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Thread: Unrealscript in Unreal Engine 4?

  1. #41
    100GPing100
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by VendorX View Post
    You're sure..? Well, let see what we can find in Unreal Wiki...

    Default properties:
    The compiler removes defaultproperties and cpptext sections from source files during import. Cpptext lines will be replaced by the comment // (cpptext) to prevent line number changes, the defaultproperties block is removed without replacement, which is why it should always be placed at the end of the file after all other code.

    Functions:
    A function in UnrealScript is a subroutine associated with a specific class. Functions can define zero or up to sixteen parameters and optionally a return type. Various modifiers can be used in the declaration to change the way the function can be accessed or how it behaves when called.

    Events:
    ...the keyword event may replace the keyword function without any effect on the UnrealScript level. However, when exporting native header files from script code, event functions will have calling stubs generated so the UnrealScript function can be called more easily from C++ code. These generated C++ methods have the name eventNameOfUnrealScriptFunction and their parameters and possible return type reflects the UnrealScript function declaration.

    Most important difference is, that that native call -event- you can enable/disable - function not.

    If you want to know how, look in to Object.uc...
    Code:
    //
    // Probe messages.
    //
    
    native(117) final function Enable( name ProbeFunc );
    native(118) final function Disable( name ProbeFunc );
    As I said, at unreal script level there's no difference between event and function (I wasn't referring to the DefaultProperties).


    UE4 will most probably use Unreal Script, might have some differences but it'll be Unreal Script.

  2. #42
    Derp
    Guest
    I don't see why anyone would want to use C++? Unrealscript is a simple and powerful language when used right. I originally came from actionscript 3 and no problem adapting to unrealscript at all. In fact, if Epic changed over to C++, more and more people would probably become even more scared of programming. C++ is a messy language, heck to even fully understand it you'd have to firstly learn C.

  3. #43
    ambershee
    Guest
    Games are programmed in C++, this is an almost universal truth. The switch to it means "real" game developers don't have to learn a new language just to start making games. Executing equivalent code in C++ over UnrealScript also means significant improvements in speed (in the order of 20-30 times faster).

    You don't have to learn C first. I've never learnt 'C'.

  4. #44
    Derp
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by ambershee View Post
    Games are programmed in C++, this is an almost universal truth. The switch to it means "real" game developers don't have to learn a new language just to start making games. Executing equivalent code in C++ over UnrealScript also means significant improvements in speed (in the order of 20-30 times faster).

    You don't have to learn C first. I've never learnt 'C'.
    I said, you'd have to learn C first if you want to fully UNDERSTAND C++. You can't exactly compare C++ to an interpreted language (Unrealscript), it'll always be faster in performance!

  5. #45
    Mougli
    Guest
    I don't think you need to fully understand C++ for gameplay programming.

  6. #46
    RNG
    Guest
    You don't need to learn C first, you don't need to understand everything about it (I really doubt that there's a person that mastered it 100% to be honest), that doesn't change the fact that C++ is way too complex for gameplay design. Its too easy to screw things up with it.

    I'm not saying it can't be used, its just that its not that practical to use when compared to interpreted high level languages. I'm guessing this is what Derp actually meant.

  7. #47
    A.M.M.D.
    Guest
    I don't see how C++ is better for gameplaydesign at all. You don't need this kind of performance for gameplay code. The reason C++, C and assembly are used for games is because performance is crucial when it comes to rendering algorithms. But for gameplay, I suppose that a garbage collected and interpreted language is actually more convenient. The only thing I miss in UC/Java/AS is call by reference.

  8. #48
    ambershee
    Guest
    I'd personally prefer continuing to work in UnrealScript for gameplay, however it's hard to ignore that there are plenty of compelling reasons to make a switch. I personally wouldn't mind working in C#.

  9. #49
    Crusha K. Rool
    Guest
    UnrealScript's abstraction degree is what makes it so powerful. It's intuitive to write code in it, you don't need to care about networking yourself, don't need to worry too much about manual garbage collection, have an easily understandable concept of states. Why give all those advantages up?

  10. #50
    macattackk
    Guest
    yes id be sad if they switched to C++, though I think something like unity does with C# might be cool. Would it improve performance to use C#? Also, isnt there a way for people to use C++ for gameplay coding now if they wanted to? If not, they could just implement that and have both Unrealscript and C++ be useable, depending on what you want to use.

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