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    Level Proportions

    Hello,
    I am a total noob on level design and I was wondering on how to draw realistic levels. My basic problem is that they usually look too big ot too small (for example too high or too long corridors).

    Has anybody an idea on how a UDK editor unit corresponds in meters for example (using the standard UDK Pawn height).

    I found out by myself that a square of 256x256 is 2 square meters since the pawn looks like to be tall as 256. Am I right?

    Thanks for the help,

    Mattias.

    #2
    1uu is equal to 2cm.

    The scale of the level however should not be 1:1, due to how we perceive the real world compared to a FPS game. Normally the scale will need to be at least 1.5x bigger in game, so for visual purposes it appears correct.

    Placing a vehicle, or a character mesh in the level can help with the scaling of things when you're designing the level layout.

    Another thing you will need to consider, is working to the grid, your level design will be so much easier if you keep everything (especially CSG) snapped to a large a grid as possible, textures scale better, meshes scale easier, and the game dynamics should be based around the grid to make level design easier.

    So you need to strike a balance, what looks right, what feels right, and what you have when working with a large grid.

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      #3
      Try placing the Skeletal Mesh robot in your scene, thats your player height. And remember that your FPS camera is a little bit higher than that robot. So try make stuff so that he has some room to the ceiling. I find that 256 walls are easiest to work with.

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        #4
        While it is correct that 1uu is 2cm, the default pawn in UDK is 196uu. So even if you work out the conversion, your default character would be 196cm tall which is about 6.4feet. It is a size of a basketball player. So compensate for that as well.

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          #5
          Originally posted by plugh View Post
          1uu is equal to 2cm.
          Originally posted by taz1004 View Post
          While it is correct that 1uu is 2cm, the default pawn in UDK is 196uu. So even if you work out the conversion, your default character would be 196cm tall which is about 6.4feet. It is a size of a basketball player. So compensate for that as well.
          1uu = 1 inch = 2,5 cm.
          The player is 96 inch heigh.

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            #6
            Yea, my mistake. Meant to say if you use 1uu=2cm conversion, default player becomes 192cm (96uu *2).

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              #7
              thanks for the help, guys (and ladies, who knows )... I'll have a try in the next days.

              Comment


                #8
                It's been said before but I just felt the need to stress it even more: Don't get caught up in "realistic".

                Depending on how realistic your game/level is supposed to be to begin with, you can decide how far you want to go with it, but even in the most realistic games the designers have to keep it fun. Fun means it's got to -FEEL- right. i.e. if your character runs at real-world-running-speed, it'll seem slow to most players and slow is boring. Or, if you build a really clamped-up level, the player might have trouble navigating through the rooms and corridors.

                Also keep in mind that a realistic layout of a building can also stand in the way of "playability" and therefore fun.

                Lastly (and again just emphasizing(?) what was said before): try to stick to the grid, preferably 64,128,192 and so on (but 32, 16 and 8 might be necessary sometimes and are acceptable, too).

                To sum it up:
                - when in doubt, make it FEEL right instead of actually being right (in terms of exact size and stuff like that). Play with different sizes until you feel "ok, this is how it should look." If the door's to small, make it bigger. Don't expect your first tries to be perfect, you'll need some practise to get a good feeling for it.

                - stick to the grid (in my opinion, the larger the gridsize, the better)

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