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Help With First Project On iOS Required - Kids Educational App

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    Help With First Project On iOS Required - Kids Educational App

    Hi,

    I'm starting my first project on iOS and UDK in general, and would appreciate some guidance.

    Having installed UDK and getting used to the interface and how to bring content in from Maya, I would like to take the step into some iOS Dev.

    What I want to do is some basic kids educational type games, I have a character which I want to appear on screen within a scene, the user will be asked a question and 3 boxes / choices will be give, the user will tap a box / choice and if correct the character will animate for success or if incorrect, the character will animate for a failed response. As I said being fairly new to UDK, I was wondering what was the best way to go about setting something like this up in UDK. I would like to use Kismet, as my programming skills are fairly weak, but I'd also heard suggestions that I should use scaleform on another forum I posted at, but didn't hear any further responses on the matter.

    Anyway, I'd appreciate any and all advice given on the best way forward for me to go with this, hints / tips / tutorials, anything !

    Regards.

    #2
    http://eat3d.com/udk_mobile
    That DVD answered pretty much all my questions about the iOS specific development. Having said that I already used UDK for a year for PC stuff. In general I would say it is better to practice on PC first as the iOS side of UDK can produce pretty... unstable results if you aren't careful.

    Comment


      #3
      Thanks, XilenceX

      I've seen that DVD, but thought it was very specific in what it taught, but I think I'll pick it up anyway if it helps in any way.

      I've also seen the following book : -

      http://www.packtpub.com/unreal-devel...ers-guide/book

      Which looks very interesting, anyone here have it, would you recommend ?

      Thanks

      Comment


        #4
        Kismet is the way to go if your programming skills aren't that great. Matinee will save your life if used properly. I created my first iOS story book http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/story...1488?ls=1&mt=8 using only kismet and matinee. But I did learn that too much kismet can be a pain. You are going to have to learn how to use booleans and declare variable in order to make an educational game work.

        I blogged about most of my progress creating this game here and it may give you some insight. My game was going to be a robot walking through a factory and there would be 3 doors and a math problem above it. Once you walked to the correct answere (door) it would open to another room with more problems.

        Another word of advice, learn how to use particles. This is a huge plus in the look and feel of your educational game. Its flair. As far as the menus go, I just used touch events on 3D objects as a separate level.

        Comment


          #5
          Hi, OmegaBlue36

          Thanks for the information, yeah, my preference is kismet, as my coding skills aren't great, and I'm looking at Matinee to back this up as you mentioned.

          Is too much Kismet a problem on iOS ?

          Looking forward to reading your progress and finding out any potential insights.

          Thanks

          Comment


            #6
            Just like any coding, if its bloated it won't be as efficient. I've always been a kismet guy, but at my current job I am learning coding so I do a mix of the two if I can. The big issue with kismet is that it is "per level" so if you have multiple levels, and you use kismet to create a majority of the functionality you will have to copy the nodes to each level. The great thing about udk is it ease of use and animation tree's and particles.....well pretty much everything.

            But let me tell you something about game development. 80% of it is design. Concept art, level design, Layout, gui look and feel, story, ect.....Once you have all that completed and planned, then you spend the next 20% cranking it out. It will save you time in the long run. I understand the need for rapid prototyping, but don't get carried away. And Feature Creep!!! Watch out for this. This is the addition of new ideas or mechanics that push your dates way back. Save some things for version two.

            Comment


              #7
              Hi,

              Thanks for the advice on the kismet, I'll have to watch out for that, I have in mind something similar to what the scope of your project was, simple screen with character that is animated, questions appear which require a press of a button to answer, a, b or c type affair, if correct, character plays new animation, progression onto scene or questions, if fail, character plays 'fail' animation and user gets a chance to answer again when question is repeated.

              I'm not completely alien to the game design process, I'm just new to the UDK environment and was looking for good advice on best practices, etc, so thanks all for that !

              Regards.

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