Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Lighting advice anyone?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • replied
    Why not just use a mesh that acts like the light rays you wish to portray on the grate? You could even use an emissive channel to add to the atmosphere.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    My advice is to think about what is really lighting your scene. Where is this light coming from? Imaginary lights floating in space are notoriously difficult to get right as primary light sources, and are really best reserved for fill and accent lights.

    Model some little spotlights or shaded bulbs into your machines. Place these in strategic areas then see what you end up with - you should get a far more realistic result.

    Alternatively raise some of the machines or tube bases off the floor and put a light underneath them, or create an emissive material which emits a glow from inside portions of the machinery, which will bounce out and fill the pits with a coloured glow.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    An option to consider if you're on the fence about how much lighting is too much/too little is to use Matinee and make some lights maybe pulse slowly, or have the light move along, only highlighting a portion of the room at a time.
    Maybe not what you're looking to do, but another option to keep in mind.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by MadMinstrel View Post
    How about applying an emissive material to whatever's below the grating (there's going to be a fluid, right?) and letting lightmass figure it out? If you want shadows cast on the ceiling you could add a directional light that only casts shadows. But there shouldn't be any really since these are rather large light sources and any shadows would be drowned out IRL.
    I did think of emmisive materials actually yes, Though I wasnt sure if lightmass took those into account or not as I have little to no experiance with emissive materials within Unreal.

    Underneath are going to be a few light sources, not any kind of fluid under the grating no sorry:P

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    How about applying an emissive material to whatever's below the grating (there's going to be a fluid, right?) and letting lightmass figure it out? If you want shadows cast on the ceiling you could add a directional light that only casts shadows. But there shouldn't be any really since these are rather large light sources and any shadows would be drowned out IRL.

    Leave a comment:


  • started a topic Lighting advice anyone?

    Lighting advice anyone?

    Hey guys.

    Im working on a little piece for my portfolio, an environment specifically, and a walkway within the center of the room is a grating, complete with lighting coming from underneath.

    My problem however is a: TRYING TO decide what Lighting to use, See...A direction Light makes sense whilst at the same time a few spotlights make sense too... I'd like the light from the grating to come up but not actually LEAVE the grating area..if that makse sense...as in I plan on adding fog to the light so that you can see the light as it comes up ( god...i suck at explaining these things).

    her is an image of the scene (without textures as I didnt bother to turn them on when i took it).

    The room is essentially this shape:


    Unfortunatly If i put say four lights, one in the center, one at either ends of the cross then its just way too Bright, and using a directional light will create a light going upwards all the way along the room, as the dips in the floor (both underneath the grating and also in the area's where the test tubes are...if that image shows that well) are all the same depth, I can always just make the ones under the grating deeper so that i get around this problem, though im sure there must be a better way of doing this with the lighting alone.

    Anyone know of the best way to achieve the result im after at all?

    I appologise for my inability to explain things very well.
Working...
X