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The trick from Singulairty

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    The trick from Singulairty

    I rented Singularity for the xbox, made with Unreal 3, and you go back and forth in time directly in game, cool stuff.

    In other words, you see one map in one time period and with the push of a button or event, you are transported to the exact location in the map only with other decor/athmosphere.

    I didn't really know by which name to look for this in the forums, just thought maybe it would be cool if anyone knew how to do this neat trick, they could share it perhaps?

    #2
    It's most likely two different maps. You can't just go back and forth all willy nilly. You travel back in time at set parts in the game.

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      #3
      True! What you change by yourself are those boxes and so on, from their squished state to being brand new and stuff. Still wondering if the level thing may be doable..

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        #4
        Originally posted by tracker05 View Post
        Still wondering if the level thing may be doable..
        Of course, being two different levels, all you need is... two different levels.

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          #5
          Quoted below.

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            #6
            Originally posted by Graylord View Post
            Of course, being two different levels, all you need is... two different levels.
            I guess my question is how can you superimpose essentially two versions of the same map only with slight changes in each, but eg, within the middle of a level. I'm new to kismet but I assume it's not too complex. I don't know about loading time for the second level, as I've seen real time cinematics pop in certain games (Alan Wake comes to mind) which clearly didn't load fast enough (though that game is not Unreal 3 based).

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              #7
              Hi tracker05. The trick wasn't really all that complicated. Like pretty much every Unreal Engine game, Sing used streaming for the singleplayer levels. For areas the player could access in 1950, separate sub-levels were made containing all the geometry the player could access and streamed in when necessary.

              For the areas you could access via time portal, it's just a special version of an Unreal teleporter actor. Iirc, something similar to the camera system was rolled into the teleport actor. You specified the matching teleport actor for the other time period, and it would render a real-time image. Horrendously expensive by the way.

              The uncontrollable timeshifts were handled a little differently. Those were events triggered through Uscript (via a Kismet node). There was a special actor that was placed in each time period. Inside that actor, the level designer recorded the relative offset of each period. The timeshift class would look up the player's current location, look up the relative offset for the other time period, then teleport the player. Everything else was FX.

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                #8
                Originally posted by Ferrik View Post
                Hi tracker05. The trick wasn't really all that complicated. Like pretty much every Unreal Engine game, Sing used streaming for the singleplayer levels. For areas the player could access in 1950, separate sub-levels were made containing all the geometry the player could access and streamed in when necessary.

                For the areas you could access via time portal, it's just a special version of an Unreal teleporter actor. Iirc, something similar to the camera system was rolled into the teleport actor. You specified the matching teleport actor for the other time period, and it would render a real-time image. Horrendously expensive by the way.

                The uncontrollable timeshifts were handled a little differently. Those were events triggered through Uscript (via a Kismet node). There was a special actor that was placed in each time period. Inside that actor, the level designer recorded the relative offset of each period. The timeshift class would look up the player's current location, look up the relative offset for the other time period, then teleport the player. Everything else was FX.
                Thanks so much for the info!

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                  #9
                  Yea level streaming would be the way to do it, reminds me of that one level in arkham asylum where your in the morgue, and you turn around only to see that the level has changed entirely.

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