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Creating a level using 3d studio max

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    Creating a level using 3d studio max

    Hey, I've been asking everywhere, and I wanted to ask you guys:

    So my girlfriend is very quick/adept with 3d studio max:

    I want to make a deus ex mod.

    She wants to add to her interior design portfolio (and she has an awesome comp)

    We were both ready to make the mod _but_ the Deus Ex SDK didn't really allow such maps to be made/imported from Max. So someone suggested UDK, and we've already made the first level without any official materials (textures). So the collisions work, and that's good.

    Now, different "IDs" can be assigned to a mesh in order to allow different textures. Obviously I'll need different textures for the floor, bedspread, sheets, table, etc. etc. But, a video I watched suggests it is very taxing for more than 4 IDs to be assigned to a mesh. Now, I haven't tested it, but could any expert on the subject confirm this? Is there a way around this problem (such as using multiple static meshes)?

    Also, is there a way that I can save or export a level made as such, such that the Deus Ex SDK recognizes it for me to build the Deus Ex elements on top of? If that is not likely, is there a way I can somehow copy over the Deus Ex systems (menu screen/ conversation logistics/ HUD/ models/ animation/ AI) into UDK for me to build the game through UDK?

    I'm really serious about trying to coop my girlfriends talents into this game, so if anyone has any idea, please let me know.

    #2
    You split big architecture/level meshes into smaller ones, then reuse them all over level.

    If you want to make whole level in max, you need to split in late into smaller sections, then uv map and skin each section separately.

    Hourences have great tutorial about meshes for unreal.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Nawrot View Post
      If you want to make whole level in max, you need to split in late into smaller sections, then uv map and skin each section separately.
      Thank you, but what is this instruction right here again?^

      Comment


        #4
        1. Modeling for UDK is specific tasks. Depends on what you try to achive, but mostly you should model with parts in mind.
        2. Imagine Lego, then make meshes like lego each part cloud fit to other part this way or another.
        3. Let's say city. Do not model Entire building, just make walls, windows, doors, other building part, and make building in UnrealEd from it.
        4. Also I do not recomend modeling entire level in exterior software. It might look easier if you know what you do... but it gonnna be really hard to split it into small lego parts. If you really want to model everything exterior, model it in parts from beging.

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          #5
          Agreed. Ok, it seems that I have to do this:

          I have to break everything up into smaller pieces based on the amount of textures being used on the piece.

          So if I were modeling an apartment, I would have a "floor mesh" which I will have tile and carpet textures for the bathroom/kitchen and carpeted living space. Then I would import the floor into UDK.

          Next I would have a "wall mesh" which I will have green felt and wooden crown-molding textures for. I would import the wall-mesh and set it over the floor.

          The individual items like mirrors, windows, and furniture, I'm guessing, would be best made with the UDK exclusively lest I be forced to recycle the same items over and over again rather than spend tons of memory on needing so many meshes.

          Is all of this pretty much true?

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            #6
            In the UE3 it uses less memory to use duplicate meshes then it does to use unique ones. This makes it so that it'd be better to, for example, make one chair in 3ds Max and use the same one several times in the UDK.

            Additionally, the UE3 does not render meshes that cannot be seen. That's why it's better to split it up into parts.

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              #7
              Can you imagine the mess of what would be called a UV if you did not section up a large level in 3DsMax.... My god the madness.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by micahpharoh View Post
                In the UE3 it uses less memory to use duplicate meshes then it does to use unique ones. This makes it so that it'd be better to, for example, make one chair in 3ds Max and use the same one several times in the UDK.
                Right, but most of the maps I'll be making are re-visitable anyway (fps-rpg), so I don't think it will hurt to have a standard mesh for certain items like beds or chairs within a certain map.

                Additionally, the UE3 does not render meshes that cannot be seen. That's why it's better to split it up into parts.
                Don't quite understand you here: Do you mean that when I walk out of the apartment (supposing it is made of multiple static meshes) they are not rendered?

                Also, may I ask, what do you mean by parts? Let's say I make an entire apartment building in 3d studio Max, using a total of four materials. I use two on the floors, and two on the walls. Is there going to be a problem as I walk around this building? I am technically only using 2 meshes ("floors mesh" and "walls mesh")

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Neveos View Post
                  Right, but most of the maps I'll be making are re-visitable anyway (fps-rpg), so I don't think it will hurt to have a standard mesh for certain items like beds or chairs within a certain map.

                  Don't quite understand you here: Do you mean that when I walk out of the apartment (supposing it is made of multiple static meshes) they are not rendered?

                  Also, may I ask, what do you mean by parts? Let's say I make an entire apartment building in 3d studio Max, using a total of four materials. I use two on the floors, and two on the walls. Is there going to be a problem as I walk around this building? I am technically only using 2 meshes ("floors mesh" and "walls mesh")
                  You might wanna read these:

                  http://hourences.com/book/tutorialsue3modeling1.htm
                  http://hourences.com/book/tutorialsue3modeling2.htm

                  http://udn.epicgames.com/Three/ModularLevelDesign.html

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Neveos View Post
                    Don't quite understand you here: Do you mean that when I walk out of the apartment (supposing it is made of multiple static meshes) they are not rendered?
                    Let's say that your apartment has a bed and table inside that are separate meshes that you've added. When the bed and table are obscured by another object completely they do not render. Even if you just turn around and they're behind you they aren't rendered.

                    As I understand it, if it's all one mesh then if any part of it is visible then the whole thing is rendered, aside from backfaces.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Thanks. These are very interesting, especially the Gears of War one.

                      Originally posted by micahpharoh View Post
                      Let's say that your apartment has a bed and table inside that are separate meshes that you've added. When the bed and table are obscured by another object completely they do not render. Even if you just turn around and they're behind you they aren't rendered.

                      As I understand it, if it's all one mesh then if any part of it is visible then the whole thing is rendered, aside from backfaces.
                      As opposed to non-static mesh use? Will this result in any performance issues from a mesh-only map? I would think that this would actually free up a lot memory in a mesh-only map.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Neveos View Post
                        Thanks. These are very interesting, especially the Gears of War one.

                        As opposed to non-static mesh use? Will this result in any performance issues from a mesh-only map? I would think that this would actually free up a lot memory in a mesh-only map.
                        Not really... simply because the engine considers the mesh as a collection of polygons and not a single mesh. Assuming that you've modeled a house of 5000 polys. If you won't split it in smaller parts the engine will load 5000 polys even if in game you can only see 1 wall. But if you split it in smaller parts the engine will load only what the player can see and not the entire mesh of 5000 polys.
                        It can't be any simpler.
                        So.. like other people said it 'd be better to split you maps into smaller parts and get them together in UDK's level editor.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by ThePriest909 View Post
                          Not really... simply because the engine considers the mesh as a collection of polygons and not a single mesh. Assuming that you've modeled a house of 5000 polys. If you won't split it in smaller parts the engine will load 5000 polys even if in game you can only see 1 wall. But if you split it in smaller parts the engine will load only what the player can see and not the entire mesh of 5000 polys.
                          It can't be any simpler.
                          So.. like other people said it 'd be better to split you maps into smaller parts and get them together in UDK's level editor.
                          Why did you say "It can't be any simpler"? I'm not arguing for an alternative case.

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