to 'pretty' the levels from just the block out stage. For each of my levels I will always give the environment artist a head start by using as many of the assets that we currently have available and filling out the level. I also do a first lighting pass as our poor lighting artist is at the end of the production chain, and she can't be expected to start all levels from scratch.

                  Also, by letting the level designers do a small first pass of placement and lighting, the level feels more consistent with what the level designer first envisioned when blocking out the level.
                  Well, that's either bad planning or the exec team trying to make some savings

                  Because you do something doesn't necessarily means it's your job (which was my initial point). I'm a designer, though I'm doing a significant amount of technical support to the animators. That said, it is indeed quite common in this industry to do tasks that aren't what you're paid for, and that's precisely the reason why it's always recommended to have a broader skill set than required.

                  I do agree on having more consistent levels if the level designer is doing a bit of art integration, but that can be maintained with good communication

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X